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10A - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, March 6, 2003

NITTANY LIONS
Continued from Page SA
picked up the slack. Freshman Daniel Horton and
junior Bernard Robinson, who had two and six points
in the first and second halves respectively, exploded on
the offensive end to lead the Wolverines.
"This is a great team," Blanchard said. "When I
went out, everybody hit big shots, Sherrod made a big
shot, Bernard was making great moves and dishes."
Robinson's game was working inside and outside, as
he displayed his touch from long range, as well as his
quickness and agility in going to the basket. His domi-
nance was never more evident than in the second half
when he called for the ball on the baseline and drove
right past Penn State's Jan Jagla to throw it down for a
70-59 Michigan lead. He finished 1-of-2 from behind

the arc.
"(Robinson) would be a tough matchup for anyone,'
Penn State coach Jerry Dunn said.
Robinson finished with a game-high 17, while Hor-
ton finished with 12 on 5-of-10 shooting. Freshmen
Lester Abram (14 points) and Chris Hunter (12) were
the other two Michigan players in double figures.
Abram was tenacious as usual on the floor. He
reached double figures for the fifth straight game and
seventh in his last eight. Hunter was perfect from the
floor at 6-of-6, as he finished tough plays around the
glass that he wasn't finishing earlier this season. He
even dunked a few times, which was a welcome sight
for his fellow teammates.
It was a special night for Horton individually as well.
With two 3-pointers, Horton passed former Wolverine
Louis Bullock for most 3-pointers made by a Michigan

freshman in a season.
But the word of the day was "teamwork," as Amaker
was marveled by his team's unselfish, disciplined play.
"I thought we played an outstanding team game in
the second half," Amaker said. "We were unselfish, we
took care of the basketball, we made good decisions
and we spread the ball around really well.
"It was fun to watch."
Abram was also thrilled with the smooth Michigan
offense, but said that the Wolverines will have to
improve its rebounding if they want to finish out the
season with a win over Purdue at home this Saturday.
P3enn State managed to grab 13 offensive rebounds in
the game.
"Defensively, we gave up way too many offensive
rebounds;' Abram said. "We have to tighten up with
that."

41

Horton passes Bullock's mark'

By Naweed Sikora
Daily Sports Writer

STATE COLLEGE - Former
Michigan star Louis Bullock (1995-
99) may have been erased from the

Michigan record
books for his
involvement with
Ed Martin, but
freshman Daniel
Horton still found a
way to pass him up.

o
o° '' .

DANNY MOLOSHOK/Dally
Michelle DaCosta smacks a forehand. DaCosta and the Wolverines have been
counting on Leanne Rutherford's ability to take the final singles match.
Netterridng S wave of
Ruthierford's streak

By Eric Ambinder
Daily Sports Writer
Michigan women's tennis player
Leanne Rutherford and Los Angeles
Lakers basketball player Kobe Bryant
have something in common - but you
probably didn't know that.
There's been so much attention on
Bryant's recent scoring streak of 40-
plus points in consecutive games
that lost in the craziness has been
the brilliant play of Rutherford. She
had a 10-match win streak of her
own at No. 4 singles going into last
weekend's contest
against No. 1 ranked -
Duke. And just like To]
Bryant's, Rutherford's
streak ended, but wasa
nonetheless impressive.
During her streak, Tut
Rutherford had been the ___rsiy Te
difference-maker for
Michigan, pulling out
tight victories in crunch-time against
DePaul (7-5, 7-6), then No. 11 Ken-
tucky (6-3, 1-6, 6-3) and Penn State
(7-6, 7-5) - all 4-3 team victories for
the Wolverines (1-1 Big Ten, 5-3
Overall).
Despite all of these close matches
during her winning streak, Rutherford
stayed calm due to her on-court confi-
dence.
"I wouldn't say that I've had more
pressure on myself just because of a
winning streak," Rutherford said. "It
gives you a little bit extra incentive to
win those matches"
But pressure only seems to motivate
Rutherford on the court. In her past 11
matches, five have labored into the
third set, but she has won each of
them.
Rutherford credits much of her late
game heroics to the amount of time
she spends on the court.
"I know I'm not going to get tired,"
she said. "I've played so many third
sets that I've kind of gotten used to
them."

