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April 01, 2002 - Image 10

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2B - The Michigan Daily - SportsMonday - April 1, 2002

CLUBSPORTSWEEKLY
- Edited by Kareem Copeliand and Jim Weber
Golfers pioneer chances
for women in athletics

Two-step

ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

Who: Bobby Korecky
Hometown: Saline

Sport: Baseball
Year: Senior

By Josh Holman
Daily Sports Writer
They don't look like your average
club team at the University of Michi-
gan. The University Women's Golf
Club (UWGC) isn't composed of the
typical student athletes. In fact, there
aren't any students at all - although
membership is open to them.
This club is composed of a mix of
staff, faculty, alumni and their spouses.
It's composed of-women like Ruth
Spangenberg, 80, who has been a mem-
ber since the club's founding in 1960.
She is still an active golfer and she
walks 18 holes almost every week in
the club's seven month season.
Spangenberg is just one of the many
women who make it out to the Michi-
gan Golf Course for an 8:30 a.m. tee
time each Tuesday, and most of them
have been doing it for quite a while.
The UWGC can trace its roots back
to Barbara Rotvig, a former member of
the physical education department. She
initiated the first meetings that created
UWGC. Initially, it was just an attempt
to introduce more women to the sports
at a time when women's sports still
lacked much of the respect they
deserved.
"This group was ahead of its time in
pioneering the opportunity just for
women to play golf," University Golf
Course manager Charlie Green said.
Sure, they may be pioneers, but the
stereotypes are bound to exist. A group
of aging women who get together once
a week to golf? Some may say that it's
probably just an excuse to drink coffee

and gossip.
Granted, the nine-hole group will
often come in from the course to a cup
of coffee followed by the 18-hole
group, which will usually conclude
their round with lunch together. But
don't think these women can't golf.
UWGC has everything from handi-
cap chairs for both the nine-hole and
18-hole group (Pat Hatch and Spangen-
berger, respectively) to rules chairper-
son Jeannine Galetti.
"It's usually a matter of just keeping
up with the rules that (the USGA) puts
out each year," Galetti said. "None of
them seem to make sense, sometimes."
There is no doubt that each tourna-
ment is competitive, but it's not The
Masters either. The weekly winner at
each tournament receives a golf ball,
and there is a limit to how many you
can win.
Most of the time they are playing for
pride. Many of the women are just
happy to have the chance to play on the
University Golf Course, whose man-
agers have supported the UWGC since
it's founding.
"When they were doing the renova-
tions on this course, our group was
asked to give suggestions," vice presi-
dent Connie Corwin said.
"They still screwed it up," Galetti
said of the course. "Most of the time I
find it much too difficult."
The club is aiming to include more
students in its membership, which
includes around 50 playing members
and 100 contributing members. Tee
times begin at 8:30 a.m. every Tuesday
morning from April through October.

What: The righthanded pitcher allowed no runs in a complete game
shutout of Iowa on Saturday. He struck out three hitters and walked i t''
none in route to the 3-0 victory. He made quick work of the Hawkeyes, ?.
giving up just two hits during a game that took just an hour and 13 min-
utes to complete. The win improved Michigan's ace to 2-2 on the sea-
son. He has a 5.89 ERA this year. Korecky
SPoRT BRIEFS

0
S
0

Herd hoping plane
pieces bring good luck
HUNTINGTON, W.Va. (AP) - Two
Marshall football fans and coach Bob
Pruett want to use pieces of a crashed
airplane that 32 years ago decimated
the university's football program as a
good luck charm.
The two fans, Millard Robertson of
Huntington and Ric Griffith, city coun-
cil president of nearby Kenova, W. Va.
have saved four pieces of the plane that
went down in Huntington on Nov. 14,
1970, killing 75 Marshall football play-
ers, coaches and supporters.
Now they want to encase the fuse-
lage pieces in glass and have them
used in a ritual ceremony at Marshall
home games.
Griffith told WOWK-TV he wants to
establish a tradition where Marshall
players touch the plane pieces as they
enter the field.
He cited similar stadium traditions
where Notre Dame players touch a
"Play Like a Champion Today" sign
and Clemson players touch Howard's
Rock.
Pruett likes the idea.
"I don't think there would be another
event in all of college sports that would
have the emotion or meaning that this
tradition could have," he said. "I think
it's another step toward closure and
another step toward honoring those
great players."
Robertson found the plane pieces
three days after the accident on a hill-
side near the crash site. He saved them

