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September 30, 2002 - Image 12

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The Michigan Daily, 2002-09-30

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4B - The Michigan Daily - SportsMonday - September 30, 2002

MICHIGAN 45, ILLINOIS 28

GAME STATISTICS

Team Stats
First Downs
Rushes/Yards
Passing Yards
Offensive Plays
Total Offense
Return Yards
Comp/Att/lnt
Punts/Avg
Fumbles/Lost
Penalties/Yards
Time of Poss

MICH
20
40/143
272
79
415
61
23/39/0
6/41.3
1/1
2/20
32:09

ILL
29
35/1 75
368
84
543
65
25/49/3
3/39.7
4/2
5/55
27:51

M' struggles early against no-huddle
Healthy Bellamy finally emerges as receiving threat with season's first touchdown

M I C H I G A N

PASSING
Player
Navarre
Brinton
Totals
RUSHING
Player
Perry
Underwood
Askew
Bracken
Bellamy
Navarre
Totals
RECEIVING
Player
Joppru
Bell
Bellamy
Edwards
Massaquoi
Askew
Totals

C-A
22-37
1-2
23-39

Att
22
6
4
5
2
40
No.
7
4
1
23

PUNTING
Playerf
Finley
Brabbs
Totals
KICKOFF RETURNS
Player No.
LeSueur 2
Totals 1
PUNT RETURNS
Player' No.
Curry, J. 2
Totals 2

DEFENSE
Player
Hobson
LeSueur
Kaufman
McClintock
Curry, J.
Drake
Combs
Jackson
June
Shazor
Shaw
Stevens
Williams
Kashame
Rumishek
Dudley
Woods
Avant
Underwood
Curry, M.
Massey
Lazarus
Casseus
Spytek
Watson
Reid

Yds
90
29
15
13
8
-12
143
Yds
74
51
37
101
8
272
No.
5
6
Yds
49
49
Yds
12
12
Solo
6
5
3
3
4
3
2
2
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
Yds
21
O
0
0
0
0
0
67

Yds
264
8
272
Avg
4.1
4.8
3.8
2.6
8
-6.0
3.6
Avg
10.57
10.2
7.4
25.25
8
1
10.4

Yds Avg
213 42.6
35 35.0
248 41.3
Avg Lg
24.5 25
24.5 25
Avg Lg
6 8
6 B
Asst
2
1
3
5
2
0
1
2
2
2
0
1
1
0
0
0
O

TD
4
O
4
Lg
15
15
6
9
8
0
15
Lg
27
15.
9
42
8
1
42

mnt
O
0
TO
TD
2
0
0
0
0
0
2
TD
2
O
0
0
4
Lg
51
35
51
TD
0
O
TD
0
O
Tot
8
6
6
6
5
4
4
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
1.
1
1
1
1
1
TD
TO
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

By J. Brady McCollough
Daily Sports Writer
CHAMPAIGN - Michigan players knew that Illi-
nois' offense would be tough to stop. They didn't
know there wouldn't be enough time to breathe
between plays.
Illinois' no-huddle offense turned Michigan's sup-
posedly vaunted defense into a
unit characterized by no-tackle, FOOTBALL
no-penetration and no-coverage Notebook
in the first quarter. The Fighting
Illini racked up 202 yards of total
offense on just 28 plays and were able to do whatever
they wanted against a tired Michigan defense.
"They came out fast," Michigan linebacker Victor
Hobson said. "They caught us off guard a little bit."
Illinois mixed up its play-calling out of the no-hud-
dle, running the ball for more than 6 yards per carry
while spreading three and four wide receivers across
the field.
"They were spreading the defense out and running
the ball, which is a good scheme for what we were
running," Hobson said. "I have to give them credit for
that. They were kind of nickel-and-diming us with the
run."
"I think a lot of times we expected pass, and they
hit some draws on us," defensive tackle Grant Bow-
man said.
With Illini backs Carey Davis and Antoineo Harris
running at will, Illinois quarterback Jon Beutjer vic-
timized Michigan with multiple play-action fakes,
giving him time to throw to open receivers down
field.
"They were doing a good job with the fakes on the
play action," Hobson said. "It was just a matter of
people being out of position at the wrong time, biting
on the fakes a little too much."
The "people" Hobson spoke of were the Wolver-
ines' safeties, who were burned on Walter Young's 51-
yard touchdown reception on a perfect play-action
fake by Beutjer. Beutjer missed another sure touch-
down when he overthrew receiver Greg Lewis on a
similar play fake later in the first quarter.
After Illinois' 13 first-quarter points, it did not
score again on Michigan's first unit. But it wasn't
because the Illini stopped moving the football, as they
still finished the game with 543 yards of total offense.
Illinois turned the ball over five times, shooting itself
in the foot and giving Michigan all the momentum.
The Michigan safeties were the key to the Wolver-
ines' "bend but don't break" performance, adjusting
to the Illinois play action by staying at home and then

