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The Michigan Daily - Thursday, March 6, 2003 - 7A

BUDGET
Continued from Page 1A
said. "In Ann Arbor you have more
access to other sources of income.
The University could take more out
of state students or raise tuition to
partially cover the loss."
Critics of cutting higher educa-
tion before other programs are wary
of the danger of excessive cuts to
public universities.
Schwarz, the former chair of the
Senate Higher Education Appropri-
ations Subcommittee, asserted the
importance of universities as an
economic development instrument
and a symbol of pride.
"The universities are the beacon
of excellence that we have in our
state, and I'm one of the, people
who is old enough to know that that
is absolutely true," Schwarz said.
"Higher education has to share
the burden, but it is counterproduc-
tive to pile on cuts to the universi-
ties."
Granholm has been secretive
about the specifics of her proposed

cuts, but her spokeswoman said that
open dialogue with higher educa-
tion officials has been an important
part of the decision-making
process.
"It's been an open process and the
governor's staff has had several
meetings with the university presi-
dents," Boyd said. "None of the
details of the budget have been
shared, but it's been a process based
upon communication."
University President Mary Sue
Coleman will address the campus
community about the implication of
the cuts shortly after the governor's
announcement.
"She's been preparing and the
University has been preparing
before the current president was in
office," Coleman's chief of staff,
Chacona Johnson, said.
Granholm is also expected to pro-
pose cuts to the state universities'
Life Sciences Corridor, which
would limit funding for university
research projects, and to decrease
revenue sharing, resulting in cuts
for police and fire services.

BAKKE
Continued from Page 1A
Legal experts said Powell's opinion
also changed the way many Americans
looked at quota systems, which were
commonly used and accepted by selec-
tive and professional schools prior to
the Bakke decision.
Though the word "quota" today has
a negative connotation, it was not
always so stigmatized, they said.
"What made quota a bad word, so
to speak, was that Powell said you
couldn't use it," said Sedler, who was
one of many experts to write a brief
in favor of Davis's admissions poli-
cies during Bakke. "Supreme Court
decisions have an effect of influenc-
ing public opinion."
After Powell's decision in Bakke,
colleges and universities using quotas
were forced to change their systems,
and the connotations associated with
quotas grew.
"Everybody started trying to dis-

tance themselves from quotas, and
because everyone was trying to dis-
tance themselves from quotas, it start-
ed to seem like they are wrong," said
Miranda Massie, the attorney for the
student interveners in the University's
admissions cases. "The word quota is
one that people of all races, but espe-
cially whites, respond really strongly
against."
Massie added that though Bakke
had been considered a "conservative"
disappointment for civil rights lead-
ers at the time, civil rights activists
now have been persuaded now to
defend it.
"People definitely viewed Bakke
as a step back from the progress of
Brown v. Board of Education. You
can see that from the dissent of the
four Supreme Court justices," Massie
said. "It was nevertheless a decision
that preserved some part of the
promise of integration. It still
allowed universities to take race-con-
scious steps to desegregate."

0'Conn or, Kennedy

RALLY
Continued from Page 1A
RSC performer Patrick Romer said
he felt the use of art for the rally was
only one element of the larger anti-
war movement. "It doesn't feel to me
like it's the essential message, but it's
a part of the message," he said. "If it
makes more people start talking about
it then that's a good thing."
Romer and fellow performer Cia-
ran McIntyre read poems to the
crowd about the aftermath of the
Allied bombing of Dresden, Ger-
many in .1943 and a poem by W.B.
Yeats that dealt with the chaos and
anarchy of war.
LSA sophomore Ryan Ford said he
thought it was great that people could
express their opinions at the rally, but
questioned whether art is the most
effective means of portraying the
major issues.
"I don't know if it's helping their
cause. I think having Radical Cheer-

leaders (a group of students who per-
form anti-war chants) and crazy poet-
ry kind of isolates their group and
makes it a radical faction," he said.
"It's kind of hard to draw mainstream,
moderate people into this."
RC freshman and Anti-War Action!
member Ryan Bates, another Act Out
organizer, said he understood that the
art used at the rally did not directly
address the specific issues of the Iraq
situation. "I think part of that is a
shortcoming. Sometimes we're so
convinced we forget we have to do
convincing," Bates said.
RC junior and Acting Out member
Selcen Onsan had another take. "I
think if we related this to just Iraq, it
would be saying that war is OK in
some situations," she said. "No matter
what, war is not justified."
LSA freshman Libby Benton said
she learned a lot from the day's
activities. "It's about being educated
and knowing what you're opposing,"
she said.

PANEL
Continued from Page IA
is an ongoing, unofficial war against
Native Americans and other minorities,
she said.
"I'd like to suggest that the U.S. gov-
ernment has been engaged in a perma-
nent war with indigenous people within
the U.S.," Smith said. "We often don't
make the link between the war abroad
and the war that's been going on here for
500 years." Smith said this internal war
has brought suffering to Native Ameri-
can women.
Smith discussed colonial policies
that particularly advocated the mur-
der of women in order to stop the
growth of the native populations. She
added that the injustices continued
into the contemporary era, including
the secret sterilization of native
women during the 1970s.
LSA sophomore Elizabeth Campbell
said Smith's presentation was "intrigu-
ing."
"You never-really hear about the his-
tory (of native women) and how the
state was involved," Campbell said.

