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October 02, 2002 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2002-10-02

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Wednesday
October 2, 2002
michigandaily.com
sportsdesk@umich.edu

abe Midiign fiI

7

Penn State frosh
. is multiple threat

After departing early,
Cammalleri demoted

By David Horn
Daily Sports Editor

You would think that a quiet
week would be enough to dismiss
coaches' concerns over a hotshot,
flash in the pan
newcomer. But if FOOTBALL
there is one guy
in the Big Ten Notebook
who is on every-
one's mind - especially Wisconsin
coach Barry Alvarez's (who's Bad-
gers have to deal with him this Sat-
urday) - it's Penn State's
do-everything backup quarterback,
Michael Robinson.
Robinson, a 6-foot-3, 231-pound
redshirt freshman out of Richmond,
Va., gives coach Joe Paterno's offense
yet another dimension of versatility.
Penn State was already loaded with
more legitimate offensive weapons
than most of its Big Ten competitors
when Robinson emerged on the scene
in the Nittany Lions' games against
Louisiana Tech and Nebraska. He
scored three times on three carries
against Louisiana Tech and added
another two touchdowns against
Nebraska. Robinson will line up any-
where - on the flank, in the slot, in
the backfield or behind center. Paterno
is comfortable using him to run (the
option, the reverse), to pass or to catch.
"It's obvious that he's a good
enough athlete that they want to get
the ball in his hands," Alvarez said.
"Anytime he takes the field you

have to be cognizant of all the
things he does and can do ... You
want to make sure you know where
he's lined up during the game, and
what he can do out of that particular
position."
But last week against Iowa,
Robinson's productivity was
stymied. The Hawkeyes keyed in on
the young quarterback, and limited
him to four carries for minus two
yards. But in so doing, Iowa freed
up all other aspects of the Penn
State offense.
"They have so many weapons, so
you can't overload on any one posi-
tion," Alvarez said. "That is an
offense that presents an awful lot of
problems because you can't over-
play one phase of it."
So MANY AWARDS, SO LITTLE TIME:
The Big Ten was noncommittal this
week in the distribution of Big Ten
Player of the Week honors. Two offen-
sive players - quarterbacks Brad
Banks of Iowa and Zack Mills of Penn
State - and two special teamers -
placekickers Nate Kaeding of Iowa
and Dave Rayner of Michigan State
- had to share the award.
It is no small wonder that the
Penn State-Iowa overtime marathon
produced so many honorees. Kaed-
ing connected from 55 and 47 yards,
and broke his own Iowa school
record of 13 straight field goals.
Banks set career-highs of 261
yards and four touchdowns, and
rushed for 41 yards to beat the Nit-

AP PHOTO
Penn State redshirt freshman Michael Robinson has shown his versatility in the
Nittany Lions' wins over Nebraska and Louisiana Tech.

tany Lions in overtime. Mills rallied
from 22 points down to tie the
Hawkeyes and send the game into
overtime. He set a Penn State record
with 399 yards passing.
Purdue safety Ralph Turner, who
returned an interception 23 yards
for the go-ahead touchdown against
Minnesota on Saturday, was named
the defensive player of the week.
'PATIENCE MONTY, CLIMB THE LAD-
DER': With five teams in the top 25
and Ohio State ranked among the
nation's elite, the Big Ten looks to
be in healthy enough shape. Coach-
es in the Big Ten don't seem wor-

ried about the supposed "drop off"
or "death" of the conference, but it
is clearly not getting much respect
nationally. On his ESPN Chat Wrap
yesterday, ESPN commentator and
former Auburn coach Terry Bowden
had this to say when asked if the
Big Ten was "back."
"I wish I could agree with you but
I'm not sure that this is true.
Although Ohio State, Michigan,
Iowa, Penn State are all in the hunt,
I don't see anyone that I think can
win a national championship. I
don't think until they do that there
can be a true comeback."