sacking Beutjer with well timed blitzes.
"I think basically we just relaxed more and sat back
and waited for them to bring the ball to us instead of
trying to be so aggressive," safety Julius Curry said.
"Sometimes, our aggressiveness puts us in bad situa-
tions."
Michigan sacked Beutjer three times - all on safe-
ty blitzes.
"It's very exciting to get around the ball," Curry
said. "(The safeties) always like to come down in the
box so we can make plays."
SPIN CYCLE: With Marquise Walker's graduation
last season, Michigan receiver Ron Bellamy said it
was his time to take his place in the Michigan receiv-
ing "cycle."
But Bellamy was missing in action in the Wolver-
ines' first four games. While Braylon Edwards and
Tyrece Butler racked up 22 and 16 receptions, respec-
tively, Bellamy had just four catches for 41 yards.
Saturday, with his shoulder fully healthy, Bellamy
started the game, catching five balls for 37 yards,
including a six-yard touchdown on a fade route.
' "It's a receiver's dream to have a one-on-one and
have a fade route called," Bellamy said.
Bellamy and Calvin Bell, who caught five passes
for 51 yards, took advantage of a dramatic slide in
playing time for Tyrece Butler. After having problems
with drops during the past two games, Butler played
only in relief of Bellamy and in garbage time.
SPLIT DUTIEs: After Michigan kicker Philip Brabbs
missed two more field goals at the end of last Satur-
days 10-7 win against Utah, bringing his total to 3-
of-9 on the season, Michigan coach Lloyd Carr was
admittedly looking for answers.
Saturday, the answer was junior Troy Nienberg,
who had previously missed his two field goal
attempts against Washington and Western Michigan.
Nienberg, a' sophomore transfer, made all six extra
point attempts and hit a chip-shot 21-yard field goal
in the fourth quarter.
"Troy kicked the ball very well in practice (last)
week," Carr said. "He's been consistent from the very
beginning. He doesn't have the range Philip has, but
Troy is a very calm, self-possessed guy. He's earned
an opportunity, but I thought Philip did a great job
kicking the ball off and did a great job on the fumbled
kickoff."
Carr said that while Nienberg will handle extra
points and shorter field goals, if a long field
goal opportunity had presented itself.
against Illinois, he would have gone with
Brabbs, who has handled all of Michi-
gan's kickoffs this season.

"You have to remember that there are a couple of
ways to look at this," Carr said last Monday at the
weekly media luncheon. "Philip Brabbs has kicked
two game-winning field goals here. Is he kicking as
well as we would like? No, but you just have to
have faith and confidence that it will get bet-
ter."
ON THE ROAD, AGAIN: Michigan
cornerback Marlin Jackson picked
off two Beutjer passes, bring-
ing his total for the season to
three - all coming on the
road.
"It's fun making plays in
other people's stadiums," Jack-
son said. "They don't like it,
but I enjoy doing it."
Jackson, by far the
most consistent mem-
ber of the secondary
this season, was:
excited to get some
help Saturday from
his teammates, as
senior safety Charles Drake picked
off the first pass of his career.
"Everybody made plays today.
not just me, but Julius and Drake.. .
and Cato, so it made it a lot easi-
er." Jackson said.
INJURY UPDATE: Defensive end.
Shantee Orr sat out Saturday s
game along with defensive
tackle Norman Heuer. Orr hurt 'NI
his right knee against Utah
giving sophomore defensive , a
end Alain Kashama a :
chance to get serious
action for the first time
in his career.
Carr would not
comment on
either injury.