for 12 years, then gave them to his
friend, Griffith, who has kept them
safe since.
"I remember it like it was last
night," Robertson said. "I never
thought it would go this far, but I'm
glad it did."
Kent hits disabled list
with broken wrist

AP PHOTO
The Indians' Ricky Gutierrez completes a double play after forcing the Angels' Garrett
Anderson at second. Cleveland beat Anaheim, 6.0, to open the 2002 baseball season.
Bas lbegins anew
aTribe tops Angels

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - The
San Francisco Giants have decided to
open the season with second baseman
Jeff Kent on the disabled list with a
broken left wrist.
Kent has been playing in Arizona
with the Giants' Triple-A team. On Sat-
urday, he went 3-for-7 with a double,
and played nine innings defensively.
Kent is eligible to be activated April
6. The Giants open their season tomor-
row against the Los Angeles Dodgers.
Kent, a former National League
MVP, told reporters he injured his
wrist while washing his truck. But later
reports said he may have had an acci-
dent while riding his motorcycle near
the Giants' spring home, Scottsdale
Stadium.
Kent played in just two exhibition
games this season.
Looking on the bright side, Giants
manager Dusty Baker said at least the
injury didn't happen late in season's
final stretch, when Kent's health will
be essential.
"If you're going to lose them, you
might as well lose them early," Baker
said.

'M' Norn

Young 'M' hurdlers
star in North Carolina
Track followers throughout the coun-
try have seen freshmen Nathan Brannen
and Alan Webb excel, but have not seen
Michigan's young, outstanding hurdlers.
Though hurdling is not included in
the indoor season, hurdlers train
throughout the indoor season, waiting
for their chance to compete in the out-
door season.
The Wolverines traveled to North
Carolina State for the Raleigh Relays
this past weekend. The hurdlers had
waited long enough, taking advantage
of their chance to shine this weekend.
As the saying goes, "good things are
worth waiting for," and those good
things were performances by young
hurdlers - freshman DarNell Talbert
and sophomore Andrew Ochs. Talbert
placed 16th in the 400-meter hurdles
with a time of 53.20. His time was the
highest individual finish in all the track
events at the meet.
Sophomore 400-meter hurdler
Andrew Ochs earned a time of 53.37,
placing 19th. Ochs thinks even though
track is mostly an individual running
sport, he finds his motivation to keep
pushing from his teammates.
This year, Ochs finds that his team-
mates are his largest motivation when
the season seems long after endless
practices and training.
"My teammates are always pushing
me mentally and physically to do better,"
Ochs said. "Our 400-meter hurdler cap-
tain, Derrick Applewhite is always push-
ing us, motivating us never to slow
down."1
With a strong team aspect in mind
for the outdoor season, Ochs, Talbert
and the rest of the Wolverines hope to
build on their strong performances
from last weekend. The Wolverines
took it easy this past week in the non-
scoring Raleigh meet. They will
return to North Carolina this weekend

