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January 13, 2003 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, January 13, 2003 - 7A

HSSP
Continued from Page 1A
science and medicine courses, students in the program also
have the opportunity to interact with health care practition-
ers. O'Grady said the program - which currently houses
100 students - had only 60 last year, and has set a cap of
150 students for next fall. LSA sophomore and second-year
HSSP member Kristen Leutheuser said the move not only
allows for more space, but also the advantage of having co-
ed floors, an option not feasible in Markley this past year
due to an increase of students in the program and Markley's
layout.
"I think a lot of the problems that we had this year was
because of the fact that we were segregated by gender,"
Leutheuser said, adding that during the 2001-2002 academ-
ic year, all HSSP students were able to live together. With
halls divided by sex this year, the students were not able to
form as much of a tight-knit circle. "Lloyd is going to be a
better place to live."
O'Grady said both living-learning communities are excit-
ed about the possible program collaborations between
health sciences and the humanities.

"We will have some programs in cooperation. ...There's the
whole interface of ethics and societal issues and health."
- Michelle O'Grady
Health Science Scholars Program Faculty Director

"We will have some programs in cooperation," O'Grady
said. "There's the whole interface of ethics and societal
issues and health."
Marjorie Horton, LSA assistant dean for undergraduate
education, said other residence halls were looked at as a
possibility for HHSP's new location, but would have
required renovations not feasible given the budget.
LHSP students said they hope the newly formed relation-
ship with HSSP will help increase the racial diversity in
Alice Lloyd, a problem in recent years. According to a study
done by LHSP members last year, only 8.3 percent of LHSP
students were from minority groups, down from 32 percent
during the 1994-1995 academic year.
But according to current plans made between LHSP

associate Director Charlotte Whitney and HSSP Program
Manager Wallace Geenser, the two programs will be housed
separately. As of now, HHSP will take over four floors in one
of Alice Lloyd's four houses and one floor in another house.
Whitney could not be reached for comment yesterday on
LHSP's logistics for housing next year.
"It's two separate programs and they're still different,"
Hutchins said, adding she was sure students would have
plenty of space around the residence hall to mix. "I'm sure
that (the programs) would have something for both groups
to get together."
Although the LHSP is used to having the entire residence
hall to itself - including special facilities like a writing
center and dark room - O'Grady said Whitney and

Geenser have collaborated to ensure each program has ade-
quate office space with very few changes and that each pro-
gram gets sufficient time and space for classrooms and
seminars. But she did acknowledge there could be a few
bumps during the transition.
"I think there will be change and sometimes change can
be very stressful, but if we didn't think it was possible to
meet both programs' needs, then we wouldn't have chosen
(Alice Lloyd)," O'Grady said.
Presently, approximately 46 percent of Alice Lloyd's
population consists of non-LHSP students. Even with
the new influx of HSSP students, Horton said there
would still be room in Alice Lloyd for a "critical mass"
of students not enrolled in either program.
Students in both communities said they were not
consulted about last week's decision. Both Potter and
Horton said student input was not necessary in the
decision-making involved.
"This isn't a decision that moves anywhere but at the
administrative level," Potter said.
"We felt it was a decision that could be made well by
the administration. We weren't considering a large
amount of options at all," Horton said.

CONFERENCE
Continued from Page 1A
University's Dearborn campus spoke
about the arrogance of the U.S. when it
* comes to foreign policy.
"We must do something about the
arrogance of (the) U.S.," Thomson said.
"We must also cut the defense budget by
at least 15 percent."
On Sunday, denoted as "Activate" day,
11 workshops were held to teach atten-
dants on political activism, its history
and influence in U.S. foreign policy.
"Sunday was more about how to actu-
alize and turn knowledge into action,
and have a forum," Sussman said.
"It was to inspire and really make
people take part in something than just
listen and think"
Hiba Ghalib, MSA member and event
organizer, said she was pleased with the
outcome of the conference.
"I was really happy with the
turnout," Ghalib said. "I thought it was
a success."
ECONOMY
Continued from Page 1A
enrollment data, graduate and pro-
fessional school enrollment at the
University rose by 5 percent during
the fall 2002 term.
Engineering senior Chen Ma,
who has applied to graduate
school, is among those who hope to
use the extra degree to secure a job
next year.
"I was trying to look for a job,
but with the current economic situ-
ation, I'd rather attend graduate
school and wait another year to see
if the job market will improve," Ma
added.
the michigan c

AUTO SHOW
Continued from Page 1A
said. "If I spend $500 more on gas, that's not going
to do anything to terrorism."
Even General Motors, who plans to release a line
of hybrids in late 2003, placed more emphasis on
its new sport truck, the Envoy XUV, than on its
innovations in the hybrid sector.
"I would buy a hybrid. I'd even be willing to pay
say, $3000 extra, if they made it in a minivan," said
Roger Wilkinson, who resides in Pontiac. "I have a
family, and I need at least a van. A car this small
doesn't cut it," he added.
But few people denied that fuel-saving
technology will be widespread - and neces-
sary - in the future. Mercedes is currently
polishing up its fuel cell technology, an envi-
ronmentally friendly form of propulsion that
uses hydrogen instead of gasoline. The Ger-
man automaker will test 60 fuel cell-powered
vehicles this year, and plans to put fuel cell
cars into full production in 10 years.