.

DANNY MOLOSHOK/Daily
Michigan cornerback Markus
Curry fights for the ball against
Illinois wide receiver Brandon
Lloyd.

PASS DEFENSE
Player
Jackson
Drake
Rumishek
LeSueur
Shazor
Kashama
Watson
Totals

Int
2
0
0
0
0
O
3

Lg
19
46
0
0
0
0
0
46

Brk-up
3
1
2
10

Michigan offense finally executes, spreads ball all around

By Joe Smith
Daily Sports Editor

IIIln o is

PASSING
Player
Beuter
Totals
RUSHING
Player
Davis
Harris
Virgil
Beutjer
Totals
RECEIVING
Player
Lloyd
Lawis
Davis
Young
Moorehead
McClellan
Totals

C-A
25-49
25-49

1

Att
13
7
6
9
35
No.
10
4
4
3
3
25

PUNTING
Player .
Minnes
Totals
KICKOFF RETURNS
Player No.
Virgil 3
Total 3

PUNT RETURNS
Player
Wilson
Totals
DEFENSE
Player
Sinclair
Schumacher
Williams
Jordan
Hall
Bevis
Wilson
Kautter
Strong
Schaefering
Jackson
Taylor
Maths
Brosnan
Morton
Myers
Pashos
Gomez
Ruffin
Gawelek
Tischer
O'Brien
Haywood
Diehl
Davis
PASS DEFENSE
Player
Wilson
Schumacher
Strong
Gilstrap
Totals

No.
1
1

Yds
68
56
42
9
175
Yds
156
44
42
78
35
13
368
No.
3
3
Yds
63
63
Yds
2
2
Solo
7
5
5
S
3
2
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
0
1
Yds
0
0
0
0
O
O

Yds
368
368
Avg
5.2
8.0
7.0
1.0
5.0
Avg
15.6
11.0
10.5
26.0
11.67
13.0
87.77
Yds
119
119

TD
2
2
Lg
11
24
14
11
24
Lg
46
17
16
51
15
13
51

Int
3
3
TD
O
0
TO
1
0
TD
1
0
2

CHAMPAIGN - After watching
his offense abnormally going air-
borne early and often in the first
half, Michigan coach Lloyd Carr
seemed confused about what team
he was actually coaching.
"I wasn't sure if this was Michi-

Avg Lg
39.7 53
39.7 53

Avg Lg
21.0 36
21.0 36

Avg
2.0
2.0

gan football or the arena league,"
Carr said.
Carr referred to the fact that the
Wolverines passed the ball on 19 of
their first 25 plays from scrimmage
- what looked like an obvious
change from Michigan's traditional
smashmouth style of establishing
the run, then running again.
But the Wolverines concede it

wasn't anything scheme-wise that
they changed with their offense
from the previous four games, as
they didn't abruptly alter their style
to an attacking "spread offense."
Instead, Illinois practically dared
Michigan to pass by showing eight-
or nine-man fronts and linebacker
blitzes, and the Wolverines took
what they were given. They exploit-

Lg
2
2

Asst
4
4
3
0
2
2
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
O*
1
1O

TD
t O
t O
TD
! O
! O
Tot
11
9
8
5
5
4
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
TO
0
0
0
0
0
O
O

