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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, January 22, 2003 - 7

COLEMAN BUS
Continued from Page 1 Continue
values and its goals and it represents a "His t
time for the institution to pause and issues," i
reflect on its mission, its history and its The C
contributions," Connell said. based la
Students noted that Coleman could who sue
use her inauguration as an opportunity said the
to raise student interest in the Universi- on race-
ty by promising to include them in made his
decision-making processes. Eveni
"The inauguration will be more race can
important if (Coleman) makes it Universil
clear that the students opinions mat- said.
ter," LSA sophomore Nathaniel Both L
Damren said. "If the students are will be r
involved in the governing apparatus 1 in fro
of the University, they'll be more Bollinger
interested." Universit
Coleman's inauguration will be a a.m.
daylong event, as an academic sym- Politic
posium at the Power Center and a ral to the
tour of the President's house on base and
South University Street will follow the same1
the actual ceremony. All events will "This
be free to provide access for all is tryingt
interested in attending. his positi
DEBATE
Continued from Page 1
said that in Klein's eyes, "there are people in the
world who are good (Israelis) and there are people
who are bad (Palestinians).
"You can use this explanation for anything. Peo-
ple make racist arguments to explain things away.
Basically, until the bad people become good, we
don't have to treat them any better," Abunimah
added.
When the panelists were asked what their one
message to the University community would be,
both were clear about which point they wanted to
emphasize.
"University of Michigan - don't reward terror-
ism," Klein said. "Terrorists should know that they
won't get land. They won't get anything if they con-
tinue."
Abunimah asked the University community to
"understand that there are those in Israel as well as
Jews all over who don't' support the extremist view
of my opponent and their voices are not being
heard. People need to hear a wide range of views
and they did not get that in the pro-Israeli side
tonight," Abunimah said.
A number of Jews in attendance expressed
their distaste for Klein's opinions, saying Klein's
the michigan daily

SH
d from Page 1
brief doesn't tackle the issue. His brief ducks the
Peterson said.
Center for Individual Rights, a Washington-
w firm, represents the rejected white applicants
ed the University. CIR spokesman Curt Levey
president did not need to state a clear opinion
conscious policies yesterday because his brief
s stance on the issue clear.
if Bush or members of his administration feel that
be used as an admissions factor, they believe the
ty's policies push constitutional limits too far, Levey
Levey and Peterson said their respective legal teams
eady to present half-hour-long oral arguments April
nt of the Supreme Court justices. Grutter v.
r, which challenges the admissions policies of the
ty's Law School, will be first heard, starting at 10
al science Prof. Michael Traugott said Bush's defer-
Supreme Court is an attempt to preserve his voting
avoid alienating moderate and minority voters at
time.
is a very common political ploy," Traugott said. "He
to offend as few people as possible, but essentially
on is conservative."
views were not indicative of all Jews. "Mr.
Klein's stance is not one that many progressive
Jews share," Rackham student Greg Epstein
said. "The pro-Palestinian side made some good
points. That's not to say that I agree with every-
thing he said, but he was right to say that this
particular speaker doesn't represent Jews, Israel
or Judaism. ... I don't feel like this man speaks
for me whatsoever."
Few events on campus are sponsored joint-
ly by pro-Palestinian and pro-Israeli groups,
and many people were unsure if the debate
would ease campus tension and promote
understanding. "I'm not sure it accomplished
anything, but if it accomplishes something,
let it be that both sides hear and actually lis-
ten to the other point of view," Law student
David Wolkinson said.
"No matter what kind of event is sponsored,
you're always going to have a skewed view of the
truth," said Bashar AI-Madani, a member of Stu-
dents Allied for Freedom and Equality.
"People need to educate themselves. Too many
people hide behind one cause or another. I hope
people take these views and then take the initiative.
to educate themselves. This is a conflict that will be
resolved through reason and logic - not passion
and emotion."

