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March 19, 2003 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2003-03-19

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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - 7

STUDENTS
Continued from Page 1
between countries and cited French
disapproval of war as one example.
Gabrail, who has family in Baghdad,
said he doesn't have a single family
member who is against the war. "I
want people to realize that Iraqi peo-
ple's concerns are how to get rid of
Saddam," he said.
El-Jawahri said Iraqis are prepar-
ing for war. "A lot of my family
don't feel threatened - they have
seen a lot of war in the past 27 years
of Saddam," she said. She added that
her family members are trying to
stock up on food, gas and supplies
for war.
She said many Iraqi youth are being
deported to southern Iraq to fight
ERRORS
Continued from Page 1
felt doctors' fatigue contributed to
risks in the healthcare industry.
"I know transplant surgeons work
incredibly long hours. If you're sleep-
deprived as a physician, you're more
likely to overlook things and make
mistakes," Winfield said.
Like any other profession, there is
a learning curve for medical stu-
dents, but healthcare providers said
they felt that did not contribute sub-
stantially to medical errors. Naseer
Ahmad, endocrinologist at Provi-
dence Hospital in Southfield, said he
felt that healthcare providers at the
lower level of the curve were more
careful and more worried about mak-
ing a mistake.
Ahmad said that poor handwriting is
often the cause for medication mis-
takes. With many medications holding
similar names, poor handwriting and
error on the part of the pharmacist
could have serious consequences.

against the United States. "There is a
lot of talk among youth that when they
see U.S. troops they will drop their
weapons," she said.
Gabrail said it is hard to tell what the
people of Iraq actually think because
of restrictions on speech in the regime.
He told the story of his father's med-
ical school professor in Iraq who spoke
out against Saddam Hussein and disap-
peared overnight.
"If you try to say something in
Iraq, it's dealt with immediately,"
Gabrail said.
Ghalib said it is difficult for her
family to get information about life
in Iraq from relatives still living
there. "They're not really allowed to
speak about anything political. We
don't really know what's going on,"
she said.
Technology is being used to prevent
such errors. Ahmad said there are lap-
tops available on the floor where he
works so that doctors can just click on
a medication instead of having to write
out a prescription.
Many hospitals are also starting to
use electronic records so that medical
information is accessible faster. Tech-
nology is also available so that the
records come with prompts that will
bring certain aspects of the records to
the physician's attention. For example,
if a dosage of medication seems too
high, a prompt will come up on the
screen asking the healthcare provider
to check the prescription.
The University Medical Center
has already begun to use electronic
records and University Health Ser-
vices is looking to acquire the tech-
nology sometime in the next five
years, Winfield said.
"No profession is mistake-free, but
in medicine the risks are more costly,"
Ahmad said. "We are trying all the
time to minimize these risks."

BRIEF
Continued from Page 1.
and GPAs than 69 minorities rejected
during the same period.
CIR spokesman Curt Levey said
some exceptions exist in each
admitted class, but "on average
(admissions officers) subject whites
and Asians to a much more rigorous
standard."
He said while the Law School con-
siders many factors other than grades
and LSAT scores in its policy,
minorities would only be dispropor-
tionately admitted if on average they
performed better than whites across
other admissions factors.
"The huge discrepancies can only
be explained if minorities perform
much better than whites and Asian
on those other factors," Levey said.
"But I don't think the University is
claiming that blacks and Mexican-
Americans write much better
essays"
The University's brief also said
when administrators drafted the poli-
cy in 1991, they took precautions to
ensure the policy would not "author-
ize, require, or encourage admissions
officers to admit a predetermined
number of minority applicants."
As evidence that the Law School is
not employing a secret quota, the
brief cites statistics showing that
minority enrollment does not hold
steady, ranging from 13.5 to 20.1 per-
cent from 1993 to 2000.
Levey said that in the last four years
minority enrollment has fluctuated from
only 13.5 to 13.7 percent, but Krislov
said the composition of the applicant
pool cannot be expected to vary greatly
across a four year span.
Even if CIR successfully proves the
University is giving a significant plus
factor to blacks, Hispanics and Native
Americans, it still has to convince the

