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October 11, 2002 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2002-10-11

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 11, 2002 - 7A

BRATER
Continued from Page 1A
tax to ensure that trucks, which she said
greatly contribute to wearing down
Michigan's roads, pay an amount of tax
proportional to that paid by automobile
drivers.
Brater said sev-
eral areas the
restructured budg-
et should focus on
are education,
mental health,s
environmentalv
policies and
investing in the
economy.
She said her pri- Brater
ority in terms of education is providing
funds for K-12 education, to reduce class
size, train teachers and institute earlier
childhood education and adult education
programs. But she added that Michigan

politicians must stop bickering over
which public universities receive the
most higher education funding.
"We need to stop arguing over
who's going to get a bigger piece of
the pie and look at how to make the
pie bigger," she said.
One solution Brater mentioned was
cutting back on correctional institution
funding, which she said constitutes as
much of the state budget as higher edu-
cation funding. Brater said the correc-
tional funds are too high because many
people institutionalized in Michigan
prisons are either substance abusers or
are mentally ill.
One of Brater's goals is to return
imprisoned mental health patients to
proper facilities, but she said she is con-
cerned that Gov. John Engler shut down
15 of 21 hospitals.
"The dollars did not follow people on
to the streets," she said.
Among Brater's other priorities are

economic and environmentalpolicies.
Building southeast Michigan into a tech-
nology corridor and investing in urban
areas are two of her ideas to boost Michi-
gan's economy, Brater said, adding that
workers' rights and collective bargaining
must not be abandoned in the process.
Brater's environmental ideas include
protecting Michigan's farm land,
improving public transportation to limit
traffic problems and urban sprawl and
preventing Great Lakes water diversion
and slant oil drilling under the lakes. She
added that environmental standards
need to be restored to deal with pollu-
tion and harmful aquatic organisms
originating in Canada.
Brater said she is the only state Senate
candidate who is completely pro-choice.
Brater and Darr are running for a seat
in the state Senate vacated by term-lim-
ited Democratic Sen. Alma Wheeler
Smith. So-and-so many third party can-
didates are also running.

ISRAEL
Continued from Page 1A
groups that seek her destruction, and
Jews are under attack even here."
University Regent Laurence
Deitch (D-Bingham Farms) also
spoke at the event regarding the
divestment conference.
"This is a University where speech,
no matter how objectionable, is pro-
tected. This is a place where we
encourage civil debate,"he said.
"I say to Jewish students in the audi-
ence that you will make a mistake if
you keep this to yourselves and do not
reach out," he said.
"This University community is filled
with men and women of all faiths and
races who will stand up against bigotry
and intolerance if you give them a logi-
cal and morally compelling reason to
do so. You all have the power to do that.
One by one, nothing is greater than the
power of one individual determined to
do the right thing."
Afternoon classes at the Jewish
Academy of Metropolitan Detroit were
canceled so that all 115 students could
attend the rally. Michigan State Uni-
versity students were also present in
the crowd.
The event's keynote speaker, polit-
ical science Prof. Raymond Tanter,
compared America's fight against
terrorism to Israel's struggle with ter-
ror. "I have many Arab students,
many Muslim students in general,
and many Israelis and many Jewish

students. I'svery important that we
come together in a civil way as we've
done today and not hate the other
side, but to keep a dialogue open
with the other side.
"One of the problems is that the
military capabilities that America has
- which are second to none in the
world - are largely irrelevant to
deterring terrorists," Tanter said. "So
it is also true that the great military
capacity of the Israeli defense forces
cannot defer terrorists. So what do
you do? You go after the terrorist
organizations. And what do you do to
the leaders? You destroy them. You
kill them."
Regarding the war on Iraq, Tanter
said it was "an antidote" and that there
would be no backlash. "Arab people
won't go crazy, Muslim people won't
go crazy. They'll roll over because they
hate Saddam Hussein."
Following Tanter's speech, LSA sen-
ior Kirsten Quinzi said she was both-
ered by his statements.
"It seems so obvious that people
should just get together and talk about
these things and not kill each other.
But it's funny, there's no group that
advocates getting together and looking
for peaceful resolutions."
Quinzi said she and Engineering
senior Yair Ghitza are interested in pro-
moting inter-group dialogue. Quinzi
said student groups on this campus
only represent two extreme views of
the conflict, and there is no group that
brings the two together.

IRAQ
Continued from Page 1A
does that,' Gephardt said.
The Senate was working on the same
resolution, voting 75-25 to choke off
delaying tactics and move toward a final
vote - expected late Thursday. It voted
down a series of efforts to weaken or
block the resolution, as did the House.
Senate leaders of both parties predicted
easy passage.
The administration got a big boost
when Senate Majority Leader Tom
Daschle announced he was putting
aside his misgivings to support the
president.
"I believe it is important for Amer-
ica to speak with one voice," said
Daschle (D-S.D.). "It is neither a
Democratic resolution nor a Republi-
can resolution. It is now a statement
of American resolve and values."
LAWSUIT
Continued from Page 1A
"We're worried, and we're not just
worried about this weekend. We're wor-
ried about what happens afterward."
Schlussel said the lawsuit was not
filed until Tuesday, four days before
the conference was to begin, because
event organizers only recently
released a list of its speakers.
The effort she made to work with
University officials, before resort-
ing to a lawsuit, also held up the
legal attack, she said.

SPIRIT
Continued from Page 1A
ington on Saturday, Aug. 31.
"Believe in this team. Look at the game quarter by
quarter, minute by minute," Cavanaugh said. "The spirit
we're trying to get out is contagious."
This weekend marks the first Fall study break in the
University's history, and many students will not be attend-
ing the game because they can take a trip home or a vaca-
tion during the four-day weekend ahead. Combating this
possible loss of fan support and spirit, the marching band,
cheerleaders and dance team will practice together for the
first time in preparation for tomorrow's game.
"The students' getting involved and cheering will get
others involved as well as the other people who are just
buying tickets to go to the game," he said.
One of the complaints found in Cavanaugh's letter con-
cerns the fan's booing heard during recent games.
"Remember that everyone out there is a student here.
At Michigan we don't boo our fellow students. I've
talked with students who say 'we're not booing a play-
er but a play,' and I respond that that's not how it's
taken," he said.
Other members of the marching band consider the
Michigan fan's noise to be a fraction of the noise at other

schools.
"The fans need to get up," said Rob Farley, a Music
sophomore and tuba player.,Notre Dame "had 30,000
fewer fans and were eight times louder than us. If the rest
of the fans can get up the way we can, then we will be
where we want to."
Students who consider themselves active fans agree
with Cavanaugh's accusations about the student cheering
problem, but they also believe that all the other sections
are too quiet as well.
"I've heard our crowd been called a 'symphony crowd'
- we all stand up, clap and sit down," LSA junior Peter
Gudritz said. "If you watch Miami's games, or Florida's
games or Tennessee's, their fans are all going nuts."
Saying that the student section support is "decent,"
Gudritz attributed the lack of cheering and fan support as
a problem in "the rest of the stadium."
Shant Norsigian, an LSA junior, said that the fan sup-
port problem lies in the lacking alumni support.
" ... You see the alumni, and they are sitting down and
watching the game with a monocle," Norsigian said.
Students attending the first 3:30 p.m. game of the sea-
son will have an extra amount of time to prepare for the
game by grilling or barbequing. The game against Penn
State will mark the sixth game for the Wolverines, who
are 4-1 this season.

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OCTOBER 12, 2002

11:30AM

-3:30 PM

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