CSP
Continued from Page 1.
nificant boost from the University's use of race as an admissions fac-
tor, Collins said he hopes CSP will be able to continue providing spe-
cialized classes and counseling if the Supreme Court rules the
policies unconstitutional.
Yesterday, the Supreme Court announced it will hear oral arguments
April lfor the two lawsuits that challenge its admissions policies in LSA
and the Law School.
Engineering sophomore Brandelyn Heath said some of her friends took
Summer Bridge classes, and they felt the program familiarized them with
the University but did not completely close the gap between them and
other students.
Through CSP, students can also take specialized sections of introducto-
ry courses in chemistry, English, mathematics and accounting during the

fall or winter terms. The program also provides nearly 2,000 participating
students - not all of whom are minorities - with tutoring and career
counseling.
Comprehensive studies Prof. Fran Zorn said many of the stu-
dents who attend her classes often felt in high school that teachers
and counselors did not care about their academic potential.
"If someone doesn't have the background and is willing to learn, I'm
willing to work with them," she said. "We at CSP believe in their poten-
tial and try to develop that."
Zorn said certain CSP seminars also focus on professional prepa-
ration and encourage students to decide which career they would
enjoy pursuing. "(Students) go on into medical school, pharmacy, public
health ... I feel I've had real success with people,"she said.
After enrolling in the CSP program and graduating from the Uni-
versity, a student Zorn knew went on to attend the University of Indi-
ana Law School.

APPROVAL
Continued from Page 1.
ability to turn the economy around."
Also, Huth said Americans proba-
bly feel a lack of support for the
administration's plan of action in
the Middle East.
"The American public may feel the
administration is moving too hastily
toward a decision to initiate a militaryj
invasion," he said.
LSA sophomore Lance Betway said
he feels Americans are recognizing the
threat of war and are choosing to show
their disapproval of the Bush adminis-
tration.
"The voice of those who have sons
and daughters and brothers and sisters
and friends who can potentially be sent
off to die is finally loud enough to
compare with the constant roar of
those with the money," he said.
WANT TO WORK FOR
THEi MICHIGAN
DAILY?
ATTEND A MASS
METING FEB. 3, 6
OR 11 AT?7 R.MIN
THE SUDENTr
PuUCAnONS
BUILING.

HOUSING
Continued from Page 1
porch with her prospective tenant managers.
When the housemates initially viewed the con-
dition of the porch, they inquired about the safety
of the porch. However, their concerns were quick-
ly dismissed by the landlords, who told the house-
mates the porch was completely safe, Grady said.
Judy Paron, property manager for Oppen-
heimer, said responsibility for the accident lies
solely with the city.
"The city gave us a clean bill of health, so this
was something we were totally unaware of,"
Paron said, referring to the unsafe porch. "It's an
unfortunate circumstance, but there are no viola-
tions," Paron added.
Liz Sturgis of Arbor Maintenance, the repair sub-
contractor for Oppenhiemer, said all the city inspec-
tor orders of repair were made before the
housemates moved in. However, many of the main-
tenance problems the housemates reported when
they moved in were on the original inspector's
report, including non-functional door locks and
reinstallation of a fire escape.
"After the porch collapsed they said we were top
priority. It's sad that it takes a medical condition and
a huge incident like that to become top priority,"
Furtado said.
Still, the housemates lived with a caved-in
porch for more than five weeks before any
repairs were made to it, Furtado said. During
this time, Furtado was immobilized by her
cast and unable to leave the house through the
side door on her own.
Paron said the extensive lack of repair on the
porch is the fault of the insurance company.
Furtado's parents, Robert and Tess Furtado,
were angered by the treatment both they and
their daughter received from Oppenheimer fol-

