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April 09, 2002 - Image 9

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The Michigan Daily, 2002-04-09

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The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, April 9, 2002 - 9

Mideast and Afghan
conflicts are not gobal

WAR
Continued from Page 1
predicted what would come of its war against
terrorism in 1914."
Regardless of whether the similarities hold
any weight, Morrow said there are many more
differences, including the size of the army
involved, the number and strength of the
nations involved and the number of deaths
expected.
"Normally, the reason why people talk about
World War I and World War II is because tens
of millions of people died," Morrow said. "This
doesn't look like a war in which tens of mil-
lions of people are going to die, even if it has a
world-wide scope."
Additional reasons include the balance of
power between allied and axis armies, political
science Prof. Douglas Lemke said.
"There would have to be some foe on the
other side that was relatively equal to the Unit-
ed States," he said. "If something happened
that tightly unified all those varied factors so
that they acted as if they were one, then you
might get the west versus the rest kind of war.
... But this is not an area that has shown great
coherence in the past."
Though he said he did not fear another world
war, LSA senior Mike Gerard said he believes
the conflicts have many similarities to the wars
fought in the past 50 years.
"It's going to be a world fight against ter-
rorism," said Gerard, who spent last summer
working at the State Department Office of
Chemical, Biological and Missile Non-Prolif-
eration. "The enemy will change, and the
location of the fighting will change, and in
the michigan daily
6 BDRM. APT. between S. University and ********
CCRB. New kitchen, great shape. Call for de- A FI
tails 668-1118. DIFFER

that way, it will be very much like the Cold
War."
Gerard said he believes the threat of terror-
ism is well-known worldwide.
But Gerrard added that he believes terrorists
themselves and the states that sponsor them are
not the only things the world should stand up
against.
Some nations "teach their populations to
honor and respect suicide bombers, and to
honor and respect the causes of many terrorists
groups," he said. "A lot of these states are also
giving cultural support and societal support,
and that is just as dangerous in many ways,
especially when it is directed toward young
children, because that is how suicide bombers
are made."
Even though he said he believes the wars
against terrorism are going to remain sepa-
rate, Gerard said there needs to be unifica-
tion among the countries fighting against
terrorism.
"Terrorists groups - regardless of their
ideologies and their goals - they work
together. When a suicide bombing works,
they copy their technique. They learn from
each other," he said. "That's one reason why
the U.S. should support any war against ter-
rorism."
Despite the significance of historical
events, Porter cautioned against comparing
present day events to conflicts that began and
ended years ago, like World War I and the
Cold War.
"The only clear and unambiguous guidance
history gives us at times like this is the guaran-
tee that we can obtain no clear and unambigu-
ous guidance from history," Porter said.

WEBSITE
Continued from Page 1
including the classifieds and the
calendar, are under review for pos-
sible continuation as stand-alone
applications.
Many upperclassmen, who came
to the University before the intro-
duction of the my.umich pilot, said
they will not be affected because
they, unlike the freshmen, were not
accustomed to the service.
"It's good that they are getting rid
of it. It doesn't solve any problems
that were there before," LSA senior
Ramona Quesada said.
Other students questioned how
much money went into the project.
Actual data and statistics were
not available on how much
my.umich cost the University.
But Hilton said, "Some of the
money will go into public comput-
ing sites to upgrade machines and
furniture."
The my.umich site will be
replaced with a link to the
mail.umich.edu system, which
Hilton said he hopes will be quicker
and more effective than its prede-
cessor.
Some speculations have been made
on whether Sept. 11 may have con-
tributed to the shutdown of the
my.umich site because the project suf-
fered from glitches for almost two
months after the Sept. 11 attacks.
"Nine-eleven made traffic horrible
but that was not one of the reasons that
the my.umich site is being closed down,"
said Linda Place, director of strategic
projects for Information Technology
Central Services.
"Realize that e-mail is not the
only thing being affected. My.umich
is an integrated environment," she
added.

