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October 04, 2002 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2002-10-04

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 4, 2002 -- 7

WEBSITE
Continued from Page 1
ty professor of Middle East and Asian
language and culture, referred to the
website as a "hit list," targeting inno-
cent members of higher education.
"I don't know why I am worthy of
having a dossier," Dabashi said.
This is not the first time Dabashi
said he has suffered because of the
Middle East Forum.
Since this summer, his undesired
connection to the group has made
him the victim of "racist and
obscene" harassment - his comput-
er was hacked and spammed e-mails
were sent from his Columbia
account, he said.

He added that he received
obscene phone calls against him
and his students.
Earlier this week, Campus Watch
announced changes to its format by
including professors' dossiers under its
survey of institutions section.
The content of both sections remains
unchanged, Pipes said.
While the website has attracted
national attention, Cole said he has no
plans to change his teaching tactics or
opinions.
"I am not someone who can be
intimidated. I have always treated all
my students with respect and fairness
and have good to excellent teaching
evaluations,"he said.
Cole is concerned about the

affect Campus Watch will have on
students who report professors'
behavior, he said.
"To any degree that they can suborn.
a student to actually spy and send
reports to a dossier on a member of the
university community, they have
deformed that student's character and
pushed him or her to do something
essentially undemocratic and anti-intel-
lectual. That would be a very great
shame," he said.
Since he said he doesn't use the
classroom as a forum to propagate his
views, Dabashi is not worried about
students' reporting him.
Over the course of his 25-year teach-
ing career, Dabashi said he has often
been the subject of student praise.

W ORDS the active investigation, he said he
hoped students always feel free to
Continued from Page 1 - report inappropriate comments or
uphold the values embedded in those conduct made by University
concepts,' said Senior Vice Provost for employees.
Academic and Multicultural Affairs "Residents and student resident
Lester Monts. staff should never hesitate to bring
"If these comments are true, this forward concerns about inappropri-
should be a concern for everyone in ate or insensitive comments or con-
the campus community," Monts said. duct by a member of the University
"No one on campus has an excuse for Housing community - whether stu-
being insensitive to someone else." dent or employee - to an appropri-
Griffin said he contacted Universi- ate staff member, advisor, or
ty President Mary Sue Coleman and Department of Public Safety officer,"
members of the Board of Regents, as Zeller said.
well as the UIR and WISE programs, "It is critically important for stu-
and that everyone he contacted was dents to speak up when they feel they
shocked and agreed that the remarks are being placed in a hostile situation
are "not welcome'in the University or environment without at the same
community." time having to be concerned that
Despite the support other adminis- there will be negative repercussions
trators have shown him, Griffin said for coming forward," he added.
he still feels uncomfortable at the Zeller also stated that diversity is an
idea of talkg to Sharp. integral part of both programs and that
"I would think that she would be both programs actively recruit diverse
more sensitive to how hurtful and students and emphasize the importance
dehumanizing statements of that of multicultural perspectives.
nature can be," Griffin said. "I would "As a community, we need to continu-
think Dr. Sharp would have knowl- ally conduct a self-examination as to
edge of how uncomfortable and hurt- whether we are doing enough to ensure
ing such questions are. They are now that all members are treated with the
feelings I know first-hand." appropriate respect and dignity that they
Griffin said he chose to make the should always be able to expect, espe-
comments public because he has cially in their contacts with University
heard of several other similar inci- staff," Zeller said. "We hold ourselves
dents occurring in Mosher Jordan accountable if we fall short of achieving
Residence Hall, but said many of the such values."
students who are victimized by hurt- Monts emphasized the need to
ful remarks choose not to talk about make events like this into an educa-
them for fear of retribution. tional experience.
"I would like this to start a dialogue "We should also be willing to
and to show people that it is not OK to allow space for people to learn
make these comments, as well as to about each other. We are not born
make people more open. You still see a with the cultural competencies
divide between racial lines, and I feel needed to be good citizens in a
that if you were to discuss more, they diverse society. Cultural competen-
wouldn't exist,"he said. cies are learned behaviors that we
Like himself, many of Griffin's acquired over time. So, as we make
friends are residential advisors in the mistakes dealing with one another,
residence hall or have research posi- let's allow the space to readjust and
tions through the Undergraduate learn how to deal with these issues
Research Opportunity Program. so that they don't reach crisis pro-
"I'm worried about my position portions."
but I hope that I'm living up to the Though Griffin's inciden.t
things I was taught in training. You're involved only people inside the
taught that comments like this are Mosher Jordan living-learning com-
not okay and you are taught to speak munities, Griffin and other minority
out against them, so I hope by speak- students said that the campus in
ing out, I am doing what I am trained general needs to be more cautious
to do," Griffin said. and aware of the effects comments
The University responded to the can have on individual students and
allegations with a written statement not be so accepting of racially-sen-
given to the Daily by Housing Direc- sitive remarks.
tor Bill Zeller. "I think it's very crucial that we
Though Zeller could not discuss as people, and ,we as individuals,
the michigan daily M

