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March 13, 2003 - Image 18

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The Michigan Daily, 2003-03-13

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6B - The Michigan Daily - lWekeod Ilgin - Thursday, March 13, 2003

The Michigan Daily - Weekenid liagie - Thursc

,y1mer's Mediterranean $eli

r--,
By Ellen McGarrity
Daily Arts Writer
ituated among
the facades of
Ann Arbor's,
downtown streets,
between the clothing
boutiques, the the-
aters and the bar-
gain book stores, are
some of the most
delightful and
unique cafes this
town has to offer.
They are not your
run-of-the-mill cof-
fee shops or your
regular fast food
chains.
With their distinc-
tive atmospheres
and ethnic food, they
stand out in the sea
of Starbuck's and
Wendy's. If your
mouth isn't watering
after hearing the
descriptions of these
cafes best and most
tasty treats, visit one
in the near future
and experience some-
thing truly unique to
Ann Arbor.

With locations in the Michigan Union, and on
Church, Main and State streets, this cafe
provides ample opportunity for students to
drop by. Boasting an impressive 82 different sandwiches
and numerous gourmet cakes, Amer's has been around
Ann Arbor since the early 1990s.
"The concept is sort of a New York-style deli with a
coffee shop and the flavor of Mediterranean cuisine,"
general manager Sean
Carter said.
And to go along with
their large amount of
seating, Carter pointedf
out its large amount of
food. The cafe has coffee,
smoothies, desserts, K
sandwiches, salads,
bagels and even ice
cream.
"There really isn't any-
where else in town where
you could eat almost=
every part of your meal in
one place," Carter said.
With sandwiches being
the main and most abun-
dant attraction, favorites
have obviously emerged An Amer's employee brews up
among staff and cus-
tomers. Carter sites the Georgia Reuben - smoked
turkey, Swiss cheese, coleslaw and Russian dressing on
grilled rye - and the chicken ranch - baked chicken
breast, Vermont cheddar cheese, cucumber and ranch
dressing also on grilled rye - as the most sought after.
"Their sandwiches are amazing!" LSA junior Megan
Wilbur said. "And their spacious setting is perfect for
long study sessions."
Also special to Amer's is its selection for vegetarian

customers.
"The falafel sandwiches as a group are very popular,"
Carter said. "Falafel is a mixture of garbanzo beans,
onions, garlic, parsley and spices. We grind it all up and
deep fry it. It's a vegan product - very Mediterranean."
And who could finish any meal without dessert? Some
of the most magnificent and beautiful cakes and tortes
line the shelves of one of the caf6's display cases.
"The intense chocolate
mousse torte is our
biggest seller," Carter
said. "It's flourless choco-
late cake, chocolate and
white chocolate mouse,
covered in ganache, a
tempered chocolate."
T Unlike many other
cafes, Amer's is a smoke-
free restaurant. It decided
to ban smoking just a few
years ago, and lost some
business because of it.
"It wasn't necessarily a
health-conscious deci-
sion, it's more of an
ambiance thing," said
NICK AZZARO/Daily Carter, explaining the
ome fun. cafe's controversial poli-
cy. "They say that most of
taste is smell and anytime you have smoke, you're not
going to taste your food."
Even if you don't care about the great food or atmos-
phere, come to Amer's for the personal touch the staff
tries to offer each customer that walks through the door.
"We get customers that appreciate the fact that we
know them by name," Carter said. "Obviously we don't
always remember, but when we take your order, we
always ask for your name."