lowing the accident, and said they plan to file a
lawsuit for damages.
"It seems like a clear case of negligence,"
said Tess Furtado, adding she has spent up to
$6,000 on medical costs, airplane fares and
other necessities since her daughter's accident.
She said Oppenheimer was very rude and
uncooperative with her and her husband when
they attempted to reconcile the affair with the
landlords.
"My husband was very put off by the landlord's
attitude with him over the phone. He calmly tried
to ask them to reduce the rent, as the lease stated
was permissible under special circumstances, but
they adamantly refused to give the kids any com-
pensation," Tess Furtado said.
Vanessa Furtado said that the experience shows
that student's voices often go unheard by the Uni-
versity, landlords and the city.
"All we wanted to do was communicate
with them and they kept putting us off. They
didn't want to talk to (me and my house-
mates) at all, which really made us feel not in
control of our situation," she said. "They
make you feel like you're asking for these
outrageous things, like you're spoiled chil-
dren making ridiculous demands, when they
are just little things that you hope will ensure
your safety and comfort."
Furtado and her parents said they were disap-
pointed by the lack of support they received from
the University.
"The University of Michigan is a wonderful
institution with a wonderful reputation," Tess
Furtado but these kids have unsafe living con-
ditions. You pay for the reputation. You pay for
the good education, so you assume that they
are going to be taken care of by the University
and by the city of Ann Arbor in safe housing
conditions."

HOUSE FOR RENT for 6, 852 Brookwood
$2250/mo. Prkg., wshr./dryer, & 1g. bdrms.
Please call 248-214-8708.
JANUARY OCCUPANCY
CAMPUS AREA APARTMENTS
Wilson White Company, Inc.
734.995.9200
www.wilsonwhitecompany.com
Equal Housing Opportunity
LARGE FURNISHED 2 & 3 bdrm. apt. on S.
State, Near UM bus stop, 5 min. to Michigan
Union. Avail. Now, Winter & Fall '03 lease.
Heat & water incl., 2-sink bath., Intercom/sec.
buzzer, New furniture, New appliance, Balc.,
A/C, Prkg., Ldry. For 2-4. $1100-$1600, no
smoking/no pets. 734-996-3539 or 734-678-
7250, ehtseng@comcastnet
MCKINLEY ST. SPACIOUS 1&2 bdrm.
apts. Bay windows, fireplace, balc., A/C, cov-
ered prkg. A private shuttle to North Campus.
Fall leases avail. 741-9300
www.annarborapartments.net
MEDICAL STUDENTS. AVAILABLE FALL.
Large efficiencies, one and two bedroom
apartments located near the Medical Campus.
Lots of Amenities. Call Michigan Realty,
662-5500 or wwwmichcomrealty.com. EHO.
MODERN 2 BDRM. apt. @ 1015 E. Ann. 2
blocks from hospital. $1165-1220/mo., 12
month lease, begins Aug. 29th. Prkg., Idry.,
no pets. 663-6138.
NEAR KERRYTOWN! GREAT LOCATION!
Spacious studio & I bdrm. apts. Fall leases
r avail. 741-9300 www.annarboraparlmentsnet
NEAR UNION LARGE contemporary stu-
dio, 1, 2 bdrm. apts. Garage prkg. May & Fall
leases avail. 741-9300
www.annarborapartments.net
NEEDA9 MONTH LEASE?
You Want It-We Got It!
Leasing Spring/Fall 2003,761-2680.
OLD WEST SIDE- Great 1 & 2 furnished
bdrm. apts. for the economy-minded student.
Bus stops outside your front door. Call Varsity
Mgmt. 668-1100.
OLDY BUT GOODY- Great 2 bdrm. apt. w/
lots of nooks & crannies. Call Varsity Mgmt.
for appt. 668-1100.
ONE,TWO, & THREE BDRM. unfum. apts., in
turn of the century homes avail, for Fall 2003
occupancy. Located at Fifth Ave. & Williams.
Call 761-8990 for details.
PETS WELCOME- CONTEMPORARY
1&2 bdrm. apts. Great campus locations. Call
for details 741-9300.
RESIDENT MANAGER monthly rent credit
for your May and Fall lease. Call 741-9657.
ROOM FOR RENT in 6 person hse. New
kitch. & bath. Rent neg. Prkg. incl. All guy
roommates. Call 417-9801.
ROOMS ABOUT CAMPUS. Short term
leases, shared common areas, all remodeled.
Prkg. avail. From $450/mo. 973-7368.
SORORITY HOUSE FOR LEASE. Over
twenty-two (22!) 1g. bdrms., 16,000 SF, close
to U of M campus, ample common area.
$910,000 cash or $11,500/mo. Call Jeff @
734-662-3690.