"Economically, it's better," Mercedes spokes-
woman Leigh Ramos said. "From a consumer
standpoint, all the inflation of gasoline (prices)
wouldn't matter."
"(Hybrids) definitely makes sense for the
future," said LSA sophomore Elizabeth Mekaru.
"It will be nice to know you're not killing the
environment."
This year, no manufacturer plans to release
any hybrid vehicles larger than a compact car.
However, Ford is making a hybrid version of
its Escape SUV - which averages 35 to 40
miles per gallon - for 2004. Lexus, the only
luxury manufacturer to release a hybrid, will
release the "green" version of its RX series
SUV within three years.
The show, which has been held in Detroit every
year since its inception in 1907, attracted 759,907
people in 2002. It's annual Charity Preview raised
more than $6.125 million last year for Detroit-area
children's charities.
"Overall, the auto show was amazing," Jain said.
"I really enjoyed the experience."

MLK
Continued from Page 1A
discussions so that project leaders can commiserate
and form partnerships.
The symposium will take place this month and
next month at the University to celebrate the
life and teachings of King through a series of
programs and initiatives facilitated by academ-
ic departments and student groups throughout
the University. Programs will focus on diversi-
ty and current social issues.
Today's lecture on cultural diversity by
Ronald Takaki, the author of "Strangers from a
Different Shore," commences the MLK sym-
posium. Upcoming events include a speech by
cultural critic, author and feminist theorist bell

hooks and a keynote speech by activist.and
writer Grace Lee Boggs.
Karis Crawford, program associate for the
Arts of Citizenship Program, said while their
discussions have always brought together differ-
ent facets of the University and the Ann Arbor
community, Friday's event involved an especial-
ly diverse group.
"This is the kind of boundary-crossing that we're
trying to do," said David Scobey, director of the
Arts of Citizenship Program.
Crawford said those involved with the pro-
gram have always had to work with diverse
communities.
"We never start out saying, how can we make
this multicultural, we just do it," she said about
their projects.

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Venezuelan protesters continue to oppose Chavez

CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) - Soldiers
lobbed tear gas at tens of thousands of Venezue-
lans marching on a park near a military base to
demand the armed forces' support in the ongoing
strike against President Hugo Chavez. Nineteen
people were injured, including one photographer
who was hit by rubber bullets.
Opposition protesters regrouped as the gas
clouds lifted, shouting "cowards" at hundreds of
soldiers facing them with armored personnel car-
riers. Troops also kept back dozens of Chavez
supporters protesting nearby.
The first marchers to arrive at Los Proceres
park, which is outside the Fort Tiuna military
base, stomped down barbed wire blocking the
entrance, but they did not try to break past
security lines.

Hector Castillo, a photographer for the local
newspaper El Mundo, was injured by rubber bul-
lets that some soldiers fired into the air, Caracas
Fire Chief Rodolfo Briceno said. Eighteen other
people were treated for asphyxiation, he said.
The park is one of eight security zones in
Caracas as decreed by Chavez. Protests are
banned in those areas unless authorized by
the defense ministry.
"All of this show of force is absurd," said Hen-
rique Capriles, the opposition mayor of an eastern
Caracas district. "People are tired of being
assaulted and repressed."
The military - purged of dissidents after a
brief April coup - has supported Chavez during
the strike, which has paralyzed the world's fifth-
largest oil exporter but has not rattled the presi-

dent's resolve to stay in power.
Troops have seized oil tankers, commandeered
gasoline trucks and locked striking workers out of
oil installations. Top commanders have professed
their loyalty to the government.
Speaking in his weekly radio and television
address on Sunday, Chavez dismissed opponents
as "fascists" manipulated by the media.
He also dismissed Infrastructure Minister
Eliecer Hurtado, a retired general, and
replaced him with Diosdado Cabello, the cur-
rent interior minister. Chavez did not explain
the change or say who would head the interi-
or ministry, which commands the federal and
secret police forces.
Venezuela's main television stations are not
broadcasting any commercials except opposition

advertisements promoting the strike. Media own-
ers say they have been pushed into this stance
because Chavez incites followers to attack
reporters.
Chavez threatened to revoke the broadcasting
licenses of television and radio stations if they
"continue with their irrational insistence on
destabilizing the country by supporting this fas-
cist subversion."
Venezuela's largest labor confederation, busi-
ness chamber and opposition parties began the
strike Dec. 2 to demand that Chavez resign and
call early elections if he loses a nonbinding refer-
endum on his rule.
The National Elections Council"scheduled the
referendum for Feb. 2 after accepting an opposi-
tion petition signed by 2 million people.

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BARTENDER TRAINEES NEEDED
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COMPUTER CONSULTANT I : The Divi-
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Support Staff. This position would begin Jan-
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16th. Duties include: Helping to install, main-
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limited hardware support by replacing and in-
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have lots of fun while working w/ young chil-
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scheduling required. F/T, overnight staff
needed. $10.20/hr. Fill out an applic., or send
resume to Ozone House, 1705 Washtenaw,
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AFTER SCHOOL CARE sought for two
young boys, 3-5 days a week. Transportation a
must. Please call 975-9045.
BABYSITTER NEEDED IN our west side
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day evening per wk. Need car and love of
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CHILD CARE & light housework, T&Th.
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req. $10/hr. Call Sally at 665-0257.
LIVE-IN NANNY NEEDED in our Burns
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& 2 yr. old children in exchange for apt. Call
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NANNY W/ DRIVING exp. 21 hrs./wk.
$11/hr. ref(s). req., fax resume to
(734)663-0135.
PART TIME CHILDCARE workers and
mentors for youth w/emotional problems. $8-
12/hr. Transportation required. Male workers
in high demand. Next training Feb. 1. Call
Carolyn 971-9605.

WANTED *SPR./SUM. INTERNS must be
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