HADDAD
Continued from Page 1.
only breeds suspicion as to why the govern-
ment is proceeding against Haddad and
aliens like him," Edmunds said in a written
statement.
As of last night, Miller said the Justice
Department had not decided whether to
appeal Edmund's decision to the 6th Circuit
Court of Appeals or to seek a stay in tomor-
row's hearing.
Michael Steinberg, legal director of the
Michigan ACLU, said he could not predict
whether the government would seek a stay or
an appeal.
AWARDS
Continued from Page 1
tions were nominated for these awards by
their peers.
But student-staff selection committees do
not make their decisions until winter term.
Students Against Violence Everywhere
received one of six Outstanding Student
Organization awards for "empower(ing) stu-
dents within our community with skills nec-
essary to solve conflicts in a peaceful
manner," according to a written statement
appearing in the event program.
Interim University President B. Joseph
White congratulated award recipients on
behalf of the University community for their
contributions.
White also talked about Sens. Evan Bayh
(D-Ind.) and John McCain (R-Ariz.) who
came to speak in Hill Auditorium yesterday
about increasing community service opportu-
nities around the country.
White said he believes community service
and campus leadership are intertwined.
White added that like the senators, he
appreciates the contributions University stu-
dents have made to their community.
"I have one hope in the future ... that you'll
take your leadership abilities and teach others
to lead as you have done," White said.

But, he expressed doubt that a stay would
be granted.
"In order to grant the stay, the court would
have to find irreparable harm by this hearing
being open," Steinberg said.
But there has been some speculation that
the suits against Haddad and the Global
Relief Foundation are intertwined.
Moss said the two cases involve completely
separate legal issues, and the government has
not yet shown evidence that Haddad has done
anything wrong but violate his visa.
"The government has not introduced any
evidence at all yet that he is anyway associat-
ed with terrorist activities and it would be
presumptuous for us to do so," Moss said.

Vice President for Student Affairs E. Roys-
ter Harper joined White in honoring award
recipients.
"We come here to really celebrate your
accomplishments and leadership," Harper
said.
"Whenever I'm asked to make these types
of comments, I don't know what to say ...
because the students we're honoring today are
so bright," she added.
Other awards given included: Advisor of
the Year, Outstanding New Member, Out-
standing Student Leader, Outstanding Student
Organization, Program of the Year, the Stu-
dent Legacy Award and the Tapestry Award.

AVAIL. MAY - AUG. 10 14 Church. Walk to
Central Campus.ACentral A/C, 3 level apt., 2
bdrm., patio. Idry. room, 2 prkg. spots, unfurn.
$1050/mo. waterimcl. 734-998-0307.
AVAIL. MAY - AUG. Huge bdrm. in house.
710 McKinley. Prkg., furn., Idry. & dwshr.
Contact Barb at badelman@umich.edu or
678-4330.
BEDROOM AVAIL. to share in south cen-
tralA2 starting Fall 2002. Call 913-0359.
BEST LOCATION, SUB. across from Ricks
& next to Pizza House. 4 bdrm., sleeps 5, 2 flrs.
Fully funished,A/C,. Call Lindsey 222-4031.
CENTRALLY LOCATED CHARMING
one bdrm apt with private bath. Corner of N In-
glles/ Kingsley. Avail. sublet for spr/sum & as-
sume for next year. $300/mo for spr/sum,
$525/mo for next year. bstiefel@umich.edu or
734-327-0490.
CHEAP!! MUST SELL summer sublet sev-
eral rooms in large house $250-300/mo. incl.
util., ldry., and prkg. Avail. Immed. E.Univer-
sity and Packard Area call Mike @ 586-871-
4729 for appointment
GREAT APT. GREAT LOC. Furn. 1 bdrm.
Hardwood floors. Near park with tennis courts,
Zingerman's and Mack Pool. Walk to campus.
On busline! Off street prkg. May 1- Aug. 23.
Rent $660.805 Spring St Jessica 214-0545.
GREAT SPR/SUM SUBLET. 6 bdrms. 2
new baths. Large kitchen. 2 bbq's, front and
back porch. 3 prkg. spots. 439 S. Division
Priceneg. Call 834-1233.
LARGE 1 BDRM. A/C. Carpeting, pool, just
off campus. Perfect for I person or couple.
Avail. May-Aug. Call 917-449-5826
MUST SELL!! AVAIL. spr/sum. 1 bdrm in
centrally located apartment right next to Maize
N. Blue Deli on S. University. prkg, Idry., fully
fumished, rent is VERY negotiable. call
216-225-0425 or email awaldman@umich.edu.
SPR./SUM. SUBLET AVAIL. Fully furn.
effic. with A/C, heat, water. 3 min. from cam-
pus. $450/mo. Carlos at 662-8087.
SPR/SMR I or 2 bdrm. in great 3 bdrm. apt. 3
min. from Diag. Pkrg., & ldry., $300/mo. +
utils. 616 S. Division. Call Jon 222-0914.
SPR/SMR SUBLET AVAILABLE 1026
Vaughn. 2 bdrm. apt., near B School. Prkg.
$770 rent neg. Call 327-0796.
sarahls@umich.edu.
SUBLET 1 BDRM. Apt Spr/Surnr., air
conditioning, free parking, laundry, heat, water.
3 min. walk to campus. $625.00 neg.
327-9872. or ka8f@hotmail.com.
SUBLET MAY FIRST to August 25. Light-
filled one-bedroom. Prkg., Idry., A/C & utils.
included. Short walk to Kerrytown or Frieze.
809 Lawrence. $600/mo (neg.).
(734)546-9966 or skybar@umich.edu.

