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September 19, 2002 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2002-09-19

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IRAQ
Continued from Page 1A
concealed evidence of its weapons
programs in a labyrinth of tunnels and
other elaborate hiding places, certain
to complicate and prolong any new
inspection effort.
While United Nations officials in
New York prepared for the inspectors
return, the United States and Britain
began working on a new resolution
aimed at authorizing use of force should
Baghdad fail to comply with U.N. Secu-
rity Council resolutions.
Western diplomats said the U.S.-
British draft would likely include new
instructions for weapons inspectors
and a timetable for disarmament that
would be tighter than one laid out in
an existing resolution passed in
December 1999.
U.S. officials said they did not intend
to let Iraq's maneuver blunt their efforts
for such a resolution. "I see nothing to
suggest that the timing has changed for
what the United Nations Security Coun-
cil is considering," said Bush press sec-
retary Ari Fleischer.
Still, Iraq's invitation to give inter-
national inspectors unfettered access

The Michigan Daily - Thursday, September 19, 2002 - 7A

to ,suspected weapons sites after a
four-year absence divided the Securi-
ty Council and prompted the White
House to step up its pressure on both
allies and Congress.
"Only certainty of U.S. and U.N. pur-
posefulness can have even the prospect
of affecting the Iraqi regime," Rumsfeld
said.
"It is important that Congress send
that message as soon as possible -
before the U.N. Security Council votes."
Rumsfeld testified as the White
House put the finishing touches on its
proposed congressional resolution.
The White House plans to give it
to lawmakers as early as today. It
would give Bush maximum flexibil-
ity to confront the threat posed by
Saddam's weapons of mass destruc-
tion, and includes much of the lan-
guage found the 1998 law calling
for a regime change in Iraq, a sen-
ior White House official said.
Outlining the administration's
case, Rumsfeld told the House
panel: "No terrorist state poses a
greater and more immediate threat
to the security of our people and the
stability of the world than the
regime of Saddam Hussein in Iraq."

LS'
Continued from Page IA
Construction of the Life Sciences
Institute is expected to be completed in
fall 2003. The $100 million facility is
part of the $700 million Life Sciences
Initiative that will allow scientific col-
laboration between researchers of vari-
ous disciplines.
"The institute is really a different
kind of approach to science because of
the idea we will house, in a single unit,
scientists from different fields. The idea
that they are in proximity to each other
could help solve important problems,"
Saltiel said. "It will allow us to make
the kind of advances that are not ordi-
narily made."
Saltiel said he would work to recruit
scientists from the top levels of many
different disciplines.
The first of these scientists are six
"charter faculty" who will help to
form the direction of the Institute.
They include chemistry Prof. Carol
Fierke, genetics and internal medi-
cine Prof. David Ginsburg, chemistry
Prof. Gary Glick, biology Prof.
Daniel Klionsky, pathology Prof.
John Lowe.

PETERS
Continued from Page 1A
said the attorney general's office
usually involves itself with local
prosecutions only if criminals strike
in multiple counties or if conflicts
of interest arise.
"The attorney general has a great
range of responsibilities, and the
criminal prosecution is important
but a very small part of the office,"
Mackie, a Democrat, said.
Peters said corporate accountabil-
ity is also high on his agenda, and
explained he will focus on "crack-
ing down on (chief executive offi-
cers) and companies who play fast
and loose with their books and
jeopardize their employees' pension
plans."
The next attorney general needs
to coordinate attorneys who special-
ize in corporate law to better attack
the growing problem, he said.
Peters said his legislative record
shows he is also committed to work-
ing for a clean environment, one of
the other points in his campaign for
attorney general. "I'm passionate
about protecting the Great Lakes."

CANCER
Continued from Page 1A
gernail, it's very hard to pick up, and
doesn't make symptoms."
Lung cancer takes many years to
develop, but changes in the lungs can.
begin almost immediately as a person
is exposed to carcinogenic substances.
A few abnormal cells may appear in
the lining of the main breathing tubes
soon after exposure occurs.
If a person continues to be exposed
to the cancer-causing substance, more
abnormal cells will accumulate, lead-

ing to the possible formation of a
tumor.
Symptoms of advanced lung cancer
include chronic cough, hoarseness,
coughing up blood, weight loss and
loss of appetite, shortness of breath
and chest pain.
Each year the number of Americans
who die from lung cancer outnumbers
the deaths of colon, prostate, breast and
ovarian cancers combined. Last year
alone approximately 157,400 Americans
died of lung cancer, while more than
165,000 were diagnosed.

