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February 17, 2003 - Image 11

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The Michigan Daily, 2003-02-17

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The Michigan Daily - SportsMonday - February 17, 2003 - 3B

YESTERDAY'S GAME

Michigan State
Michigan

82
55

(M)
By Josh Holman
Daily Sports Writer

can't buy a bucket

'STEVE
JACKSON

Gueva-rant
"We just need somebody to be a go-
to (player) on the perimeter, and
right now, we just don't (have one),"
- Michigan coach Sue Guevara, on her
team's tack of a scoring threat outside
of the paint.
Key Stat
.596
Michigan State's field goal percentage.
The Spartans actually went 16-of-21 in
the second half to finish off the Wolver-
ines for good.
Daily's MVP
Kristin Nawlel
The sophomore guard burned the
Wolverines for a career-high 22 points
on 10-of-14 shooting. On top of her hot
shooting, Haynie also pulled down 6
rebounds and dished out 8 assists in
40 minutes of play.
YESTERDAY' S GAME
Michigan State (82)
FG FT REB
MIN M-A M-A 0-T A F PTS
Bromfield 29 7-13 3-4 1-3 5 3 19
Shimek 35 6-11 1-1 2-9 1 2 13
Roehrig 15 4-6 3-3 2-4 0 4 11
Haynie 40 10-14 1-2 0-6 8 0 22
Bowen 40 3-6 0-0 0-3 1 1 9
Pagel 20 2-2 0-0 1-2 0 5 4
Callier 19 2-5 0-0 0-2 1 3 4
Osmer 2 0-0 0-0 0-0300
Totals 200 34.57 8-40 8.33 16 18 82
FG%:.596. FT%: .800. 3-point FG: 6-10.600
(Bowen 3-3, Bromfield 2-6, Haynie 1-1). Blocks: 5
(Roehrig 3, Callier, Shimek). Steals: 5 (Haynie 3,
Bromfield, Shimek). Turnovers: 10 (Bromfield 3,
Callier 2, Haynie 2, Pagel 2, Bowen). Technical
Fouls: none.
MICHIGAN (55)
FG FT REB
MIN M-A M-A 0-T A F PTS
Pool 26 2-5 0.0 1-4 2 3 5
Bies 13 0-0 0-0 0-2 0 2 0
Smith 32 9-16 9-10 5-12 0 2 27
Carney 22 0-2 0-0 0.0 2 0 0
Reams 28 2-7 2-4 1-2 3 0 7
Andrews 11 0-3 0-0 0-0 0 1 0
Hauser-Price 8 1-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 2
Goodlow 21 2-8 4-4 1-3 2 1 8
Gandy 22 2-8 2-2 2-3 2 2 6
Burlin 17 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 1 0
Totals 200 1851 17-2011-281 11 55
FG%: .353. FT%: .850. 3-point FG: 2-9,_222 (Pool 1-
2, Reams 1-4). Blocks: 3 (Smith 2, Bies). Steals: 6
(Reams 2, Gandy, Hauser-Price, Pool, Smith).
Turovers:15 (Pool 4, Carney 3, Gandy 3, Smith 2,
Burlin, Goodlow, Reams). Technical fouls: none.
Michigan State ............42 40 - 82
Michigan...................24 31 - 55
At: Crisler Arena, Ann Arbor
Attendance: 4,474