OFFICE OFNEW STUDENT PROGRAMS BABYSITTER NEEDED FOR well-
Now hiring student for the summer. Position behaved, fun Syr. old girl, Thurs. 5-9pm and 1
will be 40 hrs/wk. at $7.25/hr. Job will include weekend night per week. Own trans. Ref(s).
assisting students and parents with orientation helpful 657-6542.
registration, answering of telephones, and spe-
cial projects. Must be friendly, motivated and FAMILY RELOCATING TO the distant area
willing to provide information/assistance. Ap- needs someone to care for 4 yr. old. girl in our
plication are available until February 14th at home. Req. include infant care exp., valid
3511 Student Activities Building. drivers license and 3 refs., own transportation.

1 BDRM. APT. Solid & Sunny. Walk to
downtown & campus. $650 or best offer.
Immed. Occupancy to 7/31/03. Call
734.913.6979 or 3133302737 for info.
1 BLOCK AWAY FROM CAMPUS
Washington Manor Apts., 418 E. Washington.
Beautiful furn. I bdrm. Sublet. New carpet.
Call Varsity Mgmt. for appt. 668-1100.
2 PERSON SUBLEASE spring/summer
semester. Large living space. Prkg. included.
Good loc. S.Forest. Call 248.766.1491. .
AVAIL. IMMED. 1 bdrm. fully furn., heat &
water incld., A/C, balc., Washington & Divi-
sion. $500/mo. Call Matt 734-846-3551.
AVAIL. NOW WILLIAM & Division Sub-
lease. Eff. & 1 Bdrm. Sec. Buzzer, Laundry &
Storage. Gallatin Realty co. 994-1202 ext. 16.
CONGENIAL, MATURE ROOMMATES
seek subletter, Ig. rm., 5 blks. from Kerrytown,
Idry., prkg., $325/mo., contact 734-645-9304.
MAY-AUG. SUBLET. 2 person eff. in a 3
story hse. on S. University. Minutes from Cen-
tral Campus. Full kitch., bath, wireless inter-
net, cable, util(s). incl. $1100/mo. neg.
Please call 678-3128.
ROOM IN LARGE house w/6 guys. Prime
loc. Close to campus. Rent neg. Call Noel @
834-7982 or contact Campus Rental.

The Detroit area REI stores are looking for a
SPECIAL EVENTS COORDINATOR. Bring your
previous experience with event planning and
budgeting and come join one of America's '100
Best Companies to Work For."
You will work in both our Troy and Northville
stores and be responsible for planning, promot-
ing and executing clinics, corporate promo-
tions, and event sponsorships for both store
locations. You will work with your district mar-
keting team to develop community and media
relations. Come help us attract new members,
and measurably contribute to overall sales and
membership goals.
In addition to your previous work experience,
you will be an ideal candidate if you possess
excellent written and verbal communication skills
and follow-through, a demonstrated commit-
ment to quality customer service, strong
computer skills and knowledge of REI and the
products that we sell.
To apply, please send an electronic cover
letter and resume to either the Northville or
Troy REI locations.
Northville REI:
Alison Washburn, Store Manager
(awashbu@rel.com)
Troy REI:
Ron Rodriguez, Store Manager
(rrodrlg~rel.com)
REI is proud to be an Equal Opportunity Employer
BARTENDERS NEEDED!!
NO experience necessary!! Earn up to
$300/day!! 1.866291.1884 ext. u1079.
CARING MOTHER'S HELPER needed for 2
yr. old boy. Mon. or Tues. morning. Opportu-
nity for more hrs. in spr.sum. Must have own
transportation and ref(s). Call Sara 663-8090.
EARLY CHILDHOOD SUBSTITUTES
have lots of fun while working w/ young chil-
dren. NAEYC accredited center needs your
help. Great for those specializing in PsychJEd-
ucation. Bilingual and men welcome. Call the
director at 668-0887.
GREAT EXP. FOR LAW SCHOOL. P/T
transcriber and/or clerk needed for small local
law firm. Flex. schedule. 734-572-0200.
HAVE THE SUMMER of Your Life & Get
Paid For It!! Camp Counselors needed for
Tennis, Arts, Athletics, and more! Apply on-
line at www.pineforestcamp.com
HEALTHY FEM. ADOLESCENTS 13-24
yrs. needed for a study. Should have no fam-
ily or personal history of a psychiatric disorder.
Overnight stay, FDA approved drug and
blood draws. Will pay $150. Call 615-4774.
JOIN THE FORMER CEO OF WALMART
in an exploding intemet business!
http://successcourse.com/ca