By Courtney Lewis
Daily Sports Writer
Mike Cammalleri thought he was
giving up his senior year at Michi-
gan to live his dream when he signed
with the Los Angeles Kings over the
summer. Suffice it to say, his dream
didn't involve Manchester, N.H.
But that's where the forward will
start the season after the Kings sent
him to their American Hockey
League affiliate Monday night,
when they trimmed their roster to
32 players.
"I thought I had a pretty strong
camp ... and thought I was progres-
sively getting better," Cammalleri
told the Los Angeles Times. "But I
guess decisions have been made."
Last season Cammalleri was
Michigan's top offensive player,
amassing 23 goals and 21 assists in
just 29 games. He served as one of
the Wolverines' alternate captains
and was named to the All-CCHA
second team. Cammalleri signed
with the Kings in late July, and at
the time, General Manager Dave
King told Los Angeles reporters
that Cammalleri threatened to play
in the Ontario Hockey League if
the Kings did not sign him. If Cam-
malleri had gone to the OHL, he
would have become a free agent
after this year.
Current Michigan senior John
Shouneyia, who counts Cammalleri
as one of his best friends, was sur-
prised that the former Wolverine
was sent down.
"He was doing pretty well up
there - the night before he got sent
down he had a three-point night -
so it was pretty tough to hear,"
Shouneyia said.
Shouneyia admitted that knowing
Cammalleri will be playing in the

minors when he could be helping
the Wolverines defend their CCHA
title stings a little bit.
"It definitely hurts, but he chose
to play professional hockey and I
wish him the best of luck,"
Shouneyia said, adding that Cam-
malleri is "going to make the best of
the situation."
Michigan coach Red Berenson is
one person who isn't surprised by
the Kings' decision, even though
they had told Cammalleri that he
would be on their NHL roster.
"The system puts these kids in a
vulnerable position," Berenson said.
"I think it was a bad move for L.A.
to start with, and unfair to the kid."
He added that Cammalleri "must
be devastated."
Michigan has lost six players to the
NHL in the last four years, including
Cammalleri and defenseman Mike
Komisarek, who also signed a pro
contract this summer after his sopho-
more season. Berenson has never
been a supporter of players leaving
school early, and Cammalleri's deci-
sion was no different.
"I just didn't think it made sense,"
he said. "I just don't think you give
up your senior year at Michigan to
play in the minor leagues."
Although Cammalleri's departure
left a sizeable hole in Michigan's
offense, Berenson said that's not
what he's concerned about right now.
"Our team is going to be fine
whether he's here or not. But I am
worried about the kid, what he's
going through ... and what he could
be going through," Berenson said,
alluding to Cammalleni's final year
of eligibility at Michigan. "You're
never going to get that back. You
can't buy it, you can't re-live it. So,
live and learn, but it seems like no
one's learning."

Alabama poised to upset Georgia in SEC clash

Adk"

By Nicholas Flees
For the Daily
While defensive powers Southern Cal. and
Texas A&M match up against
high-powered offenses, Georgia ACROSS THE
looks to go 5-0 for the first
time since 1982, a year in NATION
which the Bulldogs fell just one
win short of a national title, when it travels to
Tuscaloosa to take on Alabama.
No. 7 GEORGIA AT No. 22 ALABAMA, 3:30
P.M., CBS: This weekend marks the 62nd meet-
ing between the two schools, but only the fourth
time in the series that both teams are ranked.
And despite Alabama's 35-22-4 lead in the
series, Georgia has yet to lose a game on the
road with coach Mark Richt at the helm. Georgia
enters the game undefeated, having beaten its
last two opponents, Northwestern State and New
Mexico State, by a combined 69 points in spite
of quarterback David Greene's broken right
(non-throwing) hand. But despite their domi-
nance in the past two weeks, critics of the untest-
ed Bulldogs still remain.
Alabama (4-1) enters the game on a three-
the michigan daily