Center for Afro-American Studies
post-doctorate fellow Amal Fadialla said
the presentation's subject was very rele-
vant considering the current global cli-
mate. "There is definitely a link between
how power is represented and how
power is used to repress people inside,"
she said. "We always seem to think that
it's always about people outside of our
boundaries, and they are right here."
Luci and Suarez specifically dis-
cussed the rape as a gender crime in
international conflicts, citing specific
examples from wars in the Balkans and
Haiti.
Suarez said rape has historically been
used as a "political tool," but is often
overshadowed by other social ills. The
deeply personal experience of rape.and
the dishonor associated with it has made
many women afraid to discuss their trau-
mas, she said. As a result, the success of
many international organizations in aid-
ing victims is inherently limited, Suarez
added.
The Center for the Education of
Women, the Institute for Research on
Women and the Gender and Women's
Studies Program sponsored the event.

often cast c
COURT
Continued from Page 1A
"The particular issues in (a) case
can often explain more than a pre-
diction of liberalism and conser-
vatism," Rosenblum said.
In this term, several cases depict
the mixed views of the court and
O'Connor's tendency to be the
deciding vote.
Yesterday, the court announced its
split 5-4 decision in two cases to
uphold a California law allowing
state legislatures to prescribe long
sentences for repeat offenders, even
if their latest offense was a relative-
ly minor one.
In one of the cases, Ewing v. Cali-
fornia, O'Connor stated her reason-
ing, noting the plaintiff's repeated
felonies and the 67 percent rate of
recidivism in California.
"We do not sit as a 'superlegisla-
ture' to second-guess these policy
choices. It is enough that the State
of California has a reasonable basis
for believing that dramatically
enhanced sentences for habitual
felons advances the goals of its
criminal justice system in any sub-
stantial way," O'Connor wrote in
the majority opinion. "(Gary)
Ewing's sentence is justified by the
State's public-safety interest in
incapacitating and deterring recidi-
vist felons, and amply supported by
his own long, serious criminal
record."
Last week, the court decided in
Scheidler v. National Organization
for Women that NOW cannot sue
anti-abortion groups under the
Racketeer-Influenced and Corrupt
Organizations Act, a law normally
used to indict organized crime
members. NOW alleged that violent
acts and protests in the 1980s by

rcial votes
"The particular issues
in (a) case can often
explain more than a
prediction of liberalism
and conservatism."
- Victor Rosenblum
Northwestern University law professor
anti-abortion groups cutting off
abortion clinic access were similar
to extortion.
But by a decision of 8-1 with
Stevens dissenting, Rehnquist wrote
that the protestors were not extor-
tionists.
"One would have a devil of time
trying to explain in terms of liberal
and conservative factors how you
have (such) a decision with eight
justices," Rosenblum said.
Two other cases decided in the last
few months show O'Connor playing
a critical role.
In Sattazahn v. Pennsylvania, she
cast the deciding vote, siding with
the conservative branch to reject a
man's argument that he was being
tried for double jeopardy after he
had asked for a second trial and
received the death penalty.
Last October, along with the same
group of justices, O'Connor voted to
refuse to reconsider the 1989 Stan-
ford v. Kentucky decision, allowing
the execution of 16 and 17 year old
juveniles.
But O'Connor and Kennedy have
also repeatedly sided with the liber-
als last year, most notably in Atkins
v. Virginia, where in a 6-3 vote, the
court declared mentally retarded
individuals could not receive the
death penalty.

the michigan daily

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LOOKING FOR FEMALE grad. student to
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MAY LEASES AVAILABLE! Large con-
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Fall leases avail. 741-9300
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MEDICAL STUDENTS. AVAILABLE FALL.
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2 BDRM. SUBLET now-Aug (neg) $850.
hardwoods. free util., laundry, prkg., storage,
bus, near central campus 222-9058.
2 PERSON SUBLEASE spring/summer
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Good loc. S. Forest. Call 248-736-1733.
AVAIL. MAY-AUG. RMS. in 6 bdrms. hse.
$400/mo. utils. incl., 5 min. from Diag. Call
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A pts, Sublets & R1ms

!!BARTENDERS WANTED,$300/DAY
potential, no experience necessary, training
provided. 800-965-6520 ext.125
$1500 WEEKLY POTENTIAL mailing our
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Well-respected local business needs responsi-
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**RESIDENT MANAGERS NEEDED.
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Email dsa@umich.edu
HAVE THE SUMMER of Your Life & Get
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INSTRUCTIONAL ASSISTANT NEEDED
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BROWSE & LIST FREE!

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E*T1 I I11IJ:] IU RI 'lf
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ACTORS NEEDED FOR Summer Orienta-
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ATITENTION: R.A'S
CAMP WAYNE FOR GIRLS - Northeast
Pennsylvania (6/19-8/16/03) If you love chil-
dren and want a caring, fun environment we
need female staff as Directors and Instructors
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Waterskiing, Sailing, Team Sports, Ropes,

BARTENDER TRAINEES
I $250 per day potential, local positions
Call 1-800-293-3985 ext. 607

NEEDED

2 GREAT TIM MCGRAW tickets for 3/22
needing to swap for 3/21,665-7192.

I

NEAR KERRYTOWN! GREAT LOCATION!

I PING BREA a e i'aWai

i I

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I I

I AlL, __;NOR

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