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October 03, 2002 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2002-10-03

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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, October 3, 2002 - 7A

SAFE.
Continued from Page 1A
Jews respectively, presented their sup-
port of human rights for Palestinians
living in the occupied West Bank ter-
ritories.
"I would hope that there are more of
us in the closet dying to get out," Her-
skovitz said. "I think a travesty is hap-
pening in front of the world's eyes....
The travesty is the occupation and the
oppression of the Palestinian people at
the hands of the Israel Government."
Herskovitz expressed his opinions,
relating to his childhood growing up
as a Jewish boy in a primarily non-
Jewish environment. He talked about
riding a bus 10 miles to go to
Hebrew School, and expressing dis-
belief at other kids his age who
talked about Santa Claus. He said it
was his sister who taught him "his
first lesson in diplomacy," - that it

was fine to not believe in Santa
Claus as long as he respected the
views of those who did.
Herskovitz also said it is ridiculous
that at the border crossings in the
occupied territories that visitors need-
ed Israeli permission to go into the
West Bank. He added that Palestini-
ans will sometimes be detained for
several hours before they can pass
through a border.
"Would I have to ask somebody
from Canada to go to Mexico City?"
He added that the many suicide
bombings in Israel give the Israeli
government an excuse to make more
incursions into the West Bank.
"I think that the Israeli government
isn't upset with the suicide bomb-
ings," he said. "It all goes in Israel's
favor."
Both Herskovitz and Persico
talked about the "silent Jews" in the
United States and Israel who are

afraid to speak out in support of
Palestinians. Herskovitz said he
once talked to his cousin, who said
there were Palestinian childrens tel-
evision programs that taught chil-
dren to hate. Yet, when Herskovitz
visited the West Bank, he could not
find such shows.
"I watched children's program-
ming for eight days and I saw noth-
ing," he said.
Persico said there is an ideal view
among Israelis of what their coun-
try should be and how the leaders
should have unquestionable authori-
ty. But growing up, she was warned
by her mother, a Holocaust sur-
vivor, about the mistake Germans
made by following a charismatic
leader and not questioning their
government.
"My shock with the Israelis is we
have all turned into good Germans,"
she said.

Waiting and watching

BREAK-INS
Continued from Page IA
Despite that, he said he still thinks of Ann Arbor as a pret-
ty safe place and doesn't fear that the people who robbed his
home will return.
"This incident was so random, and it's not professional or
anything. I don't think we were cased or anything like that.
There is more stuff that could have been stolen," he said. "It
could have happened to anyone."
The Xbox and backpack were discovered in the Ann
Arbor Arts Center on Main Street last Monday, but the DVD
player is still missing, Conn said.
Ann Arbor Police Department Sgt. Angela Abrams said
the majority of the city's break-ins occur in the campus area.
"That's where everything happens," she said. "There isn't
the heightened security that there is in the areas where per-
manent residents live."
Abrams added that anybody who looks on a crime map
can see that robberies and break-ins cluster in student-occu-
pied areas.
Though official statistics are not available, crime maps
from recent weeks show that areas mostly occupied by stu-
dents regularly have more burglaries and attempted burgla-
ries than non-student neighborhoods.
Those areas include the roads between Main Street,
McKinley Avenue, Oxford Road, and Kingsley Street - a
relatively small geographical area in comparison to the rest
of the city.
From the period between Aug. 25 to Sept. 21, that area
has experienced a higher number of crimes than the rest of
Ann Arbor, defined as the area between M-14, US-23 and I-
94, much of which is highly populated.
For example, between Aug. 25 and Sept. 1 when
many students were moving into their new residences,
the people living in the campus area reported 14 bur-
glaries, while those living outside of it reported only 5
burglaries.
In the week of Sept. 1-7, the campus area had 16 burgla-
ries, the same number of burglaries that occurred outside of
the area. From Sept. 8 to 14, that ratio changed to 11 to 8,
and from Sept. 15 to 21, it was 14 to 8.
Overall, during those four weeks, the campus area had 55
burglaries, while the rest of Ann Arbor had 37.
Crime maps for the week of Sept. 21 to 27 are not yet
available.
Because their residents are constantly changing, student
residential areas don't participate in the Neighborhood
Block Watch Program that is popular in the rest of the city.
The lack of security and awareness in student neighbor-
hoods has made them a successful target for criminals for

"We don't think our doors
were unlocked, but living in a
house.,with six guys, it's quite
possible one of us went
upstairs and left the door
unlocked thinking that Ann
Arbor is a safe enough place,"
- Eric Hachikian
Music junior
years, Abrams said.
"Past success. I hate to say it, but that is why," she added.
A criminal's past success may have been the reason
why Music junior Eric Hachikian's house on Ann Street
has been broken into twice over the last three months.
People were home both times the house was broken into.
The first time occurred in July, when Hachikian and his
roommates were either in the basement or in upstairs bed-
rooms, leaving the ground floor unattended for several
hours. The second time was late last month, when again, the
ground floor was empty.
Both break-ins occurred sometime between 4 to 6 a.m.,
Hachikian said.
"We don't think our doors were unlocked, but living
in a house with six guys, it's quite possible one of us
went upstairs and left the door unlocked thinking that
Ann Arbor is a safe enough place," he said.
"It's one of those things where -if someone leaves the
door unlocked, it's not because they did it on purpose,
it's just that five minute period that someone is going
to the bathroom."
The thieves stole the house's Sony PlayStation 2, video
games, DVDs, clothes, a backpack and other entertainment
items in July.
The second break-in occurred after Hachikian's house-
mate bought a second PlayStation 2 and the thieves stole the
replacement.
"We have not bought a third PlayStation 2 out of
spite," Hachikian said, adding that, as far as he knows,
there are no suspects. "It pisses me off that, if it's other
students, they can't realize that we are all poor college
students and there is no reason-for them to come in and
take our entertainment away."