game winning streak, with its only loss coming to
No. 3 Oklahoma in a heartbreaker in Norman
four weeks ago. Despite a season-ending injury
to starting tailback Ahmaad Galloway, the Crim-
son Tide will look to exploit a weak Georgia
rushing defense (ranked 1lth in the SEC) with an
explosive ground game. Filling Galloway's void
will be Shaud Williams and Santonio Beard, who
each posted 100-plus-yard games last week
against Arkansas.
Each team is capable of getting the ball into
the endzone. This game could potentially come
down to the final possession. A victory over
Alabama this Saturday ought to silence Georgia's
critics, but considering the formidable challenge
posed by the Crimson Tide, it won't happen.
Alabama 34, Georgia 28
No. 18 SOUTHERN CAL. AT No. 17 WASHINGTON
STATE, 7 P.M.: Washington State plays host to
Pac-10 rival Southern Cal. Saturday. Having
scored 40-plus points in three of their five games
this season, the 4-1 Cougars boast an extremely
potent offense, led by Heisman Trophy hopeful
quarterback Jason Gesser. But the 3-1 Trojans
feature an equally dangerous defense, which has
given up just 11 points per game. Southern Cal.

enters the game on a high note, after a 22-0
shutout of Oregon State a week ago.
A key to this game will be whether the Cougars
will be able to establish a ground game to set up
Gesser and their passing game. Southern Cal.'s
solid running game could pose a problem for the
Washington State's defense, which gave up more
than 300 yards on the ground against Maurice
Clarett and No. 5 Ohio State.
Expect to see an evenly matched game. These
are two solid teams whose only losses have come
against ranked opponents, with Washington State
losing to Ohio State, and Southern Cal. losing to
No. 13 Kansas State.
Southern Cal. 24, Washington State 23
TEXAS TECH AT No. 23 TEXAS A&M, 2 P.M.:
Texas Tech is an underrated football team. The
Red Raiders enter Saturday's game with a 3-2
record, coming off a 49-0 annihilation of New
Mexico, with losses to No. 5 Ohio State and No.
16 North Carolina State. But despite Texas Tech's
offensive firepower, its defense has become a lia-
bility, as it has surrendered a combined 96 points
in its two losses.
Texas A&M has been impressive, but its three
See NATION, Page 8

6MNOTES

Wolverines name new
coach for water poio
Yesterday, the Michigan Athletic
Department announced the hiring of
Matt Anderson as
its new water polo
head coach.
Anderson spent
the previous season
as an assistantY
coach at Indiana-
Michigan's top "
water polo rival - '
and the previous
two seasons as an Anderson
assistant at San
Jose State.
While at Indiana, the team made
major steps for a young program,

improving from No. 20 in the nation to
No. 14. At Indiana, his duties included
recruiting and conditioning. During his
tenure at San Jose State, his alma mater,
the team achieved its school best
national ranking of No. 5.
"Michigan is an outstanding school
both athletically and academically,"
Anderson said. "Michigan has a history
of taking care of its Olympic sports and
I am looking forward to working with
the other coaches associated with
Michigan's great tradition."
He will be replacing Amber Drury-
Pinto, who stepped down from the
coaching position to become the head
coach at California.

- Staff reports

MENTORS: FEMALE, NON-SMOKING
Psych or Social Work students needed to work
with 11 year old emotionally impaired and 9
year old emotionally/mentally impaired girls.
Call 647-3297 (weekdays).
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MICHIGAN WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
Team walk-on tryouts will be Oct. 16, 7:00
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UM full time student. Current signed physi-
cals needed. Pre-registration required. Con-
tact Barb Donlan @ 647-2918.
NECK PAIN OR back pain? Health care in-
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Near U of M 734-994-5966.
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- T-. C- -iiA - - "I"A 1