counselo
Must l
BI

*********** ****** ** *** ***** *
UN SUMMER JOB that makes a
RENCE. Work with children as general
ors and waterfront staff, from 6/17-8/18.
ive in Farmington, Bloomfield, Novi,
Birmingham, Troy, or adj. areas.
.ww wiowaydaycamp.com or
Call 248-932-2123.

ATTENTION CAMP COUNSELORS!
Camp Big Silver, a co-ed residential summer
camp, is looking for self-motivated, hard-
working, fun-loving, caring men and women
(18+) to serve as camp counselors. Located
Pickney MI. For more information, visit our
website at http://members.cac.net/campbigsilver
or call (734) 878-6628.
CLERK/MESSENGER $8/HR. 10 hrs/wk.
M-F. Drivers license req. UM central campus.
Call Tammy 764-7312 for interview. EOE.
CO-REC SOFTBALL TEAM seeks female
players. dsa@umich.edu
COMMENCEMENT WAIT STAFF
needed. Work for University catering on April
26th and/orApril 27th. Call 764-2142.
FULL OR PART time English to Mandarin
Chinese translator needed for electronics com-
pany near Metro Airport. Please call Yash @
734-941-8100.
FULL OR PART-TIME RECEPTIONIST
for Progressive Mortgage Co. Located in A2.
Close to campus, great office environment. Job
will include answering phones, and some pro-
cessing of mortgage applications. Must be
friendly, courteous, well-spoken, and willing to
learn. Professional attire req. Please email
resume to:
dschlecte@mortgagesinannarbor.com
or fax to 734-821-0271.
GROUNDS MAINTENANCE STAFF -
Part-time now, full time for Spring/Summer.
Excellent income opportunity. Come to
Varsity Management, 625 Chuch St for
information.
IF YOU HAVE acne you may qualify for an
investigational study at the University of
Michigan Department of Dermatology. You
may be compensated for your participation. If
you are interested in participating then call the
University of Michigan Department of
Dermatology and find out more.
The number is 764-DERM.
INTERVIEW NOW FOR FALL 2002.
Three student assistants needed for The Pier-
pont Commons Art & Programs on N. Cam-
pus to work with Multi-Cultural and Music
events. $7.35/hr, 5-10 hrs/wk. E-mail resume to
marysim@umich.edu or call 647-6838.
LANDSCAPE LABORER We build native
landscapes, creative jobs. $9/hr. 668-7882.
LOCAL COUNTRY CLUB seeking individ-
uals for Pro Shop attendant position. Wage
plus merchandise and golf privileges. Contact
Eric @ POLO FIELDS Golf& CC.
734-998-3456.
MAKE $ FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION:
Art Fair Volunteers needed. Get money for
your club/group and a Free T-Shirt! Join the
2002 Ann Arbor Summer Art Fair July 16-20.
For info. contact Sarah:
sarah@michiganguild.org or at 734-662-3382.
MALE SMOKERS AGE 25-65 who have a
history of depression and are not currently tak-
ing any antidepressants are needed at UM.
Questionnaires, blood withdrawal and smoking
abstinence required. Pays $275 upon comple-
tion. For more information call
1-800-742-2300, #6321, e-mail
PhenoLab@med.umich.edu or visit
http://www.umich.edu/-niclab.
MICHIGAN TELEFUND
Now hiring students for flexible night and
weekend schedules. Fun work atmosphere
and great job experience.
Earn $7/hr plus nightly bonuses.
Apply online or stop by 611 Church, Suite 4F.
www.telefund.umich.edu. 998-7420.
MYSTERY SHOPPERS NEEDED. Get
paid to shop!! $10-15I/hr. with flexible schedul-
ing. No experience necssary. Call Marketing
Concemts at (888) 252-1765.