Minority enrollment Powell: 45 countrks
has fluctuated, ranging
from 13.5 to 20.1
percent from 1993 to supp0at U a ctio.s
2000.1rA

court that race is receiving too much
weight. The University's brief says
the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals
ruled the Law School could not enroll
meaningful numbers of minorities by
placing less weight on race.
Race-blind admissions would pit
a handful of black applicants
against thousands of whites with
similar test scores and GPAs. In
2000, only 26 blacks in the entire
nation had a 3.5 GPA and 165
LSAT score, while 3,173 whites and
Asian Americans achieved similar
results, the brief said.
"If you don't consider race as one
factor among many, than because of
the pool size ... you would have a
devastating drop in the number of
minority students enrolled at the Uni-
versity," Krislov said.
Yet Levey said the University's
policies should be overturned because
they target enrolling a meaningful
number of minorities, which he said
contradicts then-Supreme Court Jus-
tice Louis Powell's ruling in Regents
of the University of California v.
Bakke. The 1978 ruling banned racial
quotas but permitted the use of race
as a factor in a narrowly tailored
admissions program.
"Powell did not say achieving
racial diversity was a compelling
state interest, he. said achieving
intellectual diversity was," Levey
said. "Achieving racial diversity for
the sake of racial diversity is uncon-
stitutional."

IKA
Continued from Page 1
and chemical plants, and in ele-
ments of the nation's food supply
and distribution system. Ridge said
governors are being asked to deploy
National Guard troops or extra state
police to help.
At the State Department, Secretary
of State Colin Powell said 30 nations
had joined the administration's "coali-
tion of the willing," and that another 15
had quietly pledged support.
But at least two of the 30 nations,
Spain and the Netherlands, have
explicitly ruled out the use of troops to
invade Iraq. Another, Japan, was iden-
tified as only a post-conflict member
of the coalition.
State Department spokesman
Richard Boucher said some of the
countries "may put troops on the
ground" and others may take on roles
such as assisting in a defense against
the use of chemical and biological .
weapons. Intelligence reports indicate
that Saddam has given his field-level
commanders the power to use chemi-
cal weapons, without instruction from
the leadership, Pentagon officials said
yesterday.
With war looming in the Persian
Gulf, the diplomatic and political fall-
out circled the globe.
In London, the House of Com-
mons backed British Prime Minister
Tony Blair's strong endorsement of
Bush's policy, defeating an anti-war
resolution and then voting in favor
of using "all means necessary" to

disarm Saddam. Blair has suffered
in public opinion over his support
of Bush, a stance that led three min-
isters to resign from his government
this week in protest.
French President Jacques Chirac,
whose country led opposition to war
within the U.N. Security Council, said
Bush's action would undermine future
efforts at peaceful disarmament. "Iraq
does not represent today an immediate
threat that would justify an immediate
war," he said.
German Chancellor Gerhard
Schroeder concurred, and said U.N.
weapons inspectors should have more
time to try to disarm Iraq of weapons
of mass destruction.
Both European leaders were
sending their foreign ministers to a
Security Council meeting set for
today in New York.
But by Bush's word, laid down in a
stern speech Monday night, the time
for diplomacy - and weapons inspec-
tions - had clearly come and gone.
Arab League Secretary-General
Amr Moussa scrapped plans for a
last-minute peacemaking trip to
Iraq. And the U.N. peacekeepers
boarded a plane out of Iraq, their
mission at an end.
For his part, the Iraqi leader
appeared on television wearing a mili-
tary uniform for the first time since the
Persian Gulf War in 1991.
Iraq's al-Shabab television, owned
by one of Saddam's sons, said the deci-
sion to defy Bush's ultimatum was
made in a leadership meeting chaired
by the Iraqi leader.