Her long matches have caught the
attention of her teammates.
"They always give me a hard time
because I'm always playing a third
set," she said jokingly. "It seems like
I'm always the last one playing on the
court."
The ease of taking matches the dis-
tance stems from her high school days.
Rutherford attended the National
Sport School in Calgary, where all of
the students are athletes and days are
split evenly between sports and aca-
demics.
"We were always traveling," said
Rutherford about her high
---- school experience. "I
always had to send e-mails
(to school) and bring my
laptop on the road."
This unique high school
has prepared her for the
is Center rigorous traveling schedule
of collegiate tennis and has
helped her play consistent
tennis away from home this season.
During Michigan's recent six-match
road trip, Rutherford won five of her
six singles matches.
And even though the road has been
so comfortable for Rutherford, return-
ing home might not be such a bad
thing for her team. Michigan has an
eight-game home winning streak at
the Varsity Tennis Center, matching its
all-time mark set back in the facility's
inaugural 1996-97 season.
So after 39 days away from home,
the Wolverines will host the Ball State
Cardinals (1-1 MAC, 6-4) on Thurs-
day at 4 p.m.
Michigan has never played the
unranked Cardinals and isn't ready to
check them off as an easy victory.
"We came into this year with quite a
bit of confidence," Rutherford said.
We're an older team now, and we
know what we're capable of. Just
because their not top-ranked doesn't
mean they're not good."
I'm pretty sure that Kobe Bryant
guy has a similar philosophy.

With two 3-pointers in last night's
game, Horton broke Bullock's record
for most 3-pointers made in a season
by a freshman. He now has 71, one
better than Bullock's 70 set in 1995-96.
"It's a significant achievement for
Daniel," Tommy Amaker said. "But I
think it also says a lot about our team.
His teammates had a lot of confidence
in him to find him for those shots."
Horton, who struggled during the first
few games of the season, first showed
signs of his ability to drop bombs from
the outside when he hit four against
Bowling Green and finished with 26
points in Michigan's first win.
Later in the season - while playing
on CBS and in Los Angeles against
UCLA - the freshman sank 7-of-10
from behind the arc and really made the
nation aware of what he was capable of.
Since then, Horton's 3-point shooting
ability has been a significant, necessary
threat for Michigan this season. And it's
not just his ability to make the shot that
matters. The freshman, as Amaker has
said over and over this season, is always
ready to take the big shots, and that's

exactly the role the Wolverines want
him to play.
"It means a lot to me to pass some-
body like Louis Bullock," Horton said.
"He was a great shooter and a great
player at this school, and hopefully I
can continue to do what he did while
playing here."
10 WINs: Michigan reached the 10-
win plateau in conference play for the
first time since the 1997-98 season,
when it finished 11-5. If the Wolverines
can win on Saturday, they can tie this
mark. Even though 10 is not enough for
the conference title, Amaker says it still
holds special meaning.
"When you get 10 wins, I think it is a
significant achievement," Amaker said.
"We're very proud of that, and we've got
a game to go. We feel that not many
teams are able to reach that mark. You
look around the country, and even in our
league, to have 10 conference wins is a
measuring stick for some success in
your league."
This is also the first time since 1997-
98 that Michigan finished with four
conference road wins.
LIGmTs ouT: The Michigan offense is
heating up, and was hotter last night
than it has been all season long. The
Wolverines shot 60 percent from the
field and 52.9 percent from the behind
the arc - both season highs. Five play-
ers also reached double figures for the
first time since last season against Ver-
mont on Jan. 26, 2002.
"We were able to find each other in
transition and at the right times, and
things were falling for us," junior
Bernard Robinson said. "We're defi-

nitely at our best when everyone is get-
ting into the act and doing little things
out on the court. It's very hard for any
team to beat us."
INJURIES: LaVell Blanchard tweaked
his ankle at the end of the first half
last night. The senior, who had scored
13 points and was very hot from the
floor prior to the injury, could not
maintain the same level of movement
out on the court, and sat out most of
the second half.
"It's a little sore, but you have to be
ready," Blanchard said.

