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October 23, 2002 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2002-10-23

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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, October 23, 2002 - 7

MSA
Continued from Page .
"Depiction of black males is negative. The only time they
mention black male is about crime," McDonald said.
While normally there is plenty of sitting room for
constituents, at last night's meeting every seat in the
house was full and the walls of the MSA chambers were
lined with students. Most came to give their personal
opinions of the Daily.
While most constituents who spoke publicly urged
MSA representatives to support the boycott and listed
the ways they feel the Daily misrepresents minority stu-
dents and organizations, after the vote most constituents
asked to speak off the record and not be quoted.
Students supporting the boycott spoke of demands
that they said need to be met before it can end.
Constituents spoke, pushing for a public statement
printed by the Daily that would act as an apology for its
0 misrepresentation of minorities.
Two minority staff members of the Daily also spoke,
asking MSA not to support the resolution and saying
that the minority leaders speaking in favor of the boy-
cott were not representing them. They said the Daily
was making improvements internally by drafting an
internal mission statement and discussing the issues
addressed in the boycott with staff members.
Daily Editor in Chief Jon Schwartz said he was disap-
pointed by MSA's support of the boycott, but that it was
not unexpected. Schwartz has, in the past, said that the
Daily is far more concerned with the legitimate con-
cerns of the coalition than the subsequent boycott.
The Minority Affairs Commission first proposed the
resolution at MSA three weeks ago. Since then, the Les-
bian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Affairs Commis-
sion and the Women's Issues Commission have signed
on along with 30 other student groups.
Also at last night's meeting, MSA voted to fund edu-
cation on the University's use of race-based admissions
policies, although they did not pass a resolution voicing
support for affirmative action.

I I

Just passing by

Blue Out seeks to show
unity agaist Mic igan
State at Nov. 2 game

BLUE OUT
Continued from Page 1
the Blue Out in full effect will be
exhilarating to the whole team, and
everyone will know the fans definitely
got our back," senior co-captain Ben-
nie Joppru said.
There will be commemorative long-
sleeved T-shirts available for all fans
that wish to Go Blue. Because the Blue
Out is student organized and intended
simply to unite and energize the fans
and players, the T-shirts are available
for just $10.
The T-shirts are available at this
price because the organizers do not
intend to make a profit - they sim-
ply want a unified spirit at the foot-
ball games.
The T-shirts will have the Blue
Out logo on the front with the date
of the game. The back will read,
"Go Blue! Beat MSU!" and will be
available in front of the Michigan
Union, on the Diag and in front of
Touchdown Cafe on South Universi-
ty Street. Sales begin today from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m.
Students have noticed the same

"When I saw the
Nebraska game and
saw the sea of red,
I wondered if we
could pull it off."
- Jason Bartle
LSA sophomore
trend at other university stadiums.'
"When I saw the Nebraska game
and saw the sea of red, I wondered if
we could pull it off," LSA sophomore
Jason Bartle said. "It would be sweet
to look around and see blue every-
where. It is definitely about time we
did something like that."
Blue Out organizers are hoping to
start a tradition, but this year they just
want to get the word out.
"The important thing to us this year
is to be sure the students are unified,"
Feferman said. "If nothing else, if sec-
tions 25-31 are in blue, we will have
succeeded."

TOM FELDKAMP/Daily
Engineering junior Jason Krajcovic,walks by Yost Arena on State Street
yesterday afternoon.

*POSTHUMUS
Continued from Page 1
ing to oppose property tax increases, which he
called a reversal of her previous stance on the issue.
"What are you going to believe?" he said. "She
doesn't have a solid understanding of what working
men and women go through."
Posthumus pledged to avoid raising local proper-
ty taxes.
In fact, much of Posthumus' campaign agenda
centers around utilizing further tax cuts to spur
continued job growth. Throughout his campaign,
Posthumus has credited Engler's tax cut pro-
grams for motivating job growth and refueling a
staggering economy, while promising not to raise
KOLB
Continued from Page 1
the House in 2001.
Kolb said the state can combat pollution by
increasing environmental law enforcement, giving
businesses financial incentives to clean up their
acts, and promoting alternate sources of energy.
Michigan should form environmental industrial
parks to encourage companies to use each others'
by-products, cutting down on waste and pollution,
he said. "What we have to realize is that environ-
ment protection is not a negative impact on eco-
nomic development."
There are also viable ways the state can encour-
age homeowners to make their own energy using
windmills or solar panels, Kolb said. Using a net
* metering system, homes would pay lower bills if
they returned energy to their electrical company.
One of the environmental issues Kolb said
concerns him most is the preservation of agri-
cultural land.
"Urban sprawl is basically the inefficient use of
land, and that's what we're seeing," he said.
the michigan daily