"If these comments
are true, this should
be a concern for
everyone in the
campus community."
- Lester Monts
Senior Vice Provost for Academic and
Multicultural Affairs
watch what we are saying, what
connotations we are making. I think
a lot of us speak without really
knowing the full connotations of
what we are saying," LSA sopho-
more Areej El-Jawahri said. "We
have to be sensitive to other peo-
ple's feelings because we haven't
gone through what they have expe-
rienced. We don't know how per-
sonal it is for them.
"This is no joke. Racial slurs are
not something to be laughed at. The
goal of our campus should be to
take this out of our system because
we really don't need it. We are all
capable of communicating in a way
that would show respect to other
individuals."
While El-Jawahri said most of the
time she has spent at the University
has been positive and filled with
good memories, she can relate to
Griffin.
But in her case, it wasn't a Uni-
versity faculty or staff member con-
tributing to her feelings of
discomfort. On Sept. 11 of last year,
El-Jawahri, who is Arab-American,
said she received a death threat via
e-mail.
"That moment was really a turning
point in my life. I felt alone, I felt
insecure, I felt that whatever I con-
tributed to my community didn't
really matter, and that is the worst
feeling anybody can ever have, espe-
cially at that point in time," she said.
"(Arab-Americans) felt unwelcome
in our own country."
But she said that despite her expe-.
rience, many of those around her
supported her and gave her hope that
other people's attitudes would
change.
"In the mix of this anger, you
could also see a lot of hope because
there were a lot of other Americans
who stood up and said, this is
wrong," El-Jawahri said.

HADDAD
Continued from Page 1
parts of Haddad's hearing if correct
procedure was followed.
"In doing so, they had to provide
facts to the judge and the judge had
to make a factual record of why it
was being closed," Moss said.
"Instead, the new judge just took the
government's word."
Moss added that the main reason
Edmunds ordered a new hearing for
Haddad was because a previous
judge had been too biased toward his
case. A new judge was asked to take
a neutral viewpoint.
"We are just asking the judge to fol-
low proper procedure," Moss said.
"You can't just trust what the govern-
ment says."
Mary Bejian, chair of the Washte-
naw County ACLU, said like most
Haddad supporters, she was first sur-
prised rather than angry Tuesday after-
noon when Newberry suddenly
ordered the hearing closed. Bejian was
waiting at the courthouse during the
hearing. "I was very confused because
my understanding was the government
had not followed the protocol set up for
them to request and get approval for
closing a hearing," Bejian said, adding
that none of Haddad's supporters raised
a fuss in the courtroom.
"Everybody followed the appropriate
protocol," she said.
She also said the ACLU simply
wants the immigration hearings to be
open and fair.
"What the ACLU objects to is the
blanket closure of all immigration hear-
ings. These cases should continue to be
dealt with on a case-by-case basis."
FOOD FOR THCUG- T
THE VIETNAM PROTESTORS
Yug rll, author of A
husand Tears Falling,
and daughter of North
Vietnam's ambassador to
Moscow, at one time told
sources that North Vietnam
was within four days of
surrender. However, the
protest movement forced a
halt to our bombing and
the war dragged on. Did
the protestors save or
cost lives?
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RHA
Continued from Page 1
Housing is planning to go smoke-
free in the residence halls," Winslow
said. "Technically, over 50 percent of
residents did support going smoke-
free and University Housing feels
that this is enough support to go
ahead and do this."
Some residents of East Quad were
unhappy with the possibility of smoke-
free resident housing, feeling that in an
attempt to promote an image of health-
ier living, the University is violating
student rights.
"Because it's not illegal and because

I'm paying for housing, I don't see why
I shouldn't be able to smoke in my
room;' said Joe Galante,.a sophomore in
the School of Natural Resources who
lives in a smoking hall in East Quad.
"Smoking is a part of the lifestyle you
live, and if you're going to be living in
the dorms for a year, you should be
comfortable," Galante added.
LSA sophomore Orin Mcintosh,
who lives also on a smoking hall in
East Quad said students who choose to
smoke in their rooms is not directly
affecting him.
"I don't even smoke, but I feel
like it infringes on our rights,"
Mcintosh said.

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ATTENTION
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISERS:
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WILL BE NO CLASSIFIEDS ON OCTO-
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FOR WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 16, ADS
MUST BE PLACED BEFORE 11:30 A.M.
ON FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11.

DISPLAY ADS:
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