Rendez-vous Cafe serves Ann Arbor the delicacies of I
Iendez-1o US

pRs

Cafe Felix

eeking a caf6 with some exot-
ic flair? Then this two-story
restaurant on South
University is your place.
Serving American food with a
Middle Eastern twist, as well as a
selection of coffee drinks, Caf&
Rendez-vous has been a favorite
among Michigan students for ten
years now.
Manager Abou Lakredine feels
that the best part about the caf6 is its
convenience for students. Open a
whopping twenty-two hours a day,
from 6 a.m. to 4 a.m., it provides an
alternative place to study for late
night crammers.
"The libraries close and (the stu-
dents) can eat, they can drink, they
can talk, they can smoke. They can
do whatever they want to," Lakredine
said. "It's a very good place to study
- very quiet."
A specialty of Rendez-vous is its
fresh fruit- smoothies. Lakredine rec-
ommends the Mango-Tango, which
consists of mango, peach, banana
and fat-free yogurt all mixed togeth-
er. Or, start off a first date with their
fancy caffeinated drink, Passionate
Kisses, which combines chocolate,
milk, strawberries and whipped
cream.
And if you're in the mood for
something more filling, this caf6
also serves crepes, sandwiches and
salads.
"I like the nutella crepes best
because they give you such a liberal
amount of nutella that you can even
pick it off the plate after you're done

with the
part!," L
Teo ah
good not
socializir
"I love
people vw
bunch of
said.
The ca
day also
shawarm;
with mar
lemon-ga
a side of
If you
Lakredin
11 a.m.,
you get
lege stu
food?).
Uniqu<
restauran
top for
exclusive
"We a
know of
upstairs,"
son we k
because (
it, but be
away froi
High c
tractions,
popular
classes.
"The fI
given in
senior E
"And the
nice stud

In contrast to its loud and spicy neighbor, Mongolian
BBQ, this European cafe provides a cozy, elegant
atmosphere for its customers. Owned by three
French brothers - the oldest is Felix - the cafe has graced
Main Street for five years now.
The most noticeable aspect of the cafe is its beautiful
wall paintings, mirroring the tables and bar in the restau-
rant itself, but manager Anna Zogas hopes that people will
visit for more than just the attractive interior.
"The variety is really what sets us apart (from other
restaurants)," Zogas said. "You can come here and order
pretty much whatever you like. You can come here with a
group of people and someone wants a coffee, someone
wants a glass of wine, someone wants a bagel or pastry -
and we can offer that."
The menu takes its inspiration from French and Spanish
influences, serving croissants, pastries and omelettes dur-
ing the day, while at night switching to their tapas menu.
"Tapas are small Spanish dishes meant to be paired with
each other and shared amongst a group of people," said
Zogas, explaining the restaurant's specialty. "It's a
European concept in that people will go sit and drink wine
and beer with small bites to eat."
At five in the evening, the lights dim and this Spanish
tradition comes alive. Cafe Felix serves all sorts of tapas,
from salads to vegetables to fish and meat. Zogas suggests
the Hojaldre De Champinion, a puff pastry filled with
portabello mushrooms and topped with a red wine cream
sauce or their popular Brie Plate, warm brie cheese served
with strawberries and baguette slices.
And if you're tired of watching your roommates chug
beer on a Saturday night, the cafe has a more refined way
to enjoy alcohol with their coffee cordials. Combining fine
liquors and Italian imported Segafrado espresso, these cof-
fee drinks are a delicious way to end the night. Its most

Enjoy a treat alongside the artwork at Cafe Felix .
famous is the Cafe l'Orange, containing Remy Martin,
Cointreau, Grand Marnier, coffee and whipped cream.
Also for those with a sweet tooth, there are sweet and
savory crepes served throughout the day. The crepes
come with a variety of fillings including fresh berries,
ice cream and Nutella as well as meats and vegetables (in
the savory crepes).
Zogas feels that the cafe does not cater to one specific
age group.
"We have many regulars - we have people who will
come in for dinner a certain night of every week, profes-
sors who come in from the university and sit and do their
work in the back," Zogas said. "I would encourage stu-
dents to come in and sit and enjoy the atmosphere."
LSA sophomore Kate Wheeler has already had the
chance to sample some of Cafe Felix's special dishes.
"The crepes are beautifully prepared and delicious,"
Wheeler said. "The atmosphere makes you feel as if
you're in France."

i----r-------

1: Cafe Felix
204 S. Main St.
2-4: Amer's
Mediterranean Deli
321 S. State St.
530 S. State St.
611 Church St.
5: Rendez-vous Cafe
1110 S. University Ave.

0

ASHLEY
HARPER/Daily
A smoothie
from Rendez-
vous Cafe Is
one of mnya
features
drinks.

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