AP PHOTO
Michigan's Daniel Horton looks to dish
as he drives to the basket.

Rival Hoosiers come to Canham

By Ellen McGarrty
Daily Sports Writer

Even though the Michigan women's water polo team has a
10-0-1 record against Indiana, coach Matt Anderson still
views the Hoosiers as an arch rival.
"It is the best rivalry outside of California," Anderson said.
The Wolverines will step up to the plate against Indiana
for the second time this season Saturday. In their first meet-
ing in January, 400 fans crammed into Canham Natatorium,
and if the same-sized crowd shows up this
weekend, the team doesn't plan to let them-
down.
Anderson, who last year was assistant coach T
at Indiana, knows what playing at opposite Souhm
ends of the pool in this rivalry feels like.
"Especially seeing it last year as an assistant ;.
(at Indiana), it was pretty insane," Anderson at 9:E1
said. "This year as the head coach, it's pretty srtig t
insane, too. Besides being opposite ends of the C
color spectrum, blue and red, you've got oppo- .
site ends of the Midwest. If someone is going
to play water polo in the Midwest, they have two choices:
Michigan and Indiana."
Anderson looks to the team's seniors to carry it to victory
this weekend, because they were outswimming Indiana even
before the Wolverines graduated to varsity status.
"My freshman year, we beat them the first two games of
the season;' senior Emily Pelino said. "We went two and two
with them. One of the things that makes it such a rivalry is
that it never mattered that we were club (and Indiana was
varsity). It was always a huge game for us and for them"

But, this weekend's game will prove to be more challeng-
ing for the Wolverines than their dominating 12-6 win
against the Hoosiers in January. After the loss of high-scor-
ing freshman Megan Hausmann due to a broken finger, the
team lost another starter during its spring break West Coast
trip, sophomore Jo Antonsen, to the same injury. In fact,
Antonsen broke the same finger in the same quarter to the
same team, California-Santa Barbara, as Hausmann did just
two weeks before.
Also during the trip to California last week, red-shirted
junior Abbi Rowe, who plays almost as much as a
starter, suffered a concussion after a blow to the
END jaw. She'll likely stay out of the water for the next
couple weeks.
"Maybe the third time is the charm- mean-
en ing no more injuries;' Anderson said. "We're
not a team that can afford to keep losing our top
d players."
Anderson will be looking to the rest of the team
_,u to step up in the coming weeks' games.
. . "You always are going to have players who
aren't playing as much, who wish they were or
think they should be, and now is the opportunity for them,"
Anderson said. "It's up to them to prove that they deserve to
play in the regular rotation."
Despite Michigan's lacking of a few players, senior
Stephanie Morse is confident the Wolverines will triumph
over the Hoosiers.
"We prep for Indiana a week before we play," Morse said.
"For Indiana, it's like, 'We're gonna beat this girl and this
girl' - we know everyone on the team. We know who's
going to do what and how we expect each girl to play."

