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The Michigan Daily - SportsTuesday - January 21, 2003 - 3B

YESTERDAY'S GAME

.Indi ana
Michigan

68
71

Blue

breaks slump

STEVE
JACKSON

First Big Ten win takes monkey off back

Gueva-rant
"This job is more about psycholo-
gy than X's and 0's" - Michigan
coach Sue Guevara, on keeping her
team focused in the Big Ten.
Daily's MVP
LeeAn lies
in her second game coming off the
bench, Bies dropped 19 and helped
establish Michigan's dominance inside.

By Gennaro Filice
Daily Sports Writer

Key Stat
20
Number of free throw attemps by
Michigan. The Wolverines converted
on 20, making more than Indiana
attempted (17).
YESTERDAY'S GAME
Indiana (68)
FG FT REB
MIN M-A M-A 0T A F PTS
Eckart 29 5-13 01 3-8 2 2 11
Branson 22 1-3 3-4 1-3 0 5 5
Gathing 21 2-5 0-0 3-4 0 3 4
DeMuth 33 4-12 2-2 0-2 2 1 10
Valentin 36 6-14 5-5 0-2 3 3 21
Bodine 20 1-4 0-0 0-0 2 1 3
Skapin 4 0.0 0-0 0-0 0 2 0
Hartman 23 35 0-0 0-1 1 2 8
Hawkins 10 1-1 4-4 0-2 0 5 6
Salters 2 0.0 0-1 0-0 0 1 0
Totals 200 23-57 14-17 9-25 10 25 68
FG%:.404. FT%:.824. 3-point FG: 8-19, .421
(Valentin 4-7, Hartman 2-4, Bodine 1-1, Eckart 1-3,
Branson 0-1, DeMuth 0-3). Blocks: 1 (DeMuth).
Steals: 15 (Branson 3, Eckart 2, Gathing 2,
DeMuth 2, Valentin 2, Bodine 2, Hartman,
Hawkins). Turnovers: 20 (Valentin 6, Eckart 4, Bod-
ne 3, DeMuth 2, Skapin 2, Branson, Gathing, Hart-
man). Technical Fouls: none.
MICHIGAN (71)
FG FT REB
MIN M-A M-A 0-T A F PTS
Pool 24 3-11 0-0 0-6 1 3 6
Goodlow 15 3-6 2-4 1-3 2 0 9
Smith 24 4-5 3-3 1-7 3 3 12
Carney 26 1-1 0-1 0-0 2 0 2
Gandy 38 5-8 3-5 1-4 2 2 13
Bies 30 5-7 9-9 2-8 3 4 19
Reams 24 2-4 0-0 1-3 1 3 5
Andrews 11 1-1 2-2 0-1 0 0 4
Hauser-Price 6 0-0 1-2 0-1 0 0 1
Burlin 2 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 1 0
Totals 200 24-43 20.26 7-35 14 16 71
FG%: .558. FT%: .769. 3-point FG: 3-8,_375 (Good-
low 1-1, Smith 1-1, Reams 1-2, Gandy 0.1, Bies 0-1,
Pool 0-2). Blocks: 3 (Goodlow, Smith, Bies). Steals:
13 (Bies 4, Reams 3, Smith 2, Carney 2, Pool,
Gandy). Turnovers: 28 (Pool 6, Smith 6, Carney 3,
Bies 3, Goodlow 2, Reams 2, Burlin 2, Hauser-Price
2, Gandy, Andrews). Technical fouls: none.
Indiana.....................27 41 - 68
Michigan ............38 33 - 71
At: Crisler Arena, Ann Arbor
Attendance: 2,091

Michigan women's basketball team entered Sunday's
game against Indiana winless in Big Ten play. Losing its
first three games to Minnesota, Illinois and Purdue by an
average of 25.7 points per game, the Wolverines were off to
their worst conference start since the 1995-96 campaign.
Although Michigan coach Sue Guevara consistently
attempted keep a positive mindset, she obviously was eager
to harness the team's first Big Ten win of the season.
"When you go 0-3, sometimes you wonder, 'is it ever
going to come?"' Guevara said.
In Guevara's 100th Big Ten game, Michigan (1-3 Big Ten,
10-5 overall) held off a late surge by Indiana (2-3, 9-6), and
defeated the Hoosiers 71-68. With the victory, Guevara
evened her personal mark against Indiana to 6-6, and the
Wolverines finally rid themselves of a notorious primate.
"It's good to get that monkey off our back," senior captain
LeeAnne Bies said.
The anti-"rally monkey" is gone, and the Wolverines look
to continue improving and gaining Big Ten wins.
"I think now that we have our momentum going, then we
can hopefully continue to play as well as we did tonight,"
Bench
role new
By Brian Schick
Daily Sports Writer

