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September 05, 2002 - Image 19

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The Michigan Daily, 2002-09-05

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14B - The Michigan Daily - KICKOFF 2002 - Thursday, September 5, 2002

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The Michigan Daily - KICKOFF 2002

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SCOUTINC THE NATION

NoT so

FAST

NEW TERRITORY
TYRONE WILLINGHAM, NOTRE DAME:
After what Bob Davie's Irish teams
put them through, Notre Dame fans
will be happy with just about any-
thing above .500, liven their treach-
erous schedule. Willingham's
straight-shooting, honest style
proved to be the right medicine for
the ailing program this past Satur-
day against Maryland, as his Irish
stunned the Terps, 22-0. Duplicating
that performance won't be so easy.
RON ZOOK, FLORIDA: Try replacing
God. Then try replacing former
Florida coach Steve Spurrier. Odds
are, you'll be wishing that you were
filling God's shoes pretty quickly.

Zook will have the toughest job in
the country this year - taking over
for a man who was the epitome of
Florida football. But he does have a
Heisman candidate in Rex Gross-
man to get him through his first
season in charge.
GERRY DINARDO, INDIANA: There are a
lot of differences between coach-
ing at Indiana and leading an XFL
team onto the field. But there is
one glaring similarity: In each posi-
tion, Dinardo enjoys fans who truly
don't care about whether his team
wins. This is a stark contrast from
his tenure at LSU, where the fans
drove him out of town after two dis-
mal seasons. At least he has the
excuse of having fewer than 50
scholarship players this season.

BUDDY TEEVENS, STANFORD: Pass,
pass and pass some more. The
Stanford game plan will run some-
thing like that, if you throw in some
X's and 0's. Teevens was on Spurri-
er's offensive braintrust, so odds
are, the man will be able to use the
talents of quarterback Chris Lewis
and receivers Teyo Johnson and
Luke Powell.
CHAN GAILEY, GEORGIA TECH: The Yel-
low Jacket faithful will be very sus-
picious of any new coach after
what happened with former coach
George O'Leary, who lied on his
resume. Gailey will probably have
to go through random drug tests.
But he does have a solid pedigree
after a head coaching stint with
America's Team and Jerry Jones.

PLAYERS YOU'RE SURE TO
FIND OUT ABOUT
CARNELL WILLIAMS, RB, AUBURN:
Williams, a sophomore running
back, is rated as one of the top 10
running backs in the nation by The
Sporting News. Williams, who is
known as "Cadillac," looks to lead
the Tigers' ground game and hopes
to follow in the footsteps of great
Auburn backs like Bo Jackson and
Stephen Davis.
TAYLOR JACOBS, WR, FLORIDA: Jacobs, a
senior wide receiver, had eight
receptions for 246 yards and two
touchdowns in Florida's opening
game rout of UAB. With the loss of
last season's talented receivers,
Jabar Gaffney and Reche Caldwell, it
is Jacobs' turn to step into the lime-
light and be Rex Grossman's go-to-
guy.
MAURICE CLARETT, RB, OHIO STATE: All
of the hype surrounding this true
freshman proved to be warranted as
he rushed for 175 yardsand three
touchdowns in his debut for the
Buckeyes.
DERRICK JOHNSON, OLB, TEXAS:
Johnson was named last year's
Freshman of the Year by the Sport-
ing News. In his first game of this
year, he had 12 tackles for the

Longhorns and was named the Big
12 Defensive Player of the Week.
TEDDY LEHMAN, ILB, OKLAHOMA: Start-
ed all 11 games last year and was
the Sooners' third-leading tackler.
Lehman will look to step up and lead
the defense this year with the loss
of Butkus Award winner Rocky Cal-
mus and Jim Thorpe Award winner
Roy Williams.
CLARENCE FARMER, RB, ARIZONA: This
junior running back rushed for 1,323
yards and 10 touchdowns last sea-
son. Farmer will need to have a
breakout year if John Mackovic's
Wildcats want to make any noise in
the Pac-10.
JASON FIFE, QB, OREGON: Fife, a junior,
steps into the starting lineup this
season after backing up standout
Joey Htarrington, who has moved on
to the NFL. Fife is a big, athletic
guy who can scramble as well as
throw in the pocket. In his debutat
the helm, Fife threw for 166 yards
and three touchdowns.
BRET ENGEMANN, QB, BYU: Engemann
is a 6-foot-4 junior who threw for
386 yards and three touchdowns in
BYU's win over Syracuse. He
received the Mountain West Confer-
ence's Offensive Player of the Week
Award and looks to lead BYU to a
big season.