SMITH
Continued from Page BA
credibility - as a former player and
constant winner. When Amaker invited
the guys over to his house for cookouts,
it was hard for the Wolverines to miss
the coach's showcases of championship
rings, trophies and awards.
He told them they weren't just playing
for themselves - they were playing for
each other, they were playing for the
program. He tried to create a "family
atmosphere" of togetherness - know-
ing it would help bring cohesiveness and
accountability.
And to the players, he started to make
some sense.
"It's hard not to believe in a guy who's
been there before and knows what it
takes," senior Gavin Groninger said.
They needed to 'believe'
Amaker's first year may not have been
considered successful on the court. His
11-18 mark was just one game better
than Ellerbe's the year before. But he
laid the groundwork, knowing it would
pay dividends eventually. He just didn't
know it would come so soon.
Five talented freshmen came in and
immediately bought into Amaker's plan.
Even after the 0-6 start, the sanctions
and the suffering, Amaker looked them
in the eyes and told them they were
"special."He told them to start over, at
0-0. He told them they were a champi-
onship-caliber team.
They not only believed, they proved it.
And Amaker deserves his due.
Joe Smith can be reached at
josephms@umich.edu.
OFFENSE"
Continued from Page 8A
everyone is sharing the ball. You cut,
move in space and wind up getting the
ball (for an easy bucket)."
Penn State's head coach, Jerry Dunn,
attributed the Michigan offensive suc-
cess to its ability to put the ball on the'
floor andattack the baseline~The
Wolverines were also able to exploit
the Nittany Lions' defensive rotatios,
and that created mismatches up high
and high-percentage shots down low.
Creating these advantages and
spreading the court on offense became
imperative for the Wolverines after
LaVell Blanchard went down in the
second half with a sore ankle. Blan-
chard, the team's senior leader, acted as
its catalyst for the second straight
game. He put up 16 points in the first
half as he hit four of his six 3-point
attempts.
"I really thought this game was
going to say more internally and tell us
as a staff so much about our team,"
Amaker said. "Given where we came
from and what was at stake last week-
end, for us to go on the road and
receive solid performances and do
some positive things."
Badgers
clinch Big
Ten title
MADISON (AP) - Devin Harris
had two free throws coming with
four-tenths of a second left. One
would give Wisconsin the Big Ten
title outright.
He missed the first.
"No doubt in my mind, the second
one was going in," said Harris, who
calmly swished that one to give the
24th-ranked Badgers a 60-59 victory

over No. 14 Illinois last night and its
first outright conference title since
1947.
After a timeout, Brian Cook of the
Illini caught Sean Harrington's long
inbounds pass but couldn't get off a
shot in time, then couldn't avoid the
wave of students rushing from the
stands to celebrate the Badgers' first
consecutive conference crowns since
1923-24.
Harris was fouled by Dee Brown as
he drove to the basket with under a
second left.
"I'm still kind of mad I didn't get
the shot off,' said Harris, who figured
the game was headed for overtime at
that moment. "I'm just glad they
called the foul. I wasn't expecting a
P-i -11 2 ane~e n

01

0

Dapoo-Prava...ra (R)

lContraceptive Injection
medroxyprogesterone acetate injectable suspension

3ir'tk con~trol you -t-ir~k aeout just +-c a year

it v

DEPO-PROVERA Contraceptive Injection
(medroxyprogesterone acetate injectable suspension, USP)
This product is intended to prevent pregnancy. It does not protect against HIV
infection (AIDS) and other sexually transmitted diseases.
What is DEPO-PROVERA Contraceptive Injection?
DEPO-PROVERA Contraceptive Injection is a form of birth control that is given as an
intramuscular injection (a shot) in the buttock or upper arm once every 3 months (13 weeks). To
continue your contraceptive protection, you must return for your next injection promptly atthe
end of 3 months (3 weeks). DEPO-PROVERA contains medroxyprogesterone acetate, a
chemical similar to (but not the same as) the natural hormone progesterone, which is produced
by your ovaries during the second half of your menstrual cycle. DEPO-PROVERA acts by
preventing your egg cells from ripening. If an egg is riot released from the ovaries duringyour
menstrual cycle, it cannot become fertiized by sperm and result in pregnancy. DEPO-PROVERA
also causes chanes in the lining of our uterus that make it less likely or pregnancy to occur
How effective is DEPO-PROVERA Contraceptive Injection?
The efficacy of DEPO-PROVERtA Contraceptive Injection depends on following the
recommended dosage schedule exactly (see "How often do I get my shot of DEPO-PROVERA
Contraceptive Injection?"). To make sure you are not pregnant when you first get
DEPO-PROVERA Contraceptive Injection, your first injection must be given ONLY during
the first 5 days of a normal menstrual period; ONLY within the first 5 days after childbirth if not
breast-feeding; and, if exclusively breast-feeding, ONLY at the sixth week after childbirth. It is a
Iong-term injectable contraceptive when administered at 3-month (I 3-week) intervals.
DEPO-PROVERA Contraceptive Injection is over 99% effective, making it one of the most reliable
methods of birth control available. This means that the average annual pregnancy rate is less than
one for every 100 women who use DEPO-PROVERA. The effectiveness of most contraceptive
methods depends in part on how reliably each woman uses the method. The effectiveness of
DEPO-PROVERA depends only on the patient returning every 3 months (13 weeks) for her next
injection. Your health-care provider will help you compare DEPO-PROVERA with other
contraceptive methods and give you the information you need in order to decide which
contraceptive method is the right choice for you.
The following table shows the percent of women who got pregnant while using different kinds of
contraceptive methods. It gives both the lowest expected rate of pregnancy (the rate expected
in women who use each method exactly as it should be used) and the typical rate of pregnancy
(which includes women who became pregnant because they forgot to use their birth control or
because they did not follow the directions exactly).
Percent of Women Experiencing an Accidental Pregnancy
in the First Year of Continuous Use