Two things became extremely apparent in yesterday's
women's basketball game between Michigan and Michigan
State. The Spartans can shoot the ball. The Wolverines can-
not.
It's no secret that the strength of the Wolverine offense is
the high-low post play, but it never became so obvious that
that seems to be the only part of the Michigan gameplan.
Michigan's 35.3 field goal percentage was the fifth straight
game in which the Wolverines shot less than 40 percent.
What's even more disparaging is that most of the
shots they made were easy ones. A glimpse at Michi-
gan's shot chart reveals just four made field goals from
outside the paint. The Wolverines may have a producer
down low in junior forward Jennifer Smith, who scored
-27 points yesterday, but they could-
n't produce anything outside of her.
"We had a lot of people in the stands,
today," Michigan coach Sue Guevara
said. "If you were sitting in the stands gO
and thought we needed a shooter, we
do need a shooter. We need someone to
score consistently."
Conversely, the Spartans had no problem finding a
shooter. Senior Syreeta Bromfield and sophomore
Kristin Haynie repeatedly penetrated on the Michigan
defense and pulled up for the open shot. Bromfield went
7-for-13 shooting for 19 points, while Haynie went 10-
for-14 for a career high 22 points.
"We knew against big post players the jump shot would
be there for us all game," Haynie said. "We could penetrate
and pull up in the middle of the paint."
NO PLACE LIKE HOME?: Yesterday's attendance of 4,474
was the second-biggest ever for a women's basketball
game at Crisler Arena. But it wasn't big enough.
The Michigan sports marketing office was promoting a
Break the Attendance Record Day, which was set last year
against Michigan State at the mark of 4,558.
Area basketball teams and Girl Scouts were given free
admission and 2,500 inflatable fingers were handed out in
an effort to set the record, but as was the trend yesterday, the
effort fell a little short.
Michigan fans can actually thank a loud group of Spar-
tan fans behind the Michigan State bench for coming so
close to the record. The large contingent had its way from
the tip, as the Spartans opened up a 17-point lead in just
over five minutes.
"I don't think the first five minutes was because of the
crowd," Guevara said. "They got on a roll, and we called a
timeout. We just needed a basket."
OLD STORY WITH A NEW TWIST: After a Michigan loss,
there's usually a list of sure-fire reasons explaining why they
lost. Yesterday was no different, as the Wolverines watched
an early 21-4 run and horrible shooting effectively kill their

Bad news: The NCAA is
not done with Michigan

NICOLE TERWILLIGER/Daily
Michigan State's Jennifer Callier (15) rejects forward Jennifer
Smith, who struggled early before scoring 27 points.
chances for victory, just like every other loss.
A new problem arose yesterday, though, as the Spar-
tans shut down every Wolverine except for Smith, turn-
ing Michigan into a one-player team. The Wolverines
can normally expect contribution from a few players
down the bench, and the Jennifer Smith Show proved
that the team concept is something Michigan has to get
back to.
" It's tough to defend a team when you have five peo-
ple that can score," Guevara said. "And it's easy to
defend a team when you only have one person that is
scoring."

ichigan should get further
penalties from the NCAA in
ate March. It's not fair to
Tommy Amaker or his current players,
but I believe that is the way it has to be.
Years ago, the Michigan basketball
program avoided severe punishment for
"the late, great Eddie L. Martin" scan-
dal. Those actually guilty of the crime
survived because of a technicality.
"We can't prove anything," was the
collective cry from the University's
investigators.
Actually, Michigan allowed its basket-
ball program to foster a culture of deceit
that abused the NCAA rules and got
away scot-free thanks to the powerful
silence of collusion.
While the University deserves credit
for going to great lengths to find the
truth -name another school that lever-
aged the power of the FBI to uncover
NCAA violations - it is still guilty of
one of the most egregious infractions in
the history of college sports. More than
a few people looked away because this
bastardization of amateurism brought
untold millions of dollars to the Univer-
sity and $616,000 to the pockets of its
college basketball players.
That is the cold, ugly truth. That is
why the penalties are not over yet.
Thomas Yeager, chairman of the
NCAA's committee on infractions,
grilled University representatives for
five hours Friday. Earlier in the week, he
said that there must be consequences
that really wipe out the advantage
Michigan gained.
I'm sure the University showed Yea-
ger that it has reformed, when they met
on Friday.
The moral fiber coursing through the
veins of Michigan basketball may be
decidedly cleaner now. But that doesn't
change the fact that the advantage has
not been overcome.
Amaker still attracts recruits with
glowing memories of the Fab Five, and
the athletic department's bank account is
still full of cash that can be traced to
black-sock-and-baggy-short-wearing
cheaters.
Do the current self-imposed sanctions
wipe out the advantage the athletic
department gained? I don't think so.
They present further evidence that the
current administration wants justice, but
real justice in this case has been impos-
sible for years.
Now it's about more than fixing the
problems inside Michigan basketball.