ed the vacated middle of the field
with crossing routes, finally execut-
ing their offense.
"We had an answer for every
defense they showed us," quarter-
back John Navarre said.
When Navarre went to the air, his
receivers held onto the ball - and
often made plays by gaining a lot of
yards after the catch. Michigan
sophomore receiver Braylon
Edwards had more than 70 YAC by
himself. Michigan had just. two
drops on the game, both coming in
the first series, and the Wolverines'
lone turnover came at the end of the
game on a David Underwood fum-
ble as Michigan was running out
the clock.
"It's so important to take care of
the ball," captain Bennie Joppru
said. "Because when you turn it
Over, it gives the other team touch-
downs."
Just ask Illinois. Michigan cashed
in nearly every time Illinois turned
the ball over, with the Wolverines
translating Illinois' five giveaways
into 24 points. Interceptions and
runbacks by Michigan's Marlin
Jackson and Charles Drake gave the
offense the ball inside Illinois' 30-
yard line on three occasions. That's
when a more efficient Michigan
offense cashed in.
Carr pointed out how well
Navarre managed the game, han-
dled blitzes and spread the ball
around to different receivers - four
receivers had at least four catches.
The Wolverines seemed to solve
their inadequacies on 3rd down, as
they were a much improved 10-17,
including several 3rd-and-longs.
And unlike previous games, Michi-

gan was nearly automatic in the red
zone, scoring on 6-of-7 opportuni-
ties deep in Illini territory.
F "We were clicking on all cylin-
ders today," senior receiver Ron
Bellamy said.
A symbolic representation of
Michigan's execution came on its
first drive of the third quarter.
Instead of sitting on a comfortable
28-13 lead and playing it safe, the
Wolverines showed a killer instinct
as they embarked on their most
complete drive of the season. That
12-play, 88-yard drive effectively
balanced, the run and the pass, fea-
tured two key 3rd-down conversions
and culminated in a 6-yard touch-
down reception by the emerging
Joppru.
"That touchdown changed the
complexion of the game, and I
thought it was tremendously well
executed;' Carr said.
Carr said Navarre's 21st start on
Saturday was his best ever, and
lauded the junior signal caller for
connecting with his third receiving
option five or six times and correct-
ly checking off to the right audible.
Granted, Michigan's offense
clicked against a struggling Illinois
defense that gave up 38 points in a
loss to San Jose State a week prior.
But players said the game showed
the potential of the "new offense"
when it is executed properly.
"The offense gives every receiver
a chance to get the ball," Bellamy
said. "I was telling (offensive coor-
dinator Terry Malone), if we can
continue to do that, this offense will
be unstoppable, because we have so
much talent at the receiver posi-
tion."

DANNY MOLOSHOK/Daily
Michigan tight end Bennie Joppru dives for the goalline against Taman Jordan of Illinois. Joppru had two touchdowns on the day.

int
O
O
O
0

Lng
O
0
0
0
0

Brk-up
3
1
1
6

PLAYERS OF THE GAME:

ILLINI
Continued from Page 113
Carr said. "There's always people
out there who are perfect and expect
perfection, but John Navarre has
done a damn good job."
Navarre connected on 22-of-37
attempts for 264 yards and a career-
high four touchdowns. The offensive
line held, and despite early problems
holding onto the football, Navarre's
receivers got open and made plays
after the catch. Braylon Edwards
caught four passes for 101 yards,
and made two impressive runs
through the Illinois defense after the
catch. Senior captain and tight end

Navarre the go-ahead on those
plays.
"Early in the game they were real-
ly stacked in there, but you know
me: I'd run it in there anyway, just to
soften them up a bit," Carr said.
After Illinois scored in the first
quarter to cut the Michigan lead to
one, the Wolverines went on a tear,
scoring the next 31 points before
putting in their second unit and
relinquishing two meaningless Illi-
nois touchdowns. Included in that
31-0 rout was a third-quarter drive
that was Michigan's most successful
of the year (12 plays for 88 yards in
6:07 minutes).
It was a game in which maybe all

'Slash' Brabbs
Michigan kicker Philip Brabbs has
been more than the long-distance
specialist. If he could make field
goals outside of practice, he might be
the Michigan MVP. Here's what
Brabbs has done thus far for the
Wolverines:
Near touchdowns: Last weekend
against Utah, Brabbs set up for a 27-
yard field goal. Instead of taking a
shot at it, holder John Navarre hand-
ed the ball off to the kicker, who
scrambled for seven yards and a first
down. In the fourth quarter against
Illinois on Saturday, Brabbs recovered
a fumble on his kickoff and came a

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