P/T TO F/T sales oriented person needed to
join our Internet software team in Westland.
Learn about Internet marketing techniques and
tools. Work w/ online companies on the cut-
ting edge. Must have exp. working w/ comput-
ers and the Internet. For info. call 734-728-
4500 ext: 228 fax or email resume to April
734-728-7810 or April@kowabunga.net
P/T, FLEX. HRS. for person to assist in pro-
duction at local advertising/publishing com-
pany. Need to be proficient w/Pagemaker
(MAC) & Photoshop. Will also assist in main-
taining mailing lists, filing, billing, routine of-
fice functions. Approximately 10-15 hrs./wk.
Please e-mail your resume or brief description
of your qualifications tojan@jjadvpub.com
PARENT'S HELPER ERRANDS, cooking,
household routines, long-term postion. M, W,
Th afternoons. 13 hr/wk. $11/hr. Need car,
exp. & ref(s). 734-995-1172.
PIECE OF APT. overlooking Atlantic in Mi-
ami for share care of wonderful old woman
writer/artist. Maybe small stipend. Perfect for
writers/grad students/nurse or two. 214-9821.
RAYMOND JAMES & ASSOCIATES has a
current opening for a part time cashier/recep-
tionist. Exc. comm. skills and attention to de-
tail required. Please call Robert McAlmont for
further details 734-930-0555.
Raymond Jamesis an EOE employer.
SCIENTIFIC EQUIPMENT manufac-
turer needs literature distribution help on cam-
pus. Serious inquiries only. Email to
john.battista@kodak.com with "literature" in sub-
ject line for more information.
SCOREKEEPERS IS NOW HIRING Cooks,
Floormen and waitstaff for immediate open-
ings. Bring your class schedule and apply to-
day at 310 Maynard A2 - Across from Borders
Books Downtown. 995-0100.
WWW.EARNPARIIME.COM ALL
STUDENTS - P/T flex. work. No telemarketing!
No door-to-door. Scholarships avail. Pro-
grams taught as a college course at Purdue
University. Train exp. in customer sales/ser-
vice. $14.50 base/appt. Interviewing immed.
Call (734) 944-1223 ask for Marisa.

pref. 40-50 hrs/wk. M-F. Call 636-462-3330.
FLEXIBLE CHILD CARE
25 hrsl$250/week.Afteroons & nights in
Ann Arbor. Must love children and dogs, non-
smkr., driver's license & car, & references.
623-1275.
LOVING BABYSITTER NEEDED! Tue.
afternoons, $10/hr. 2 children ages 4 yrs. & 8
mo. We prefer someone who will be avail. this
summer and next year. Cathy 623-8460.
LOVING PERSON WANTED to care for a
delightful 4 yr. old girl. 1, 2, or 3 afternoon-
s/wk. Ref(s)., own transportation 995-0298.
SEEKING CARE FOR fun 3 YR. old boy for
U of M spring break (afternoons), other times
as needed. Close to campus. $10/hr. 668-8510.

on Splash Tours
1.SSSA2S.711S wwsuDias" sIt om
SPRING BREAK 2003 with STS
America's #1 Student Tour Operator
Sell Trips earn cash Travel Free
"Inforimation/Reservations
1-800-648-4849 or wwwstsmvel.com
SPRING BREAK IS now sponsored by Stu-
dent Express! 4, 5, & 7 night Spring Break
vacations to Cancun, Acapulco, Mazatlan, S.
Padre, Jamaica, Florida, Bahamas, and Las
Vegas. #1 parties with exclusive appearances
by DJ SKRIBBLE and SHAGGY!! Reliable
air and hotel. Book NOW and get $30 rebate
PLUS 2 for 1 MEAL PLANS. Call 303-696-
1155 or visit www.studentexpress.com for de-
tails. Starting at $439!!!!
SPRING BREAK!
BAHAMAS Party Crise
$279
5 Days,Includes 10 Free Meals,
Free Parties & Drink Specials!
Incl. Port, Departure, Hotel Tax!
wwwspringbreaktravel.com
1-800-678-6386