NOT READY TO LEAVE ANN ARBOR?
Work full time with benefits for a year or two
in a busy and rewarding university office dedi-
cated to quality teaching at the U. Secretarial
and event planning positions available starting
this spring or summer. Call CRLT at
764-0505. U of M is an Equal Opportunity
Employer.
PART TIME WORK as private nurse aid in
my home. Female student to work 5-30 hrs/wk
for spring and summer at $10.50-$12/hr. Car-
ing for my cheerful elderly mother, a stroke
victim. Pleasant, easy work, nice environment.
Prefer nursing student or someone with similar
experience. Apply now. Please write a descrip-
tion of your experience, education, current situ-
ation, work needs, availability and phone #, to
PO Box 130634, Ann Arbor, MI 48113-0634.
REAL LIFE LIVING Services is accepting
applications for direct support staff working
with people with developmental disabilities.
Great experience for students in OT, PT, ST'
Psych, Social Work, Nursing, and Human Ser-
vices. $7.75-$9.00/hr. Applicants must be 18
years of age, possess a valid, unrestricted
drivers license, and have a HS diploma or
GED. 734-222-6076. EOE.
RESEARCH ASSISTANT, Home-School
Teacher positions. Will train.
$28,000/yr. Graduate or SAT 1200. Cham-
pagne, Illinois, income-sharing, family-oriented
community. www.childrenforthefuture.org 1-
800-498-7781.
SHORT TERM LAWN help. 2 people, 6-8
hours each. $10/hr. Call 994-1584.
SINGAPORE SUMMER INTERNSHIPS-
Work for established company. Includes flight,
prime housing. No language experience re-
quired. wwwmanpowercorp.com/goasia.
STONE BRIDGE GOLF CLUB.
Hiring seasonal groundskeepers, pay range
from $7.50-$9/hr. depending on experience.
Golfing privileges for employees.
Please contact Jim Roland @
734-429-8383 for more info.
SUMMER INTERNSH-IPS
Eam $3000-$7000+ and gain valuable experi-
ence working for the UofM Official Campus
Telephone Directory. Excellent advertising
sales, and marketing opportunity.
GREAT RESUME BOOSTER! Call Paul @
Aroundcampus INC 1-800-466-2221 x 288.
www.aroundcampus.com
SUMMER OFFICE HELP needed FT Apr-
Aug answering phones, executing phone or-
ders and data entry. Must be dependable. Fun,
casual atmosphere. Up to $7.75/hr. Please call
Debbie at 677-3400.9-4 M-E
SWIMMING POOL service and
construction. Fast paced outdoor work,
Weekends off Top pay for hard working, self
motivated people to work in the NW
DETROIT SUBS. 248-477-7727.
WAREHOUSE
Local beer distributor seeking part-time people
to fill orders, stock products and perform gen-
eral warehouse duties. Mon-Fri in the after-
noon. Apply in person at 3974 Jackson Road,
Ann Arbor, MI or call (734) 662-4353.
$9.67/hr $10.67 after 90 days.

Camp Greylock & Romaca
seek caring, energetic
counselors and coaches.
Co-ed staffs, competitive salaries
+ room and board. Internships are
available. Located in the Berkshire
Mountains of Massachusetts, 2.5
hours from Boston and NYC.
Archery, Baseball, Basketball,
Climbing Wall, Creative Arts,
Drama, Football, Golf, Gymnastics,
Hiking. Inline-Hockey, Lacrosse,
Mountain Biking, Sailing, Soccer,
Softball, Swimming, Tennis,
Volleyball, Waterskiing, plus nursing
and administrative positions.
Beautiful waterfront campus,
outstanding group of people,
very rewarding summer.
Camp Greylock for Boys:
800-842-5214
www.campgreylock.com

MCCAIN
Continued from Page 1
Aid Director Pam Fowler.
"We can put hundreds of students in
the America Reads program in Detroit,
but they don't have a way to get there,"
she said.
Another aspect of the legislation
would give an $18,000 tuition grant for
serving 18 months of active duty in a
branch of the armed forces followed by
18 months of service in the Reserves.
The bill would also expand volunteer
opportunities for senior citizens.
While McCain and Bayh had
community service on their agenda,
several students at the town hall
meeting wanted answers to their
questions on international affairs
and military pay.
One student asked the senators
what they felt the U.S. role in Iraq
would and should be - the two
agreed that the United States must
take action.
"It's not a question of whether, it's a
question of when," Bayh said. "God for-
bid (Saddam Hussein) get hold of
nuclear weapons. ... It's going to be a lot
harder than Afghanistan."
McCain received a round of applause
for his work on the campaign finance
reform bill that was passed by Congress