NmTING.1.0.DO.TONIGHT?...
COME TO A MAS$..EETNGI WRITE
.#EW., SORTS, ARTS, EDrT.$.R.TAKE
PiciU RES.. WE DOT ALL.
.42 . ..YNARD $T. (NEmT T..... T. E
.TUDENT ACTnVrEs BUILDING)

LAWSU ITS
Continued from Page IA
and undergraduate cases. Both John Payton and
Mahoney clarified legal issues and highlighted the
national importance of the pending decisions.
Attorneys for the intervenors were also invited to
clarify their parties' interest in the cases.
Miranda Massie, attorney for the intervenors in the
Law School case, said she had three goals - to make
sure what is at stake involves fundamental questions of
democracy, to show affirmative action is a step toward
fairness and to increase activism.
"In a society as segregated as ours it shouldn't be a
surprise that we still have gaps to address," she said.

Ted Shaw, attorney for the intervenors in Gratz v.
Bollinger, the case challenging the College of Litera-
ture, Science and the Arts, said although the Univer-
sity of Michigan has defended the use of affirmative
action better than any other university, there are cer-
tain things it isn't going to argue.
"We want to put into the record the history of this
institution's past discrimination," he said.
The only student on the panel, LSA Student
Government President Monique Luse, offered a
unique perspective, while vocalizing her support
for affirmative action policies.
She said if the University admissions policies
were found unconstitutional, "the welcome mat at
the door of higher education would be pulled out

JOBS
Continued from Page 1A
said.
Jan Dryden, figure model supervisor
in the School of Art, said that people of
all ages and body types are encouraged
to apply.
"It takes a particular type of person to
feel that they can handle this type of
job," Dryden said.
University alum Ronnie Order's
undergraduate years were spent as a
museum docent at the University's
Exhibit Museum of Natural History. His
job required him to give guided museum
tours and answer questions from visiting
elementary and middle school students.
the michigan c
Have experience in customer
0 service? Want a job that will
look great on a resume?
4-~ Test
Prep
is hiring Student Advisors to
assist students and perform basic
clerical tasks. Weekday/Sunday
hours available. Please fax resume
to 734-662-2910 or email
marie_hughes@ m .com
FALL EXPANSION - Vector Marketing has
several positions in customer service/sales as
well as receptionist/clerical positions avail.
$14.05 base/appt. conditions exist in customer
service/sales. As seen on CNN/CNBC. Flex-
ible schedules. Fun and professional work en-
vironment. Advancement opportunities; man-
ager & six assistants are UM students or grads!
Call 944-1223. www.workforstudents.com.
GYMNASTIC INSTRUCTORS FOR pre-
school thru high school classes. Days &
evenings, some gymnastic experience neces-
sary. Must have own transportation. Jobs be-
ginning Sept.5. Gym America 971-1667.
HEALTH CARE ASSISTING chiropractor
with patients, billing & typing. $8/hr. P/T flex.
994-5966.
MICHIGAN BASEBALL IS seeking a paid
manager for '02-'03 season. Call 647-4550 and
ask for Helen.
MICHIGAN TELEFUNb
Now hiring students for flexible night and
weekend schedules. Fun work atmosphere
and great job experience.
Earn $7/hr plus nightly bonuses.
Apply online or stop by 611 Church, Suite 4E
www.telefund.umich.edu. 998-7420.
MULTICULTURAL FAMILY HEALTH
Initiative seeks interns in many fields incl.
models/ extras for videos. Join in helping oth-
ers and make a difference. Send resume/ letter
of interest to Healthy Lifestyles, PO Box 4056
Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Info. mtg. on W
8/28/02, 6:30 p.m. (and last W of every .), St.
Joseph Hosp. 5305 Health Education Ctr.
Bldg. (same bldg. as Personnel & Med Inn),
2nd fl, Rm. #6. No phone calls please.
PROFESSOR SEEKS HOUSE CLEANER.
3 hrs. each wk., 1.3 miles from campus. Start
$9.00/hr. elias@umich.edu. 668-8818.