a single tax.
Posthumus hopes to promote further job growth
by cutting Michigan's Income and Single Business
taxes. The two taxes, currently 4.2 and 2.1 percent
respectively, were traditionally decreased .1 percent
each year, but lower state revenues halted the cuts.
Posthumus began his political career managing
Engler's campaign for the state House of Repre-
sentatives. He was elected to the state Senate in
1982 and then replaced the governor as the Sen-
ate's majority leader in 1990 when Engler was
elected to his first term as governor.
At the fundraiser, state Rep. Gene DeRossett, a
Republican from Freedom Township who is seek-
ing re-election, cited Posthumus' legislative experi-
ence as a reason to vote for him.
To solve the problem, Kolb said the state must
find new sources of funding for the Purchase of
Development Rights programs that allow local
governments to plan how land will be used.
Apart from environmental protection, Kolb
named stimulating economic development and
improving public education and health care as his
top priorities.
As a member of the House committee that allo-
cates money to higher education, Kolb also wants
more funding for Michigan's public universities.
"We can see a direct proportion of how much the
state gives universities and how much tuition goes
up," he said.
"I doubt there's a better investment of public rev-
enue than into our public universities."
Michigan State University's proximity to the
state capital of Lansing gives it an edge over the
University of Michigan in funding that needs to be
addressed, he said.
Budget shortfalls will require cuts in some pro-
grams, and Kolb said one place to look is the
state's prisons, clogged with drug users and the
mentally ill.

SCHOLAR
Continued from Page 1
communist countries to democratic market economies,"
Svejnar added.
Over the years, it has expanded its scope to include coun-
tries across the world, Svejnar said. At its annual conference
in Washington last April, the subject of income gaps
between poor and wealthy countries was examined.
"It's the only institute that's dedicated to transition and
emerging economies," Svejnar said.
There are currently 160 scholars with the institute. Many
work at the University level, while others work at research
institutes and some are policy-makers. University faculty
members account for 40 members.
As for why Albright was selected to become a schol-
ar, Chite said the institute was seeking a major public
figure.
"We wanted somebody who would bring stature and
recognition to the position and the institute. We set our
sights high. We think it's a validation of the work we
ENGINEERING
Continued from Page 1
ing and the Diag on North Campus," Coronado said. "If a
new building gets built, it would have to be beyond the Fran-
cois-Xavier Bagnoud building, and that would be too far and
we'll need more buses."
With most engineering students using the University bus
system, Coronado expressed the necessity of more buses and
bus routes to accommodate an expanding North Campus.
"The North Commuter bus only runs till 7:30 p.m.," Coro-
nado said. "With the reconstruction, we will need more buses
and bus routes to cover the increased space."
Although these concerns were raised about the effects of
the donations and reconstruction program, the future of North
Campus seems likely to be the home of a revamped and
strengthened Engineering college.
"The faculty in the College of Engineering are excited and
optimistic about the future," Director said.

Do YOU KNOW OF NEWS YOU WOULD
LIKE TO READt ABOUT IN TH E DAIW
WE HAVE TO KNOW ABOUT IT BEFORE
WE CAN WRITE ABOUT IT, SO TILL US
ABOUT IT BY E-MAILING US AT
NEWS@MICHIGANDAILY.COM
Do you H ave Acne?:
' If you have acne you may qualify for an investigational study
at the University of Michigan Department of Dermatology.
¢ You may also receive compensation for your participation.
¢ If you are interested in participating, call the University of
Michigan Department of Dermatology to find out more.
¢ The number is : (734) 764-DERM ___" ___

11

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Applications are available at
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Send resume to
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or call Tijana at 615-0135
with any questions.
ARE YOU FEELING sad or blue? Our
project is looking at stress hormones in indi-
viduals suffering from depression. The study
includes an overnight stay in the hospital, IV
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MICHIGAN TELEFUND NOW HIRING stu-
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PART TIME PROGRAM Coordinator for af-
ter school care. The Youth Department of the
Jewsih Community Center needs a well orga-
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for kindergarten through fifth grade. The right
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ground, excellent interpersonal and communi-
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PART-TIME HELP NEEDED for phones
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POSITION AVAILABLE we are seeking a
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e-mail notes of interest and CV to Dr.
Theodora S. Ross at tsross@umich.edu
REAL LIFE LIVING SERVICES is accept-
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people w/experience in OT, PT, ST, Psych,
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TYPIST NEEDED FOR Bar application.

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DRUMKIT, TRUMPET PLAYERS wanted
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Please contact mstock@umich.edu
RETRO THREADS 215 S.State 3rd flr.
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FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED for bi-
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ROOMMATE WANTED for 3 person apt.
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I-

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