the michigan daily

EFFICIENCIES
$580-$610
CLOSE to ur campus - Fall
734-944-2405
FALL '03 SIX bedrooms & study, 3 bath-
rooms, great football parking, $2500/month.
Contact hutch@provide.net or 769-2344.
FALL 2 BDRM. near campus, town, upstairs,
mostly fu., free prkg. 12 mo. lease $850/mo.
Call 734-663-1639.
FALL 2003 - THE VISCOUNT! Incredible
3 bdrm. tri-level penthouse unit avail. Easily
fits 5, furn., modern kitchen, dwshr., heat &
H20 incl., free prkg., A/C, directly across
from CCRB. $1899/mo. 665-8825.
FALL 2003
CAMPUS AREAAPARTMENTS
Efficiency thru Six Bedrooms
Furnished & Unfumished
Apartments & Homes
Great Locations & Amenities
Wilson White Company, Inc.
734.995.9200
www.wilsonwhitecompanycom
Equal Housing Opportunity
FALL 2003 ONE, two, & three bdrm. unfurn.
apts., in turn of the century homes avail. Lo-
cated at Fifth Ave. & Williams. Off street
pikg. included. Call 761-8990 for details.
FALL 2003- HUGE 4 bdrm. bi-level pent-
house unit avail. near CCRB. Balc., 2 baths.,
modern kitchen w/ dwshr., A/C, furn., free
prkg., $1999/mo. 665-8825.
FALL, 2003- STUDIO furn. apartments. Call
Varsity Mgmt. for appt. 668-1100.
FOOD, FUN, FRIENDS, FACILITIES!
Student Co-op Housing. Rooms available
campus-wide for next Fall/Winter and Spring/-
Summer 2003. Includes utilities, laundry, park-
ing, meals, social activities! F/W approx.
$425/mo. Sp/Su $120-400/mo. Contact ICC
Office at 662-4414 or www.icc.umich.org
FURN. RM(S). IN Coed prof. frat hse. for
fall/ winter. Util(s). included, free prkg. $300-
400. E-mail: amagar@umich.edu
FURN. RM. W/ living space, avail. March 16
03, Ann Arbor Woods. Close to bus stop, 5
min. from campus, $480/mo. Days: 761-7833,
evenings: 971-4146.
GREAT 6 BDRM. home for Fall 2003- located
near Michigan Stadium (great for those fall
tailgate parties!) with new hardwood floors
and carpet. PRICE REDUCTION. A MUST
SEE! Lots of street parking. Wilson White
Co., Inc. at 734.995.9200 E.H.O.
GREAT HOUSES FOR spring & fall. All re-
modeled, 2 refrigerators, trash compactor, hard
wxd floors, lots of prkg. 973-7368.

LARGE FURNISHED 2 & 3 bdrm. apt. on S.
State, Near UM bus stop, 5 min. to Michigan
Union. Avail. Now, Winter & Fall '03 lease.
Heat & water incl., 2-sink bath., Intercom/sec.
buzzer, New furniture, New appliance, Bac.,
A/C, Prkg., Ldry. For 2-4. $1100-$1600, no
smoking/no pets. 734-996-3539 or
734-678-7250, ehtseng@comcastnet
LARGE STUDIO- CENTRAL campus at
Tower Plaza, furn. full kitch. I full bath.
plenty of closet space, 24 hr. security & well lit
Idry. facilities, $800/mo. + elec. avail. Sept. '01
2003. Call Ely 248-626-3800 ext. 116.
LOOKING FOR FEMALE grad. student to
lease, in August, 1 bdrm. in a townhouse.
Brand new. 2000'sq. ft. $550 + util(s). Furn. 5
min. from central campus and hosp. 677-4383.
MAY 2003-MAY 2004 lease 907 Greenwood
$550/mo. + util. Sharing w/5 other girls, but
you have you own bdrm. 810-664-8654
kborck@umich.edu
MAY LEASES AVAILABLE! Large con-
temporary 1&2 bedroom apts. 741-9300.
MCKINLEY ST. SPACIOUS 1&2 bdrm.
apts. Bay windows, fireplace, bale., A/C, cov-
ered prkg. A private shuttle to North Campus.
Fall leases avail. 741-9300
www.annaborapartments.net
MEDICAL STUDENTS. AVAILABLE FALL.
Large efficiencies, one and two bedroom
apartments located near the Medical Campus.
Lots of Amenities. Call Michigan Realty,
662-5500 or www.michcornealty.com. EHO.
MODERN 2 BDRM. apt. @ 1015 E. Ann. 2
blocks from hospital. $1165-1220/mo., 12
month lease, begins Aug. 29th. Prkg., ldry.,
no pets. 663-6138.
NEAR KERRYTOWN! GREAT LOCATION!
Spacious studio & 1 bdrm. apts. Fall leases
avail. 741-9300 www.annarborapartments.net
NEAR U OF M STADIUM
Avail. Aug. 1st. 4 bdrm., 2 bath home with
common kitch. and living room. Off -street
prkg. and on-site laundry. $2200/mo. + util.
Non-smoking. 734-930-8686.
NEAR UNION LARGE contemporary stu-
dios, 1,2 bdrm. apts. Fall leases avail.
741-9300 www.annarborapartments.net
NOW LEASING FOR Fall at Spring Prices
1 & 2 bedrooms starting at $659
734-761-1897.
OLD WEST SIDE- Great 1 & 2 furnished
bdrm. apts. for the economy-minded student.
Bus stops outside your door. Call 668-1100.
OLDY BUT GOODY -Great 2 bdrm. Apt
w/lots of nooks & cmnnies. Call Varsity
Mgmt.for appt. 668-1100.
PETS WELCOME- CONTEMPORARY
1&2 bdrm. apts. Great campus locations. Call
for details 741-9300.
RESIDENT MANAGER monthly rent credit
for your May and Fall lease. Call 741-9657.
RIVER'S EDGE APARTMENTS !!!! Why
pay the high A2 prices? Ypsilanti is only 15
min. drive to campus. Leasing now and fall. 1,
2, and 3 bdrms. From $595. Free Heat and
Water. 487-5750. Virtual tours and apply on-
line at www.riversedge.org
ROOMS ABOUT CAMPUS. Short term
leases, shared common areas, all remodeled.
Prkg. avail. From $450/mo. 973-7368.
SPACIOUS 6 BDRM. FOR FALL. Located
near Yost Ice Arena. Living room, kitchen and
1/2 bath on first floor. 6 bdrms. and 2 bath-
rooms on second floor. PRICE REDUC-
TION. ACT NOW! Wilson White Co., Inc. at
734.995.9200 E.H.O