junior Jennifer Smith said.
But, in the Big Ten, victories are hard to come by. Possibly
the most talented conference in the country, the Big Ten cur-
rently boasts three teams ranked in the top 15 nationally, as
well as 10 teams with nine or more wins (an impressive stat
considering all teams have played just 14-17 games).
"On any given day in the Big Ten, you're in for a battle,"
Guevara said. "It doesn't matter who it is or where you are
playing, you've got to come ready to play."
Guevara credits the Wolverines' recent Big Ten turn-
around to being mentally prepared for the competitive
conference.
"This job has a lot more to do with psychology than with
X's and O's," Guevara said. "It's a fresh start for us because
there is still a lot of season to go. You have to go in (to the
Indiana game) 0-0 and forget you're 0-3. It's not about that
right now. We're a different basketball team than we were
two weeks ago, and we still have an opportunity to accom-
plish our goals."
Not only were the Wolverines mentally prepared for the
Hoosiers, but with all scholarship players in uniform for the
first time this season, they were physically ready as well.
"I'm glad to have Niki Reams back, and I'm really glad to
have 12 healthy people," Guevara said.

BIG TEN

STANDINGS
Conference Overall

NBA has lessons to teach
about diversity initiatives

Team W L W L
Penn State 5 1 14 4
Minnesota 4 1 15 1
Ohio State 4 1 13 3
Purdue 3 2 14 3
Illinois 3 2 11 4
Indiana 2 3 9 6
Michigan State 2 3 9 7
Iowa 1 2 9 5
Michigan 1 3 10 5
Wisconsin 1 4 3 12
Northwestern 1 5 6 11
Weekend results:
MICHIGAN 71, Indiana 68
Ohio State 63, NORTHWESTERN 42
WISCONSIN 69, Illinois 59
PENN STATE 75, Michigan State 70
MINNESOTA 90, Purdue 75

For the second straight game, senior
co-captain LeeAnn Bies relinquished
her starting spot to fellow captain Raina
Goodlow Bies, a
preseason All- BASKETBALL
Big Ten selec-
tion, had scored Notebook
just 23 points and
grabbed 10 rebounds through three con-
ference games, and Michigan coach Sue
Guevara was hoping a new starting line-
up would help jumpstart the Wolverines
in the early minutes.
This week in practice, Guevara indi-
cated that she had stressed the impor-
tance of the high-low offense - the
bread and butter of the Wolverines this
season - which had been lacking in
recent games, and she hoped to rein-
force against Indiana Sunday. After a
solid week of practice, Bies returned to
nonconference form, scoring 19 points,
grabbing eight rebounds and going a
perfect 9-for-9 from the line.
"Bies played (Sunday) like she has
been practicing," Guevara said. "We
worked on the high-low all week"
The week of practice helped the team
reestablish its preseason dominance in
the post. This is due in large part to Bies
studying the game from the sidelines.
Although she isn't used to her current
role of coming off the bench, Bies attrib-
HOOSI ERS
Continued from Page 113
Michigan capitalized, draining 20-
of-26 from the free throw line.
Michigan's 20 free throws were three
more than Indiana could attempt, fol-
lowing a trend that has been apparent
in many of Michigan's wins this sea-
son.
"We had not been as aggressive in
the last couple games of getting to the
free throw line," Guevara said. "I like
the fact that we were able to make the
officials make some calls because it
was very physical down there."
Not all those fouls came from
Michigan's size inside. Junior for-
ward Stephanie Gandy got to the
free throw line five times with her
driving ability after Guevara noted
her lack of such activity in last
week's loss to Purdue.
"(Gandy's role) is to give us that
energy and enthusiasim," Guevara
said. "She's doing a better job defen-
sively getting herself going and get-
ting to the boards."
With the normally emotional

DANNY MOLOSHOK/Daily
Michigan center LeeAnn Bies battles for possession with Indiana's Jenny DeMuth
in Sunday's 71-68 win. Bies helped shut down DeMuth, Indiana's leading scorer.