and signed by the president earlier this
month.
McCain responded by reminding the
audience of the financial situation with-
in the Beltway.
"There's too much money wash-
ing around Washington that makes
good people do bad things,"
McCain said. "Congress continues
to pork barrel funds while there are
thousands of Americans on food
stamps."
During a press conference, Bayh
acknowledged the detrimental effects
of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict on
American society.
"The longer this conflict goes on, the
more divided not just this campus, but
this country will become," he said. "We
have to send an unequivocal message
that you can't reward terror."
McCain said Israel has a responsibili-
ty to root out terror. He also blamed
non-democratic governments in the
Middle East for not rooting out terror-
ists, characterizing them "as the kind of
leadership that countenances, encour-
ages and rewards people who will take
the lives of innocent people by blowing
themselves up."
The Department of Public Safety
estimated that 1,000 people attended
the forum, DPS spokeswoman Diane
Brown said.

MACKINAC ISLAND'S MURRAY Hotel
needs summer help. No experience necessary.
Desk clerk/rotation workers. $6-$8/hr. Call for
details. Housing available. 1-800-462-2546.
Mon-Fri. 9am-5pm.
PAINTERS AND CREW CHIEFS wanted.
Enjoy your summer working outside. Training
provided, no experience necessary. Earn $8-
$12 per hr. Positions avail. locally and
throughout MI. 1-800-405-6227 or e-mail
plevans2001@ aol.com
SUMMER MONEY, HAVE FUN in the sun
and earn between $3,000-$5,000. Hiring
house painters/foremen. call 888-277-9787 or
visit www.collegepro.com.
SUMMER WORK OPPORTUNITY Select-
ing hardworking, independent students for
sales and business management training. Full
time, great $ and travel. Erica 222-5032.
WORK STUDY OFFICE assistant in hema-
tology/oncology @ medical center. duties in-
clude: prepare documents, spreadsheets and
presentations, perform data entry, set appoint-
ments, make copies, answer phones, deliver
mail, & retrieve research materials from medi-
cal library. Qualifications: knowledge of Mi-
crosoft office (powerpoint, word, excel) and ex-
cellent customer service skills. Prior office ex-
perience helpful. This position requires a spr/-
sum work study award. Contact Susan @
936-5310 or sblaisde@umich.edu.

Asthma
Research
Stud~
Doctors in the area are conducting 2
asthma studies comparing two
marketed medications
o You may be eligible for one or both studies if you are:
- Generally healthy with the diagnosis of asthma
- 18-80 years old
- Use of an albuterol or similar inhaler (Proventil , Ventolin®)
- Not a current smoker or have not smoked more than a
pack a day for more than 10 years
- Available to complete 9-10 visits over 4 months for short-
term study or 15-16 visits over one year for long-term study
o Study-related physical exams, breathing tests, ECG's,
study medication at no charge
o Compensation:

I

r00

BACK AND NECK pain? Try Chiropractic.
Dr. Jayson Epstein, 25 years experience. Relief
phase intro: 4 treatments $75. Near UM.
994-5966.
COLLEGE CLEANERS: PROF. Dry
Cleaning & Ldry. Free summer storage. 715 N.
Univ.Next to HillAuditorium 662-1906.
IMMIGRATION ATTORNEY:experienced,
low rates. Call 302-VISA for free consultation.
MAPLE VILLAGE SELF STORAGE
Grand Opening. Half off first month's rent
2 mi. from campus. Behind Kmart. 662-3700.
SUMMER STORAGE - Indoor, temperature
controlled, clean and safe. Call now for reser-
vation. Inn Storage: 663-0690.
THE WORDWRIGHT DISSERTATIONS,
r a...,r~omroeime cadernA .nninnin,

$250 A NIGHT potential/bartending training
provided. 1-800-293-3985 ext. 607.
FUN JOB FOR STUDENT! Multi-Cultural
Events and Programming Assistant on N.
Campus. 20 hrs/wk, Spring/Summer. Start im-
mediately to help organize film series, music
performances and special events through
Fall/Winter terms. Must be avail. to work part-
time during Fall/Winter terms with average
5/10 hrs/wk. $7.35/hr. E-mail resume to
marysim@umich.edu or call the Pierpont
Commons Arts & Programs at 647-6838.
GRAPHIC DESIGNER NEEDED starting

BE ANYBODY!
Join the experimental group in Black Rock
Desert for a week of the Burning Man festival.
One of 10 Grand prizes you can win for bring-
ing your books to Michigan Book & Supply.
Photos on GotUsed.com

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