ESPN College Football analyst Lee Corso chats with
Daily Sports WriterJ. Brady McCollough about video
games, Marlin Jackson and the plight of the Big Ten

STAFF PICKS
Preseason
selections
Michigan final record
Michigan final AP ranking
Big Ten champion
Big Ten second place
Big Ten third place
Surprise Big Ten team
Surprise Michigan loss
Michigan MVP
Heisman winner
National Champion
National Runner-up
ACC champion
Big 12 champion
Big East champion
Pac-40 champion
SEC champion
Mid-major threat
Most overrated

kw
Jeff David
Phillips Horn

Joe
Smith

10-3
13
Ohio State
Michigan
Michigan State
Penn State
Minnesota
Marlin Jackson
Ken Dorsey
Miami (Fla.)
Tennessee
Florida State
Oklahoma
Miami (Fla.)
Oregon
Tennessee
Utah
Nebraska

J. Brady
McCollough
10-3
11
Ohio State
Michigan
Michigan State
Purdue
Purdue
Chris Perry
Chris Simms
Texas
Tennessee
Florida State
Texas
Virginia Tech
Oregon
Tennessee
Brigham Young
Nebraska

10-3
12
Ohio State
Michigan
Michigan State
Iowa
Minnesota
Marlin Jackson
Ken Dorsey
Tennessee
Oklahoma
Florida State
Oklahoma
Miami (Fla.)
Washington
Tennessee
Colorado State
Southern Cal.

11-2
8
Michigan
Ohio State
Penn State
Penn State
Minnesota
Braylon Edwards
Onterrio Smith
Oklahoma
Miami (Fla.)
Florida State
Oklahoma
Miami (Fla.)
Oregon
Florida
Fresno State
Georgia

GUNNING FOR THE HEISMAN

i

THEY'RE FOR REAL
Rex Grossman, JR, QB, Florida
Why he can do it: The runner-up to
last year's award as just a redshirt
sophomore, Grossman is the frontrun-
ner in the race entering this season.
The Bloomingtonnative ran former
coach Steve Spurrier's wide-open
attack with a flare that reminded
many of Heisman Trophy winner Danny
Wuerffel.
What could stop him: Will new coach
Ron Zook's new offense pack as
much fun into the "Fun 'N' Gun?"
Ken Dorsey, SR, QB, Miami (Fla.)
Why he can do it: It takes just two
words - senior quarterback. Five of
the last 10 Heisman Trophy winners
have been senior signal-callers and
eight of the last 10-have stayed all
four years. Dorsey is a National Cham-
pion, a leader and a model of efficien-
cy in Larry Coker's scheme. With
Andre Johnson and Ethenic Sands plus
a stable full of runners, Dorsey has
the personnel to put up monster num-
bers and win a second national title.
What could stop him: The Canes
boast the toughest nonconference
slate in the country, visiting Florid;a
and Tennessee and hosting Florida
State.
Chris Simms, SR, QB, Texas
Why he can do it: Simms may have
more natural ability than Grossman
and Dorsey. The lefty's athleticism is
unquestioned, and the players that
surround him are some of the best at
their position in the country.
What could stop him: To say that
Simms has not been clutch in big
games is an understatement. If
Simms doesn't perform well and
knock off the Sooners this season, he
can kiss the Heisman - and a nation-
al title - good-bye.
Dahrran Diedrick, SR, RB, Nebraska
Why he can do it: Diedrick was a huge
factor in Nebraska's re-emergence as
a national power last season, rushing
for more than 1,300 yards and 15
scores even though he split carries
with Heisman winner Eric Crouch and
Thunder Collins. Without Crouch,
coach Frank Solich will count on
Diedrick to move the football, espe-
cially in the early part of the season
when starting quarterback Jammal
Lord is learning the ropes.
What could stop him: If there was one
thing that Diedrick didn't do last sea-
son it was break long runs, as his
Ion est scamper oft he seasorrwas
for 8 yards. Diedrick must break
some big runs in some big games.
Also, the fact that a Cornhusker won
the award last season will undoubted-
ly hurt him.