uted her recent success to watching the
game from the sidelines and making the
most of her minutes when she does
come in.
"Coming off the bench gives you a
chance to see what's going on, what the
tempo is, and take in the whole game,"
Bies said. "(It gives the opportunity) to
come in and see what needs to be done
on defense and what we're looking for
on offense. It gives me an advantage."
TURNOVERS? WHAT TURNOVERS?:
Despite winning their first conference
game of the season, the Wolverines
committed 28 turnovers, the second-
highest total of the season. Because
Michigan held on for the win, the
turnovers seemed to take a backseat and
were justified because the Wolverines
were attempting to pound the ball inside.
"I think some of the turnovers came
because we tried to make things hap-
pen before the double team came,"
Guevara said.
Forward Jennifer Smith turned the
ball over six times but said that, despite
the high number of turnovers, they were
Gandy providing her spark, Michigan
got a further boost with the return of
freshman guard Niki Reams. Reams
sat out the Purdue game and had seen
limited action prior to it due to a
wrist injury. While tallying just five
points, she made her presence known
through hustle plays and some defen-
sive prowess, including three steals.
"Niki did give us a big spark off
the bench," Guevara said. "We've
been missing her energy, and she
keeps a lot of balls alive."
Reams' play mirrored much of the
defense the Wolverines exhibited on
the floor. A defense that has been flat
for weeks came to life on Sunday,
exemplified by Michigan's last sec-
ond stand.
Guevara switched between a 1-3-1
zone and a 2-3 zone throughout the
game. While Michigan had its own
troubles giving up the ball, the
defense helped in creating 20
turnovers of its own.
"We were picking it up in the first
half, getting our hands on a lot of
balls," Bies said. "That led to a lot of
easy baskets on the other end."

part of the team working out some of the
kinks from previous games.
"I definitely think we need to cut
down on turnovers, but now with our
first win, everything will probably start
coming together," Smith said.
NEW RINGLEADER: At the beginning of
the season, freshman Rachael Carney
saw very little playing time as fellow
freshmen Mie Burlin and Niki Reams
started and Lauren Andrews was the
third option coming off the bench. Now
Carney has moved into the starting line-
up and has become the dominant floor
leader for the Wolverines.
The role of the point guard is to make
sure that everyone is on the same page.
Smith acknowledges Carney's ability to
assume that role when she's on the floor,
especially at such a young age.
"I think she's done a really nice job
stepping up to be a leader as a point
guard," Smith said. "She always makes
sure we know what defense we're in,
calls out the plays early and gets us
together to make sure we know what
we're doing."

George W. Bush and Colin
Powell can't seem to agree on
the University's admissions
policy. Maybe they should ask NBA
commissioner David Stern for
advice.
Stern and the NBA's team of own-
ers have executed a diversity plan that
the University only wishes it could
duplicate.
Basketball - a game once domi-
nated by white Americans (George
Mikan, Bob Petit, Bob Cousy, etc.)
and later blacks (Michael Jordan,
Magic Johnson, Tracy McGrady, etc.)
- now draws the best talent from all
around the globe.
The Dallas Mavericks have the best
record in the NBA in part because
they were among the first teams to
find good players from Canada
(Steve Nash), Germany (Dirk Now-
itzki), the Caribbean
(Raja Bell) and the Michigan St
Native American guard Marcu
community here in longer good.
the United States a to
(Edward Najera).a par ol
The NBA has basketball a
always wanted to Earth becaL
expand its global reachr
because drawing from raised
a larger pool improves the overall
quality of the players in the league,
and the University has similar goals
for its diversity programs.
The NBA accomplished its goal
quite easily by simply beaming
images of Air Jordan all over the
globe to stimulate interest in the sport
and create a new generation of elite
international basketball players.
Unfortunately, showing tapes of
Ralph Williams' lectures won't
inspire kids across the country to
improve their reading and writing
skills.
The NBA also had the advantage
of rapidly growing development
structures in the areas where "basket-
ball minorities" lived such as China,
Argentina and France. But the
schools that provide the University
with underrepresented minority can-
didates aren't exactly doing the
equivalent of starting their own pro-
fessional leagues.
While the NBA's diversity initiative
was considered a success despite
admitting just a few "minority" play-
ers, the University needs hundreds of
candidates each year before anyone
around here will be happy with the
results.
The goal of the University's admis-
sions policies is not to give immedi-
ate opportunities to undeserving
people, although many people have
argued that is what it accomplishes
right now. Supporters of the policies
believe that they will expand the pool
of talent for higher education in
America to include people of all
races and all backgrounds. In the
long-term, they believe speeding up
the process now will improve life for