SYMPOSIUM ON
ENERGYAND THE ENVIRONMENT
THE ROLE OF NUCLEAR POWER
OCTOBER 2-4,2002
A symposium addressing global energy issues, with
a focus on the role of nuclear energy in meeting the
increasing demand for energy supply, will be held on
October2-4 at the University of Michigan. The sym-
posium will feature prominent speakers discussing,
in an open fonum, global perspectives on energy
technology and policy as well as recent development
and challenges for advanced nuclear energy systems.
There is no registration fee for the symposium and
box lunches will be provided first-come first-served
for October 3 and 4. For further details for the sym-
posium, visit:
www.ners.engin.umich.edu/energy.symp
or contact: Cherilyn Davis Department of Nuclear
Engineering and Radiological Sciences 764-4260
brownsu@umich.edu
SYMPOSIUM PROGRAM
Opening Lecture: 7:30-9:00 p.m., Wednesday,
October 2, Hale Auditorium, Assembly Hall,
School of Business Administration
John P. Holdren, Harvard University:
Energy, Environment, the Human Condition,
and the Future of Nuclear Energy
With introduction by Rosina M. Bierbaum, Dean,
School of Natural Resources and Environment, Uni-
versity of Michigan. Reception to follow.
Welcoming Remarks: 8:15 a.m., Thursday, Octo-
ber 3,340 West Hall
Stephen W. Director, Dean, College of Engineer-
ing, University of Michigan
1 ,X .nX AT Xn - DA TDUDQ)VrrnrIP

11:00-11:45 Joan NL.Ogden, Princeton University:
Potential Roles for Hydrogen in the Future Energy
Systems
11:45-12:00 Questions and answers
2. NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND THE ENVI-
RONMENT
Thursday, October 3, 1:15-5:00 p.m.,
340 West Hall
1:15-2:00 Luther Carter, independent joumalist:
The Path to Yucca Mountain and Beyond
2:00-2:45 Margaret S.Y. Chu, DOE Office of
Civilian Radioactive Waste Management:
Yucca Mountain - U.S. Repository for High-Level
Waste
2:45-3:00 Coffee break
3:00-3:45 Lynn MI. Walter, University of Michigan:
Nuclear Fuel Cycle and the Carbon Cycle
3:45-4:30 David C. Wade, Argonne National Lab-
oratory:
Goals for Nuclear Energy Systems, and Fuel Cycle
Concepts Proposed for the Generation IV Roadmap
4:30-5:00 Panel discussion
5:00-6:00 Reception at Founder's Room, Alumni
Center
3. RISKS OF PROLIFERATION AND DIVER-
SION OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY
Friday, October 4,8:15-11:45 am.,
G906 Cooley Building
8:15-9-00 Richard L.Garwin, Council on Foreign
Relations:
Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons and Materials to
States and Non-State Actors: What It Means for the
Future of Nuclear Power
O"YlO"I i7,mfntnmnlo rnnn - a vnc

4. GENERATION IV ADVANCED REACTOR
DESIGNS
Friday, October4, 1:15 -5:00 p.m..
G906 Cooley Building
1:15-2:00 Robert Versluis, DOE Office of Nuclear
Energy, Science and Technology:
Challenges for the Generation-IV Advanced Nuclear
Energy Systems
2:00-2:45 Patrick Ledermaun, Commissariat
d l'Energie Atomique:
Reseach and Development of Future Energy Sys-
tems
2:45-3:00 Coffee break
3:00-3:45 Yoshio Kani, Japan Nuclear Cycle
Development Institute:
Design Study on Advanced Fast Reactor Cycle Sys-
tem in Japan
3:45-4:30 Laurence L.Parme, General Atomics:
Advances in Modular Helium Reactor Technology
4:30-5:00 Wrapup session
RUMMAGE SALE First Baptist Church, 512
E. Huron. Friday, Oct.4,9-5 & Saturday
Oct. 59-1.

ATTENTION
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISERS:
DUE TO U OF M FALL BREAK, THERE
WILL BE NO CLASSIFIEDS ON OCTO-
BER 141" £i 15", 2002. OUR EARLY
DEADLINES ARE AS FOLLOWS:
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