Order's favorite part of the job - pay
starts at $7 per hour - was getting kids
excited about science through teaching.
"Being in the museum atmosphere is
by far the best part of it," Order said.
"You're constantly surrounded by
knowledge."
Exclusive of the work-study program,
many students have also earned money
as paid research participants. Research
trials in the Department of Psychology
and Medical School frequently call for
people to serve as researc subjects,
which can pay participants anywhere
from $7 to $300, depending on time
commitment and intricacy of the testing.
Kinesiology junior Phil Hoffer par-
ticipated in a psychology study on
daily

"Since then a
attitude towa
my own nudit
changed total
- Ka
Ann Arbor resident, n
Asian men which requir
complete a series of tests
tionnaires.
"It's a good amount of mo
a lot of work. It only took t

from under us. It would be a loss not-only in numbers,
but in idealism;' she said.
Despite the overwhelming support of the Universi-
ty's admissions policies by members of the panel, there
were some in the audience who were not as positive.
"Preference given to people based on the color of
their skin is wrong now and is wrong still," philosophy
Prof Carl Cohen said. "They are manifest violations of
the unambiguous language of Title VI (of the Civil
Rights Act)."
The deadline to file a brief of opposition in the Grut-
ter case is Oct. 15, and outside counsel for the Univer-
sity said the Supreme Court should decide whether it
will hear the case by mid-November. A decision in the
Gratz case is still pending in the appeals court.
my time;' said Hoffer, who was recom-
ny pensed with $25. "It's better than most
jobs since it's only a one-time thing."
ird The Student Employment website
also offers jobs which are non-Uni-
Y versity positions. A number of post-
11 ings for non-profit community
service agencies and businesses in
atie Ripple the Ann Arbor area make up a size-
able portion of opportunities listed
ude model on the website.
Work-study is a federally based finan-
cial aid program. In order to qualify for
ed him to work-study, students must complete the
and ques- Free Application For Student Aid and
demonstrate financial need. Financial
ney for not need is not required to apply for tempo-
wo hours of rary positions.

Learn about energy conservation efforts
on cam s and how you can help!
Envoyy lest 2302

***CHILD CARE NEEDED for two great
boys. Tues. - Thurs. 3-6:30 p.m. Must have a
car & experience. 994-5441.
AFTER SCHOOL CARE sought for two
young boys, five days a week. Transportation
a must. Please call 975-9045.
CHILD CARE NEEDED 2 afternoons, possi-
ble eves. Close to campus. Call 994-3361.
CHILDCARE/DRIVER FOR 12 & 14 YR.
olds. Must have car & enjoy children. Hrs.
flex. Call 761-3261.

SPRING BREAK '03 with Student~ity.com!
The ultimate vacation in Cancun; Bahamas,
Mazatlan, Acapulco, Jamaica and more! Pack-
ages include airfare, 7 nights hotel, FREE
FOOD, FREE DRINKS and 150% Lowest
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15 friends and get hooked u-p with 2 FREE
TRIPS and VIP treatment! Also earn extra
cash and bonus prizes just for promoting Stu-
dentCity.com! Call 1-800-293-1445 or e-mail
sales@studentcity.com today!
STUDENT TIXS WANTED UM vs MSU
football. 619-517-7879.
keitheyob@yahoo.com.
WANTED! SPRING BREAKERS! Sun
Coast Vacations wants to send you on Spring
Break 2003 to Cancun, Acapulco, Mazatlan,
Jamaica or the Bahamas for FREE! Call us
now at 1-800-795-4786 or email us at
sales@suncoastvacations.com!