!!FREE!!! SPRING/SUMMER SUBLET
apt. finder. 21 distinctive locations to choose
from. Studio to 3 bdmrs. 741-9300.
1 OR 2 BDRM. avail. in 2 bdrm. apt. Spring/-
Summer Sublet fully furn. Price neg. Call Elise
@ 327-7646 or Divya @ 248-763-4449.
2 BDRM. APT. May-Aug. 1-3 people. 7 min.
to diag, A/C, prkg., dwshr., spacious! Price
neg. archmanor@umich.edu 734-347-1657.
2 BDRM., 1 bath., (furn. or unfum.) @ 5th &
Packard. Avail. 5/14-end of Aug. Huge
kitch., Idry. in basement, prkg. for 2, $800/mo.
OBO. 846-1673.
2 BEDROOM SUBLEASE on S. University.
Free parking & ethernet. Furn., great loc.,
laundry on premises. Price neg. Avail. May to
Aug. Call Adam @ 327-4073.
AVAIL. IMMED. FOR SUBLET $475/mo. plus
util. 1211 Prospect. Contact 810-664-8654 or
kborck@umich.edu
AVAIL. MAY-AUG. RMS. in 6 bdrm. hse.
$400/mo. utils. incl., 5 min. from Diag. Call
Joe,jglionna@umich.edu or 416-801-7667
AVAIL. NOW WILLIAM & Division Sub-
lease. Eff. Sec. Buzzer, Laundry & Storage.
Gallatin Realty Co. 994-1202 ext. 16.
BEAUTIFUL 6 BDRM., new interior, A/C,
porch, ldry., wood fir(s)., rec. room, furn.,
spring/summer, negotiable. 717-7609.
MAY- AUG. SUBLET free prkg./ldry. great
loc., rent neg., 1-2 bdrm., 369-2843.
MAY-AUG. SUBLET 1 bdrm. 713 E. Kings-
ley, share w/ quiet female, unfurn., free prkg.,
$275/mo. neg. kgillis@umich.edu
SPRING/SUMMER SUBLET - 4 bdrm.
house, furm., free ldry., lots of prkg., near cam-
pus, $2000/mo. neg. call 332-1859.
SPRING/SUMMER SUBLET, $400/MO.
neg. Great location, flee prkg., wshrldryer.
Call 734-834-7256.
SUBLET AT INTERNATIONAL residence,
central campus, . to ., 1 or 3 bdrm. apt., May -
Aug. Call Esperanza 662-5529.