BEAT THE WINTER BLUES with U-Move
Fitness. Kickboxing, step, water aerobics,
weight training, yoga, & more. 764-1342.
GOT THE FLU? A cough that won't quit?
And your family doctor is 3,000 miles away?
Dr. Lutwin is here to help you with your 'ail-
ing' blues. Call 734-971-7694 for an appt. and
directions to our medical facility. Walk-ins
welcome. Most insurance plans accepted.
PROFESSIONAL DRY CLEANERS! Shirts
and drop off service. Summer storage avail.
Comer of N. University & Thayer.
715 N. University or Call 662-1906.
THESIS EDITING. Language, organization,
format. All disciplines 25 years U-M experi-
ence. 734/9960566, writeon@htdconnect.com

#1 SPRING BREAK VACATIONS! Can-
cun, Jamaica, Bahamas, & Florida. Best Par-
ties, Best Hotels, Best Prices! Group Dis-
counts, Group organizers travel free! Space is
limited! Hurry Up & Book Now! 1-800-234-
7007. www.endlesssumnmertourscom
***ACT NOW! LAST Chance to Guarantee
the Best Spring Break Prices to all Destina-
tions. REPS needed...Travel Free, Earn $$$.
Group Discounts for 6+.
wwwJeisuretours.com/800-838-8203.
7 NIGHTS. CANCUN $599
Call Melissa 761-1300,Huron Valley Travel.
SOUTH PADRE 2/2 & 3/3 $150. Private
owner giving discount. (941)642 - 5483
PANAMA ACbt fi
&'/PE --LOW PRICES:
B5eacon'l
&EAC/,'FESORT
ilhe rn Pla~

SPRING BREAK!
PANAMA City Beach
Boardwalk Beach Resort $199
Includes 7 Nights Hotel,
6 Free Parties!
24 Hours Free Drinks!
Cancun & Jamaica!
From $459
www.springbreaktravel.com
1-800-678-6386

BOXING - MENS Boxing Club recruiting
new members. Beginners welcome. Meets @
coliseum. MW 7-9 or TTh 4:30-6:30. Info
930-3246. Try a new sport this winter!
REWARD $1000 FOR info. leading to the ar-
rest and conviction of the 4 cowards that com-
mitted serious assault outside Ricks Sat.1/11@
2 AM. Believed to have fled in a dark Blazer.
Please contactA2 Police Detective Bureau.

TRANSCRIPTION/WORD PROCESSING
SERVICE. Professional,Accurate& Efficient JUNGLE MARKETING GROUP. HOME
Contact: Kathleen (734) 971-6742. BASED OPPORTUNITY To make e-
commerce work for you! Call 877-851-0128
Sor email nalong@tbigj.com

SUMMER INTERNSHIPS! Develop your
comm., people, and management skills. Salary
$400/wk. + bonuses. More info. contact Paul,
interships2003@aol.comor 1-800-405-6227.
WANTED *SPRJSUM.INTERNS must be
rebels, innovators, dissenters seeking leader-
ship outside the box. Average pay $7200, call
(734) 678-0915 or
jperman@collegeworks.com
whl cr

MAKE MONEY WHILE in college, serious
enquiries only. Call (734)913 - 0686.
MANAGERIAL POSITION PHYSICIAN
collective bargaining association
in U-M hospital seeks self-directed individual
. , 1 .

COLLEGE IS NO TIME TO SUFFER
WITH ACNE! It's time to look good, feel
great, have fun. Our dermatologist recom-
mended acne treatments heal acne fast and are
tint adjustable to perfectly hide blemishes.
Clearer skin is just a click away! Guaranteed.
www.clearmyskin.com

$ CA LLING ALT LJewish students!!$$ Earn

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