THEY NEED A FEW BREAKS
Jason Gesser, SR, QB, Washington St.
Why he can it: Gesser led the
Cougars back onto the national col-
lege football radar screen last season,
ta in advantage of an open offensive
attack and tons of talent at wide
receiver to throw for 3,010 yards and
26 scores.
What could stop him: Gesser's small
market of the Northwest will make
him relatively unseen by most of the
country.
Charles Rogers, SO, WR, Michigan St.
Why he can do it: Rogers' natural abil-
ity to make big plays is simply baf-
fling. As Jeff Smoker's right-hand man
last season, he dominated opposing
corners with his uncanny combination
of size and speed, catching 14 touch-
downs and amassing 1,470 yards.
What could stop him: The state of
Michigan knows what he can do, but
will the rest of the country take
notice?
Anthony Davis, SO, RB, Wisconsin
Why he can do it: As a redshirt fresh-
man last season, Davis broke onto the
scene to rush for almost 1,500 yards
and 11 touchdowns while continuing
the string of Badger 1,000 yard rush-
ers. With a mammoth offensive line in
front of him, the production will only
increase.
What could stop him: When Lee Evans
returns, he could steal Davis' thunder
very quickly.
Onterrio Smith, JR, RB, Oregon
Why he can do it: Smith, a sophomore
juco transfer last season, split carries
down the middle with the graduated
Maurice Morris, rushing for 1,088
yards, and now will handle the bulk of
the load.
What could stop him: Smith may need
a 2,000 yard season to emerge as a
legitimate candidate, and once quar-
terback Jason Fife becomes comfort-
able, the Ducks will go to the air.
ON THE OUTSIbE, LOOKING IN
Chris Brown, JR, RB, Colorado
Brown showed flashes of brilliance
last season in the Buffs' ground
attack, rushing for 16 touchdowns.
Cedric Benson, SO, RB, Texas
As a true freshman last season, Ben-
son earned the starting role at mid-
season, rushing for over 1,000 yards
and 12 touchdowns.
Eli Manning, JR, QB, Mississippi
All over Mississippi, the song 'Eli's
coming" is dominating the radio
waves. If his arrival gives Ole Miss the
SEC West title, he'll contend for the
Heisman.

The Michigan Daily: So you put
the Husky hat on Saturday ...
Lee Corso: Yes, I did. I thought
Washington would win the game. I
thought Michigan would be powerful
and strong, but I just thought the
speed of Washington would beat them
in the end, but I was wrong. That was
a classic game.
TMD: What did you see from
John Navarre against Washington?
LC: I thought he has some poten-
tial, he threw the ball straight some-
times. And it looks like to me, if he
continues to play like that, he's going
to get better and better every game
this year. He put some really good
shots in. There were a couple of pass-
es at the end of the game that he hesi-
tated on, but overall I thought his
performance was very good.
TMD: Marlin Jackson pretty
much shut Reggie Williams down.
Were you impressed?
LC: That guy Jackson is a good
football player. I saw him get banged
up a few times, but he kept coming
back in, so I thought in that matchup,
Jackson won it. He's got to be a heck
of a player to beat that Reggie
Williams.
TMD: Are we headed for another
controversial finish in the Bowl
Championship Series?
LC: I don't think anybody is going
to go undefeated. It looks like there is
too many good football teams out
there. For right now, the rules are the
rules. They have the human element
with the polls and they've got these
"computers" figuring out the .other
part, so it looks like this is as good as
we're going to get for a while. Let's
play it out and see.
TMD: When you hear play-
off and college football men-
tioned together, what comes
to your mind?
LC: The presidents don't
want to do it, so you're not
going to do it. You might as
well quit talkingE