!!BARTENDERS WANTED, $300/DAY
potential, no experience necessary, training
provided. 800-965-6520 ext.125
$1500 WEEKLY POTENTIAL mailing our
circulars. Free information Call 203-683-0257.
**RESIDENT MANAGERS NEEDED.
Part time employment. Call Varsity Mgmt. at
668-1100.
BARTENDER POSITIONS! MAKE up to
$300/shift no exp. req., flexible hours, great
pay! call 800-806-0085 ext 1445.
BARTENDER TRAINEES NEEDED
$250 per day potential, local positions
Call 1-800-293-3985 ext. 504.
BARTENDERS, SERVERS, & beverage cart
servers needed. Also looking for golf course
maintenance workers. Positions avail, for
spring-fall. Apply in person at Stonebridge
Golf Club in A2, or call 734-429-8383 ext. 13.
CO-REC SLOW PITCH softball team seeks
women for season running May-July.
Email dsa@umich.edu
EARN $3500 OR MORE. Finally, SAT scores
and GPA matters! Donor Solutions
(206) 778-3022, info@donorsolutionsilc.com
or come visit our website at
www.donorsolutionsllc.com
HAVE THE SUMMER of Your Life & Get
Paid For It!! Camp Counselors needed for
Tennis, Arts, Athletics, and more! Apply on-
line at www.pinefoeswcamp.com
IMMED. OPENING P/T janitorial 3rd shift in
A2 area. 248-332-4242.
INSTRUCTIONAL ASSISTANT NEEDED
in one of our mulit-age, k-2nd. grade class-
rooms, full-time position. Must be CPI certi-
fied, with prior experience working with Gen-
eral Ed. and Special Ed. students. Salary
$12/hr. Call Honey Creek Community School
at 994-2636 or visit hc.wash.kl 2.mi.us
JUNGLE MARKETING GROUP. HOME
BASED OPPORTUNITY To make e-
commerce work for you! Call 877-851-0128
or email malong@tbigj.com
LIKE TO SMILE? Energetic individuals
needed for busy but fun apt. leasing office. P/T
to start, F/T in summer, Saturdays req., thru
Labor Day. Send resume or apply to 1099
Maiden lane Ann Arbor 48105. 665-4331.
fax: 665-2354,.islanddrive@mindspring.com
MAKE MONEY WHILE in college, serious
inquiries only. Call (734) 913-0686.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING INTERN
needed P/T or F/T at suspension spring sup-
plier in Wixom. Immediate opening. 2 $15/hr.
E-mail: linguasci@aol.com
MICHIGAN TELEFUND NOW hiring stu-
dents for flexible night and weekend sched-
ules. Fun work atmosphere and great job ex-
perience. Start at $7.25/hr. plus nightly
bonuses. Apply online or stop by 611 Church,
Suite 4F. www.telefund.umich.edu. 998-7420.

PART OR FULL TIME person needed for
construction, general maintenance, and paint-
ing. Unlimited hrs. avail, for the right person.
Kerrytown area, start immed. @ $10/hr. Good
exp. for architecture students. Call 996-0119.
SALES LEADERS
INT'L Co. Expanding in the Greater Metro area.
Seeking exp. leader in Sales and/or Marketing,
PIT & F/T avail. $50k + (Commission) 1st yr.
Call 248-746-3399 for local interview.
SCOREKEEPERS IS NOW hiring Cooks,
Floormen and waitstaff for immediate open-
ings. Bring your class schedule and apply to-
day at 310 Maynard A2 - Across from Borders
Books Downtown. 995-0100.
ST. THOMAS GRADE School seeks
Preschool director/teacher, practicing Catholic
w/early childhood background. Fax resume
by March 28 to 734-769-9078.
SUBSTITUTE TEACHER LONG-TERM
needed to fill a full school day, multi-age. 3rd.
-5th grade classroom position. Must be a certi-
fied teacher. Call Honey Creek Community
School at 994-2636 or visit hc.wash.k12.mi.us
TEACH ENGLISH OVERSEAS: Jobs $$
guaranteed/great pay. TESOL certified in 5
days in-class (Windsor, May 7-11) on-line or
by correspondence. FREE Infopack:
1-888-270-2941 or www.globaltesol.com
TEEN PROGRAM COORDINATOR (FIT).
Experienced; for the Ann Arbor YMCA.
Must have excellent communication skills,
good driving record, knowledge of service
learning & community programs, & strong
grant writing skills. Send resume: Sam
Humphrey, 350 S. 5th Ave., Ann Arbor, MI
48104. Resumes until March 30th. EOE'
TUTOR NEEDED 8TH grade core subjects
homework, 3 sessions/wk. $75 must have
transportation. 734-995-9732.