- if you have had cancer of the breast
" if you have had a stroke
" if you have or have had blood clots (phlebitis) in your legs
- if you have problems with your liver or liver disease
" if you are allergic to DEPO-PROVERA (medroxyprogesterone acetate or any of its other
ingredients).
What other things should I consider before using DEPO-PROVERA
Contraceptive Injection?
You will have a physical examination before your doctor prescribes DEPO-PROVERA, It is
important to tell your health-care provider if you have any of the following:
"a family history of breast cancer
- an abnormal mamnogran (breast x-ray), fibrocystic breast disease, breast nodules or lumps, or
bleeding from your nipples
- kidney disease
- irregular or scanty menstrual periods
- high blood pressure
Smigraine headaches
" asthma
"epilepsy (convulsions or seizures)
diabetes or a family history of diabetes
. a history of depression
- if you are taking any prescription or over-the-counter medications
This product is intended to prevent pregnancy. It does not protect against
transmission of HIV (AIDS) and other sexually transmitted diseases such as
chlamydia, genital herpes, genital warts, gonorrhea, hepatitis B, and syphilis.
What if I want to become pregnant after using DEPO-PROVERA Contraceptive
Injection?
Because DEPO-PROVERA is a long-acting birth control method, it takes some time after your last
injection for its effect to wear off. Based on the results from a large study done in the United States,
for women who stop using DEPO-PROVERA in order to become pregnant, it is expected that
about half of those who become pregnant will do so in about 10 months after their last injection;
about two thirds of those who become pregnant will do so in about 12 months; about 83% of
those who become pregnant will do so in about I5 months; and about 93% of those who become
pregnant will do so in about 18 months after their last injection. The length of time you use
DEPO-PROVERA has no effect on how Ion it takes ou to become pregnant after youstop using it
What are the risks of using DEPO- ROVE RA Contraceptive Injec ion?
IHIrregular Menstrual Bleeding
The side effect reported most frequently by women who use DEPO-PROVERA for
contraception is a change in their normal menstrual cycle. During the first year of using
DEPO-PROVERA, you might have one or more of the following changes: irregular or
unpredictable bleeding or spotting, an increase or decrease in menstrual bleeding, or no bleeding
at all, Unusually heavy or continuous bleeding, however; is not a usual effect of DEPO-PROVERA;
and if this happ ens, you should see your health-care provider right away. With continued use of
DEPO-PROVERA, bleeding usually decreases, and many women stop having periods completely
In clinical studies of DEPO-PROVERA, 55% of the women studied reported no menstrual
bleeding (amenorrhea) after I year of use, and 68% of the women studied reported no menstrual
bleeding after 2 years of use. The reason that your periods stop is because DEPO-PROVERA
causes a resting state in your ovaries. When your ovaries do not release an egg monthly, the
regular monthly growth of the lining of your uterus does not occur and, therefore, the bleeding
that comes with your normal menstruation does not take place. When you stop using
DEPO-PROVERA your menstrual period will usually in time, return to its normal cycle.
2.8one Mineral Changes
Use of DEPO-PROVERA may be associated with a decrease in the amount of mineral stored in
vorhoe.Thiscould iAirncrse Your rc i,,irsko eeoinQne nn.fractures. Ther ae ofhone mineral