about it.
TMD: New Year's Day was an
embarrassing one for the Big Ten.
Where does the Big Ten fit in now?
LC: We go all over the country, and
what I think I see is that there is more
speed and quickness and better quar-
terbacks in the other leagues. They
have great quarterbacks who throw
the ball well. The Big Ten doesn't
have many great quarterbacks. There
is more speed on defense on these
other teams in the country. Michigan
looked good today, but they needed
six defensive backs to do it. The line-
men weren't really quick.
TMD: Is it a recruiting problem
for the Big Ten? Are the schools not
reaching the South and the West
Coast enough?
LC: They reach there, but the guys
don't want to leave there anymore.
Why would you want to jump over
five states when there are five good
schools around where you live. I think
that's the case. They don't get enough
of these guys from the speed states
because a lot of those guys would
rather stay close to home. When
Michigan and Ohio State were so
good, they could get anybody they
wanted to, but now they aren't as
good as some of these other places
who are winning all the time.
TMD: Talk about the chemistry
between ou and Kirk Herbstreit on
the set.
LC: It's natural. We have a tenden-
cy to not see eye-to-eye because of a
difference in generation. I'm old
enough to be his father, so therefore, I
think differently and I have a lot more
life experiences that I can relate to.
He has more contact with the players,
because he understands;them
better. It's just a natural sit-
uation.
TMD: When did you
decide to start picking
teams by putting on a
hat?
LC: We went to Ohio
State, and Brutus -the Buck-
eye, I was going to pick
Ohio State, and Kirk
said, "Why don't
you put that son of
a bitch's head on?"
and I said, "Yeah,
wouldn't that be
great." Well he
asked his fiancee at

Finally, they let me do it. Well, I put
that hat on and everybody went crazy.
Since then, I've been picking with the
hat on.
TMD: Do you ever sit back and
think, "I have the best job in the
entire world?"
LC: I don't have a job, I have a
privilege. I get a chance to give back
to college football some of the things
it gave me.
TMD: A lot of people wonder
about the video game, NCAA Foot-
ball 2003 ...
LC: I haven't seen it.
TMD: You haven't seen it?
LC: No, Kirk says it's terrific.
Everyone we talk to says it is. But I
don't know how to play it. He plays it
all the time. Somebody, sometime is
going to have to show me how to play
it.
TMD: How involved are you with
the making of the game?
LC: Not at all. I just go off and
read. They've got 30 guys working
full time on that game. They've got
some geeks in there, I tell you. They
know everything about football. They
study tapes of us, because when I go
read this stuff, they have me saying
"Yo, hey sweetheart, good-bye, not so
fast," all that stuff. That's how it hap-
pens.
TMD: What's the most obscene
thing anyone has ever said to you?
LC: I just block it out. I just keep
walking and smile.
TMD: What school has the best
fans?
LC: Nebraska has the best fans in
college football because they respect
the way the game is supposed to be
played. They have respect for not only
their team, but their opponent. When
we have a show, unlike other places,
they listen. They understand.
TMD: How do you think the Big
Ten race is going to shape up?
LC: I thought Ohio State would be
the first team leading, and I still think
Ohio State has a nice defense. But I
like Michigan now. It'll come down to
Michigan and Ohio State. Everyone
else likes Michigan State, but they
always stumble.

By David Horn
Daily Sports Editor

Across cultures, the rose connote
a myriad of symbolic meanings. In
the culture of contemporary Michi
gan football, its meaning is singular
The expectation.
Since the Michigan football clas
of 1975 lost to Oklahoma in the
Orange Bowl, just two Michigan
graduating classes have failed to
play in Pasadena on New Year's Day
This class, which came to Ani
Arbor with the 1997 Rose Bowl and
National Championship fresh in it
young mind, is trying not to be the
second-straight class to come and go
without smelling the Roses.
To do so would not be particularl:
surprising, but would also not be
without struggle, challenge and
accomplishment. This is a team tha
has played just one New Year's Day
bowl game anywhere outside o
Orlando (Miami, New Orleans
Tempe, Ari. and Pasadena would be
the preferred locales) in the five
years since the '97 Rose Bowl, and
See ROSES, Page 13E

Former Michigan tight end Bill Seymour
went to the Rose Bowl after the 1997 s
~i
Blue sen:
yet to snr

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