MOVIE EXTRAS/ MODELS NEEDED!!
No experience necessary. Earn up to $150-
$450 per day! Call 1-888-820-0164 ext 1079.

2 CHILDREN ALMOST 4 & 2, looking for
caring, fun-loving babysitter. Needed immed.
for Tues. mornings, then beginning in May for
Tues. AND Thurs. mornings. Own transporta-
tion & ref(s). req. Please call 623-9545.
BABYSITTER NEEDED - some regular &
evening hrs. and occas. Sat. AM. NE AA, 1
child, must have own transportation, bilingual
English/Spanish A+. 3 refs wanted. 995-3027.
LIVE-IN NANNY NEEDED. Free apt. in ex-
change for 16-20 hrs./wk. child care. Start
Spring or Fall 2003. Call Katie at 213-0889.
MOTHER'S HELPER NEEDED Mon.-Fri.,
3-6 PM. I child 21t2years old. 327-9781.
P/T BABYSITTER NEEEDED for 10. mo.
old. Around 10 hrs./wk. exp. and refs. re-
quired. Call Debbie @ 975-2512.

SMEMP-
k j

NECK PAIN OR BACK PAIN? Health care in-
tro. 4 Chiropractic treatments $75. Near U of
M. 734-994-5966.
Earn $1.000 - $2,000 for
your Student Group in just
3 hours!
Multiple fundraising options available. No carwashes.
No raffles. Just success! Fundraising dates are filling
quickly. Get with the programs that work!
o TaC pus
Your Trusted Soure efor College Fundraiing.

INTERESTED IN A LOAN? We can help con-
solidate all your bills. Good or bad credit ac-
cepted. Call @ 1-866-210-6801.
LAW SCHOOL ADMISSION TEST
Get private coaching with TESTGURU.
Ace the freakin' LSAT.
Smile.
734.996.2861 www.TESTGURU.com
PROFESSIONAL DRY CLEANERS! Shirts
and drop off service. Summer storage avail.
Comer of N. University & Thayer.
715 N. University or Call 662-1906.

AAPS COMMUNITY ED. & Rec is looking
for Swim Instructors for Spring Session (Apr.
28 - June 14) & Summer Session (mid-June -
mid-Aug.). Weekday and Sat. shifts avail.
Desired Qualifications: W.S.I. & LGT. For
more info please call 994-2300 ext. 232. EOE.
EARLY CHILDHOOD SUBSTITUTES
needed, no exp., will train. Fun job working
w/ young children, Call St. Paul Early Child-
hood Center 668-0887.
FUN SUMMER JOB! Starting Apr. Early
Childhood Center needs your help closing
Mon.-Fri. 3:30-5:30. Call St. Paul Early
Childhood Center 668-0887.
PAINTING, brick paver exp., private home
close to UM, $8-10/hr. flex. sched. 971-3321.
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT, FULL TIME,
work outside, opportunity for advancement.
make $3000-5000. P/T avail. now. 1-888-
277-9787. www.collegepro.com
SUMMER HELP WANTED on crop farm.
May - August. Ann Arbor area. 734-663-8981
SWIMMING POOLSERVICE and
construction. Fast paced outdoor work,
Weekends off. Top pay for hard working, self
motivated people to work in the NW

COLLEGE IS NO TIME TO SUFFER
WITH ACNE! It's time to look good, feel
great, have fun. Our dermatologist recom-
mended acne treatments heal acne fast and are
tint adjustable to perfectly hide blemishes. For
free information email clearskin@aweber.com
or call 1-800-818-2669.
GREAT SPORTSWEAR!! GREAT PRICES!!
Jackets, Warmups & Bags. Try it - you'll save
$$$ everytime. www.Kammanlnt.com

SPECIAL GIFT- WE'RE looking for healthy
women between the ages 21-25 for egg dona-
tion. All ethnic backgrounds are encouraged.
Fee paid. Send inquiries to AARMA, P.O.
Box 2708, Ann Arbor, MI48106.

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