6.Other Risks
Women who use hormone-based contraceptives may have an increased risk of blood clots or
stroke. Also, if a contraceptive method fails, there is a possibility that the fertilized egg will begin
to develop outside of the uterus (ectopic pregnancy). While these events are rare, you should
tell your health-care provider if you have any of the problems listed in the next section.
What symptoms may signal problems while using DEPO-PROVERA
Contraceptive Injection?
Call your health-care provider immediately if any of these problems occur following an injection
of D EPO-PROVERA:
" sharp chest pain, coughing up of blood, or sudden shortness of breath (indicating a possible clot
in the lung')
" sudden severe headache or vomiting, dizziness or fainting, problems with your eyesight or
speech, weakness, or numbness in an arm or leg (indicating a possible stroke)
" severe pain or swelling in the calf (indicating a possible clot in the leg)
- unusually heavy vaginal bleeding
* severe pain or tenderness in the lower abdominal area
pritent pamn, pus, or bleeding at the injection site
Wr hat are the possible side effects of DEPO-PROVERA Contraceptive Injection?
.Weight Gainr
You may experience a weightgain while you are using DEPO-PROVERA. About two thirds of
the women who used DEP-PROVERA in clinical trials reported a weight gain of about 5 pounds
during the first year of use. You may continue to gain weight after the first year Women in one
large study who used DEPO-PROVERA for 2 yearsgained an average total of 8.1 pounds over
those 2 years, or approximately 4 pounds per year Women who continued for 4 years gained an
average total of 13.8 pounds over those 4 years, or approximately 3.5 pounds per year. Women
who continued for 6 years gained an average total of 16.5 pounds over those 6 years, or
approximately 2.75 pounds per year
2. ther Side Effects
In a clinical study of over 3,900 women who used DEPO-PROVERA for up to 7 years, some
women reported the following effects that may or may not have been related to their use of
DEPO-PROVERA: Irregular menstrual bleeding, amenorrhea, headache, nervousness, abdominal
cramps, dizziness, weakness or fatigue, decreased sexual desire, le cramps, nausea, vaginal
discharge or irritation, breast swelling and tenderness, bloating, sweling of the hands or feet,
backache, depression, insomnia, acne, pelvic pain, no hair growth or excessive hair loss, rash, hot
flashes, and joint pain. Other problems were reported by very few of the women in the clinical
trials, but some of these could be serious. These include convulsions, jaundice, urinary tract
infections, allergic reactions, fainting, paralysis, osteoporosis, lack of retum to fertility deep vein
thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, breast cancer, or cervical cancer If these or any other problems
occur during your use of DEPO-PROVERA, discuss them with your health-care provider
Should any precautions be followed during use of DEPO-PROVERA
Contraceptive Injection?
I.Missed Periods
During the time you are using DEPO-PROVERA for contraception, you may skip a period, or your
periods may stop completely If you have been receiving your DEPO-PROVERA injections
regularly every 3 months (13 weeks), then you are probably not pregnant. However; if you think
that you may be pregnant, see your health-care provider
2.Lborotory Test Interactions
If you are scheduled for any laboratory tests, tell your health-care provider that you are using
DEPO-PROVERA for contraception. Certain blood tests are affected by hormones such as
DEPO-PROVERA.
.TDrug Intemoctons
Cadren (aminoglutethimide) is an. anticancer drug that may significantly decrease the
effectiveness of DEPO-PROVERA if the two drugs are given during the same tim.
4 nNursing Mothers
Althougph DEPO-PROVERA can he passed1 tn the nuirsing infant in the breast milk, no harmfuil

Lowest
Method Expected Typical
DEIO-PROVERA 0.3 0.3
Implants (Norplant) _ _0.2 0.2*-
Female sterilization 02 0.4
Male sterilization 0.1 0.15
Oricontraceptive (pill) 3
Combined 0.1
Progestogen only 0.5
IU- -3

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