It's about making a statement to other
rogue programs. The NCAA needs to
come down strong and prove that you
can't delay a major scandal and get soft-
er penalties as a result.
Michigan is fortunate that it doesn't
face charges of lack of institutional con-
trol or recruiting violations. But saying
this was just a case of extra benefits is
like saying the Minnesota basketball
scandal was just a case of cheating on a
couple homework assignments. There is
no comparable case to Michigan's.
I'm not going to play the guessing
game about what the specific NCAA
ruling will be. But the items on the
table include additional years of pro-
bation, scholarship reductions, and
further postseason bans. It may not be
the most likely scenario, but missing
another postseason or two could cost
Michigan some of its top recruits,
some of its best players or even its
head coach. Players who leave a
school on probation are eligible to
play for another school right away.
If I were Amaker - a legitimate can-
didate for national coach of the year right
now - or Bernard Robinson or Daniel
Horton, I would be contemplating my
options in the event that the Maize and
Blue ship hits another iceberg.
Fortunately for Michigan fans, those
men are much more focused and
stronger-willed than I am.
Despite facing more distractions than
the NBA's Portland Jailblazers, the
Wolverines are playing great basketball
and sitting atop the Big Ten standings,
even though no one else on Earth
expected them to contend at all.
For another month, we can enjoy the
clean and successful program that has
been the story of the year. For another
month, we can jump up and down and
watch the team hold its opponent to 54
points one night and outscore the next
team with a barrage of 3-point bombs.
But when the Madness of late March
finally arrives, we will all be asked to
rise and listen to the NCAA's final sen-
tencing in this case.
I think that will be another "day of
shame." Hopefully, I'm wrong.
Chris Webber has joined Gary Condit,
the Ramsey parents and O.J Simpson in
the search for the real killer Ifyou have
any relevant information on the untimely
death of Eddie L. Martin, please send it
to Steve Jackson at sjackso@umich.edu.

Smith lone bright spot in loss

BIG TEN

STANDINGS
Conference Overall

Team
Penn State
Purdue
Minnesota
Michigan State
Ohio State
Illinois
Iowa
Wisconsin
Indiana
Michigan
Northwestern

W
11
9
8
8
8
6
5
5
4
2
2

L
2
3
4
4
5
6
7
8
8
10
11.

w
21
20
19
15
17
14
13
7
11
11
7

L
6
4
4
8
7
9
10
17
11
12
17

Weekend results:
Michigan State 82, MICHIGAN 55
IowA 80, Penn State 75
MINNESOTA 73, Ohio State 50
PURDUE 79, Illinois 67
Indiana 49, WISCONSIN 48

Thursday's games:
Michigan at PENN STAE
Indiana at NORTHWESTERN
Minnesota at IOWA
Michigan State at PURDUE
, ~ Sunday's games:
Michigan at INDIA
Purdue at OHIO STATE
Iowa at WIScONSIN
Penn State at MINNESOTA

7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
8 p.m.
2 p.m.
1 p.m.
1:30 p.m.
2 p.m.

By Daniel Bremmer
Daily Sports Writer
Michigan center Jennifer Smith sat
at the post-game press conference with
a bag of ice on her previously-injured
right knee, which had kept her out of
five games earlier this season.
Surprisingly, she only had one bag
of ice.
Following Michigan's embarrassing
82-55 loss to Michigan State - its
second such embarrassment in three
games - Smith had emerged as the
only scoring force on the Michigan
women's basketball team in one of its
most physical games this season.
During the first-half, Smith strug-
gled inside, getting bumped on nearly
every touch. The physical play hin-
dered Smith, who connected on just
two of her eight first-half shots. But
she managed to get to the line and con-
vert on each of her five free throws.
Coming out of the lockerroom trail-
ing 42-24, Smith had a fire beneath
her, going from the victim of the attack
to the attacker herself. She connected
on four field goals in the first five
minutes and finished the half shooting
7-for-8 from the field - good for 27
points in the game, just two off her
career high.
One huge difference for Smith
between halves was her mentality.
"I knew that no one could stop me
(in the second half)," Smith said. "I
just went really aggressive (to the bas-
ket) every time I got the ball."
Each of Smith's seven made shots in
the second half were from inside the
paint, with her one miss coming from
the top of the key.
Michigan State coach Joanne
McCallie gave Smith credit for her
second-half domination, but felt her
SPARTANS
Continued from Page 18
Spartans had three other starters in
double figures, and one scoring nine.
"Kristin Haynie and Syreeta
(Bromfield) did a really nice job of
penetrating," Guevara said. "Penetra-
tion is one of the toughest things in
basketball to defend."
With just Smith scoring, the Spar-
tans were able to clamp down on
defense against everyone else. Just
two other Wolverines scored more
than six points, all of them shooting
below 30 percent.
The big difference between the Spar-
tans and the Wolverines was Michigan
State's ability was to hit jump shots.
Michigan missed every shot outside the
paint - 0-for-9 - in the second half,
while the Spartans could take advan-
tage of iumners from 15 feet and in.