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 19
11:00 A.M. - 2:00 P.M.
CENTRAL CAMPUS DIAG

OVERTURE AUDIO IS looking for a part
time staff member to work 15-20 hrs./wk. The
hours we need filled will be on Mon. and
Wed., with hours avail, on Sat. as well. Call
Keith, at 662-1812.
REAL LIFE LIVING SERVICES is accepting
applications for Direct Support Staff working
with people with disabilities. Great for people
w/experience in OT, PT, ST, Psych, Social
Work, Nursing, Human Services! $8-$9/hr.
Applicants must be 18 yrs. of age, possess
valid unrestricted drivers license and have a
H.S. diploma/GED. (734)222-6076. EOE.
RESEARCH VOLUNTEERS NEEDED.
Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the
emotional brain. Volunteers are sought for a
study using magnetic resonance imaging to un-
derstand brain function. Volunteers should be
between ages 18 and 55, healthy and able to
lie in an enclosed space for 60-90 min. Com-
pensation from $50-100 for a 2-3 hr. session.
Email westbrk@umich.edu if interested.
SCOREKEEPERS IS NOW HIRING Cooks,
Floormen and waitstaff for immediate open-
ings. Bring your class schedule and apply to-
day at 310 Maynard A2 - Across from Borders
Books Downtown. 995-0100.
SEEKING EXPERIENCED BABYSITTER.
For 20hrs/wk in afternoon or evenings. Must
have driver license and ref. 994-4703.
STOCK KEEPER, P/T Temp. position for
UofM warehouse operation. Immed. opening,
T,W, Th. 12-4. F 8-12, $8.00/hr., call Steve at
764-2470 weekdays 8am-4pm, req. resume.
TEACHING ASST. IN Family Housing
Child Development Center. Multicultural set-
ting, PIT. Call Diane 764-4557.
UNION ORGANIZER: F/T to start 11/1.
1-yr. contract. Organizing grad. employee lo-
cal. Excellent interpersonal skills, written com-
munication skills, and willingness to work
flex. hours req'd. Organizing exp.. commit-
ment to labor movement, and familiarity with
University setting desirable. Salary $39k/yr. +
benefits. Resume and cover letter to:
Graduate Employees Organization, 527 E.
Liberty, Ste. 205, Ann Arbor, MI, 48104-2242
(734) 995-0221. e-mail

Live Music

**Prizes

SG i veaways

LIKE KIDS AND DOGS? Looking for p/t
nanny, to care for our 2 YR. old son. T, Th,
11-5, must have own vehicle to transport child
from nursery care, ref(s). please. 424-9629.

$250 A NIGHT potential/bartending training
provided. 1-800-293-3985 ext. 607.
NECK PAIN OR back pain? Health care in-
tro. 4 Chiropractic treatments $75.
Near U of M 734-994-5966.
SEARCHING FOR E?
www.searchle.org

I

Sponsored by the Utilities and Plant Engineering
Dep artment and the Center for Sustainable Systems
Doctors i n
the area are
AST HMA
conducting RESEARCH
ST UDY
2 asthma
studies - -
comparing two marketed
medications

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! UMICH SPRING BREAK...ARE YOU GO-
ING?-Then GO DIRECT! LOWEST price,
FREE drinks,Meals,Insurance! Campus REPS
WANTED! Organize a group & travel FREE!
800/367/1252 www.springbreakDIRECT.com
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ECURRENT.COM: ANN ARBOR'S best
entertainment website. Music, cinema, stage!

THE PERFECT ROOMMATE seeks same.
International airline pilot, travels half the
month, looking for responsible, mature female
grad student to share new 3,100 sq. ft. house
with a deck at the polo fields. 15 minutes to
campus. Club has workout facilities, pool, ten-
nis. Own room with private bath. Dog lover a
plus. Call Bob 734-769-8810.

You may be eligible for one or both studies if you are:
" Generally healthy with the diagnosis of asthma
* 18-80 years old
" Use of an albuterol or similar inhaler
(Proventil®, Ventolin®)
" Not a current smoker or have not smoked more
than a pack a day for more than 10 years
* Available to complete 9-10 visits over
approximately 4 months for short-term study
or 15-16 visits over one year for long-term study
f Study-related physical exams, breathing tests, ECG's,
study medication at no charge
A 1 1*. ; "F rnl-nc n 1'rr

DO YOU WANT A
COOL JOB?

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