at
is
er
,f ti
Iss
us+
th

everyone by creating an environment
like the NBA, where everyone has a
chance to succeed at the highest
level.
But this sort of growth still has
consequences.
Michigan State standout guard
Marcus Taylor is no longer good
enough to be a part of the best bas-
ketball association on Earth because
diversity raised the bar.
People who condemn any assis-
tance or special support for underrep-
resented minorities are turning their
eyes away from real problems facing
minority groups because they are
afraid they will become the next Mar-
cus Taylor.
But those who see no logical limit
to that sort of assistance are just as
blind.
If Stern were to have proposed a
t standoutminimum quota of
three foreign players
Taylor is no per team 10 years ago,
hough to be the players' association
he best would have slammed
e bs the door in his face. A
ociation on system like that would
e diversity do significant harm to
the quality of basket-
re bar. ball being played and
attach a negative stigma to every for-
eign player in the league.
What if Stern paid teams $1 mil-
lion per foreign player up to three per
team? That might speed up the intro-
duction of foreigners into basketball
without doing irreversible harm to the
sport. But what if he wrote a check
for $10 million per player? I think
you would see three foreign-born
players on every roster with a system
like that. And that sort of quota
would not be tolerated, even if it were
to be disguised as an elaborate point
system.
The University has to do a delicate
balancing act. While Michigan has
clearly chosen to err on the side of
too much assistance rather than not
enough, its choices were made with
the best interests of the school in
mind.
I'm just a sports columnist. I don't
claim to have the answer to this com-
plex problem. I don't know if 20
points is a quota in disguise or if it is
completely justified.
Something needs to be done in
order for the University to reach its
long-term goals for underrepresented
minority students in a reasonable
time frame.
But giving too much assistance
will actually hurt its cause by cheap-
ening the education at Michigan and
making some students feel like they
are second-class.
Has the current system crossed a
line? The U.S. Supreme Court will
have to decide that.
Steve Jackson can be reached at
sjjackso@umich.edu.

Thursday's games:
Northwestern at MIcHIGAN
Illinois at OHIO STATE
Iowa at PURDUE
Minnesota at MICHIGAN STATE
Penn State at VILLANOVA
Sunday's games:
Penn State at MICHIGAN
Purdue at NORTHWESTERN
Arizona at WISCONSIN
Iowa at OHIO STATE
Minnesota at ILLINOIS
Michigan State at INDIANA

7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
5 p.m.
12:30 p.m.
1:30 p.m.
2 p.m.
2 p.m.
2 p.m.

'M' STATS

Player
Smith
Pool
Bies
Gandy
Reams
Goodlow
Andrews
Hauser-Price
Burlin
McPhilamy
Carney
Cortis

G
10
15
15
15
13
15
15
14
14
8
13
8

Min
24.2
28.3
25.1
32.1
26.5
15.1
21.1
12.6
16.6
3.3
10.0
3.0

A
1.1
1.9
1.3
1.9
2.1
1.1
1.9
0.9
1.9
0.0
1.1
0.3

Reb
6.4
7.4
5.3
5.2
3.2
3.0
1.9
0.7
2.3
0.6
0.8
0.4

Pts.
13.3
12.8
12.3
12.3
7.9
5.4
4.9
4.1
2.6
1.1
0.5
0.5

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DANNY MOLOSHOK/Daily
Indiana's Lisa Eckart contests the shot
of sophomore Tabitha Pool. Michigan's
aggressive play fouled out two Hoosiers.

U U ' ~1

Ann Arbor -
The University of Michigan
Board for Student
Publications
is recruiting to replace members whose terms
expire in May 2003. The Board is looking at members of
the University Community-faculty, staff & students-who
have experience and expertise in finance, development or
architecture.
The Board is responsible for three publications which
include The Michigan Daily, The Michiganensian

The University of Michigan
Department of Dermatology
is currently offering research
study for facial acne.
If you are over the age of 12 and are in good
general health, you may be eligible to participate
in a research program for facial acne.
Office visits and study agent are provided free of charge to eligible

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