team's fouls hurt its inside presence.
"She's an excellent, excellent player,
and she did a very, very good job,"
McCallie said. "She worked hard on
the low block, and I think at times we
got a little bit out of position. We got in
foul trouble, and that caused us to not
play aggressively at times when we
needed to."
Smith's intensity in the second half
was something that was missing from
most of the Wolverines. Co-captain
Raina Goodlow, freshman Niki Reams
and junior Stephanie Gandy connected
on just 3-of-13 shooting in the second
half. Senior co-captain LeeAnn Bies
played just two second-half minutes, as
Michigan coach Sue Guevara wanted
to play a quicker lineup with just one
center to aid her team's press.
Without Smith's stats, Michigan's
second-half mark of 42-percent shoot-
ing (1 -of-26) would have dropped to
just 22 percent (4-of-18). Reams'
jumper with 17:25 remaining was the
team's only second-half field goal from
outside the paint in its 10 attempts.
Despite yesterday's embarrassing
loss (Michigan's seventh straight),
Guevara believes that her team has
not quit on her and is still giving 100
percent, based on its performance in
practice.
"No, this team hasn't quit. We
haven't," Guevara said. "I think that
maybe people will look at maybe
being frustrated as quitting, and
there's a difference."
While Smith doesn't believe her
teammates have given up hope, she
added a different perspective in addi-
tion to just frustration.
"Some people have lost focus, I
guess you'd say," Smith said. "I think
we all need to be on the same page, go
out there and look to dominate."

REC
SPORTS
INTRAMURAL S

The University of Michigan
Department of Recreational Sports
Intramural Sports Program
www.recsports.umich.edu
734-763-3562

GO GREEN, GO WHITE
Before its two losses this season, the
Michigan womn's basketball team had
previously beaten Michigan State in four
straight games.
Dcwe W7L Scor
Feb. 16, 2003 Jtoss 82-55
Jan. 30, 2003 Less 73-56
Jan. 2, 2002 Win 58-45
Jan. 25, 2001 Win 58-49
Feb. 20, 2000 Win 90-87 j
Dec. 30, 1999 Win 64-61

At~t~i
. y ,
Vrc.I,

Entries taken:
Mon, 02/17 ONLY
11:00 AM - 5:30 PM
IM Building.
Entry Fee:
$80.00 per team
Manager's Meeting:
MANDATORY
Wed, 02/19
6:00 PM
IM Building
Play begins:
Mon, 03/03
IM Building
yba l

ii

REC
SPORTS
I NT R A MURALS

'M' STATS

Player
Smith
Pool
Bies
Gandy
Reams
Goodlow
Andrews
Hauser-Price
Burlin
Carney
McPhilamy
Cortis

G
18
23
23
23
21
23
22
20
21
21
11
10

Min
26.3
28.1
24.0
30.7
25.4
16.0
17.9
11.5
15.6
14.4
3.3
3.4

A
0.9
1.7
1.0
2.0
2.0
1.2
1.9
0.8
1.4
1.7
0.0
0.2

Reb
6.6
7.0
5.2
4.7
2.9
2.8
1.7
0.6
1.9
0.8
0.5
0.4

Pts.
13.1
11.5
10.3
10.2
7.4
6.2
4.0
3.6
2.1
1.0
1.0
0.8

Field-goal percentage leaders
Smith 88-165 .533
3-point percentage leaders
Gandy 18-46 .391
Free-throw percentage leaders
Smith 52-61 .852
Steals leaders
Gandy 34 1.5
Turnover leaders
Pool 90 3.9
Blocks leaders
Bies 61 1.2
UPCOMING
PENN STATE
Tme: 7 p.m. Thursday
t nState College
Michigan's heartbreaking 72-70 loss

Entries taken:
Mon, 02/17 ONLY
11:00 AM - 5:30 PM
IM Building
Entry Fee:
$70.00 per team
Manager's Meeting:
MANDATORY
Wed, 02/19
8:00 PM
IM Buiding
Play begins:
Tues, 03/04
Sports Coliseum
MintwSoccer

Entries due:
Tuesday, 02/18
5:00 PM
IM uilding
Entry Fee:
$25.00 per team
Meet Date:
Wednesday, 02/19
Indoor Track
Entries taken:
Mon, 02/17 ONLY
11:00AM-5:30PM
IM Building
Co-rec, Womens &
Sorority ONLY
Entry Fee:
$80.00 per team
Manager's Meeting:
MANDATORY
Wed, 02/19
7:00 PM
IM Building
0 Play begins:
Mon, 03/03
Yost Ice Arena
Broomball

NICOLE TERWILLIGER/Daily

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