DAVID KATZ/Daily
Rackham student Monica Tutschka walks by an empty Gratzi patio on Main Street as waiter Erik
Proulx waits for customers yesterday.

FIRESIDE
Continued from Page 1A
to look into the building's maintenance.
She also said an initiativepis underway to reduce over-
crowding in the residence halls.
"More students want to live in residence halls and there is a
pressure that wasn't there five years ago;' she said. She added
that Vice President for Student Affairs E. Royster Harper has
hired a consultant to do an analysis of the need for a new resi-
dence hall and to evaluate the configuration of existing halls.
She said the report should be completed by spring.
Participants also expressed concern with the effectiveness
of Residence Hall advisors and urged the increase of com-
pensation for RAs. Coleman expressed interest in how advi-
sors are utilized by their residents. Coleman plans to
continue meeting with students through fireside chats
beyond this initial process of learning about the University.
"It is as important after five years as it is in the first two
months. Issues change and students have different ideas. I
can't assume anything and I have to keep hearing," she said.
"It was really interesting for me to hear why students

come here and the pride that they have, but they also alerted
me about some things - buildings that we need to look at
or that I need to know about, and the issue of computers and
the interest in wireless networks," she said.
Coleman, former president of the University of Iowa, was
appointed president of the University of Michigan in May
and has been serving full-time since Aug. 1. Participants
asked about her background and asked why she decided to
leave Iowa.
"When you are in my world, you realize that people look
to the (University) as a trendsetter, and that is exciting for'
me," she said. "I would not have left Iowa for anywhere
other than Michigan."
Students said they attended the chat both to have their
voice heard and to meet the president. Engineering senior
Stefan Bankowski said Coleman answered the questions
well but was worried that she might not follow through.
"She said she would look into it and ask questions about
it. But I wonder how much power she has to change things.
I would like to think she does, as a leader, have the power to
start these initiatives. Butit is a big university and it is hard
to get the ball rolling on a lot of this stuff," Bankowski said.

STEPH ENS
Continued from Page 1A
that did not function.
Other than saving the University
money by improving the efficiency of
construction projects, Stephens said he
has no other specific plans in mind. He
said he does not believe in making
changes "for changes' sake;' and instead
will evaluate the University's programs
and any possible improvements once he
is a regent.
Stephens said he supports the Univer-
sity's stance on the admissions lawsuits
and believes in the current policy of
diversity.
"The college experience benefits
directly from a broad cross-section of
society," he said.
He added that he believes the Life

Sciences Initiative will have a great
effect on the community, and he is excit-
ed about seeing it fulfill its potential.
In addition to representing the IBEW,
Stephens is also the secretary-treasurer
of the Washtenaw County Skilled Build-
ing Trades Council and serves on the
board of directors of the Construction
Unity Board.
Stephens is one of 10 candidates vying
for two positions on the University Board
of Regents in the Nov. 5 statewide gener-
al election ballot. The other candidates
are Democrat Ismael Ahmed of Dear-
born, director of the Arab Community
Center for Economic and Social Ser-
vices; current Regent Andrea Fischer-
Newman, an Ann Arbor Republican; and
GOP state Rep. Andrew Richer of
Grosse Pointe Park. Six third-party can-
didates are also running.

RELIGION
Continued from Page 1A
add another mass to our already exist-
ing one, so that we now have two
masses and soon we will be adding
another one. It's hard to say what rea-
sons are behind the increase," she
added.
Most students agree that last year's
terrorist attacks have not affected
their religious practices, but it has
lead them to include the people who
lost their lives and their families in
their prayers.
"My religion practices have not
changed, but I have prayed that we as
Americans can reach a state of for-
giveness, and that the families and all
people affected by the events of Sept.
11 may go on in life," Seibert said.

the michigan daily
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Looking for HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS
Men and women between the ages of 18 and
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time. You will be paid $190 to complete the
study. If you are interested please call
1-800-742-2300, #2322 to leave a message,
or e mail cjteter@umich.edu.

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MICHIGAN WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
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ATTENTION
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISERS:
DUE TO U OF M FALL BREAK, THERE
WILL BE NO CLASSIFIEDS ON OCTO-
BER 14"' 15 ", 2002. OUR EARLY
DEADLINES ARE AS FOLLOWS:
LINE AD:
FOR WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 16, ADS
MUST BE PLACED BEFORE 11:30 A.M.
ON FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11.

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