to compete in the 15th annual Duke
Invitational at Wallace Wade Stadium
in Durham, N C.
- Jacob Leonhardt
Rowers' win streak
ends against Duke
The Michigan's second varsity eight
experienced something new this week
- struggles.
The boat entered this season with a
11-race winning streak and a NCAA
Championship from 2001. But in Satur-
day's Big Ten/ACC Challenge, the
Wolverines caught a crab early on, but
they fought back to finish with a signif-
icant lead over Duke. The boat would-
n't, however, fare as well in the
afternoon against Virginia.
The winds were picking up in the
afternoon at Belleville Lake, and
Michigan began to take on water early
in the race against Virginia. After 250
meters, the judges stopped the event to
allow the Michigan rowers to return to
the boathouse safely.
Severe wind conditions caused all of
the teams to use a "floating start,"
sometimes starting as far as 100 to 300
meters down the 1,940-meter course.
Overall, the Wolverines won five of
the six varsity races in front of 300 fans
in Van Buren Park.
Michigan's only loss came against
Virginia's first varsity eight in the clos-
est event of the day. Despite running
into some rough water at the begin-
ning of the race, the Wolverines
fought hard, trailing the Cavaliers by
a boatlength for most of the race.
Michigan finished with a great sprint
to post a time of 7:18, but Virginia
edged it out by less than a seat with a
time of 7:17.3
In the morning session, the Wolver-
ines swept the Blue Devils, winning all
three varsity races handily.

ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) - The
new-look Cleveland Indians opened
the 2002 major league baseball season
with the pitching they've been looking
for.
Bartolo Colon pitched a five-hitter
to become the first Cleveland pitcher
in 34 years to throw an Opening-Day
shutout, and the Indians scored four
first-inning runs in a 6-0 victory over
the Anaheim Angels last night.
"We were aggressive and we played
the kind of baseball I hope that we can
play all year long," said Cleveland's
Travis Fryman, who hit the first home
run of the season.
Navy SEAL members parachuted in
to deliver the ball used for the ceremo-
nial first pitch and President Bush
delivered a videotaped message to the
sellout crowd of 42,697.
A day ahead of other major league
teams, Cleveland and Anaheim took
the field to show off their new uni-
forms and the season began at 8:18
p.m. ET - 13 minutes late because of
the ceremony.
Colon was among the many major
leaguers who aged dramatically during
the offseason, when new rules forced
them to supply passports. At first he
said he was 26, then said he was 27
and later admitted he was 28.
After throwing just two complete
games in 30 starts last year, Colon
allowed four singles and a double,
struck out five and walked two. He
needed just 99 pitches to throw the
fifth shutout of his career.
"That's the way I imagined him
pitching," Indians manager Charlie
Manuel said. "He threw all his pitches,
mixed in some breaking balls, threw
his fastballs on both sides of the plate,
was aggressive."
It was the first Opening-Day
shutout in the major leagues since
Dwight Gooden led the New York
Mets over Colorado in 1993 with a
four-hitter. It was Cleveland's first

shutout in an opener since Sonny
Siebert's two-hit, 9-0 win over the
Chicago White Sox in 1968.
The Angels were blanked on Open-
ing Day for the second time in their
42-year history. The other was when
Mel Stottlemyre beat them 1-0 at Yan-
kee Stadium, also in 1968.
Milton Bradley hit a two-run single
in the first off Jarrod Washburn and
Fryman, who slumped to just three
homer last year after hitting 22 the
previous season, had a solo shot in the
third.
"They've been so few and far
between the last year or so, it felt pret-
ty good," Fryman said. "Last year I
had a very difficult year and didn't
swing the bat well at any point."
The Indians have won six of the last
seven AL Central titles but are without
a World Series title since 1948, and
jettisoned much of their hard-hitting
offense - including Roberto Alomar,
Juan Gonzalez and Kenny Lofton -
in favor of pitching and a lower pay-
roll.
Despite the departures, the Indians
had plenty of offense in the opener,
which took just 2 hours, 23 minutes.
Baseball is trying to speed along
games this year, and Colon made it
look easy in the early opener.
Ten other games are scheduled for
Monday, the first full day of action in
the 26-week regular season.
Anaheim, too, is a changed team,
having traded slugger Mo Vaughn and
signed pitcher Aaron Sele in an effort
to win the World Series for the first
time.
Washburn got in trouble immediate-
ly, walking leadoff man Matt Lawton.
The Indians followed with four con-
secutive singles - by Omar Vizquel,
Ellis Burks, Jim Thome and Fryman.
Cleveland's first run scored when
Vizquel singled and right fielder Tim
Salmon threw wildly, allowing Lawton
to come around from first.

'M' CHEDULE
Wednesday, April 3
Baseball vs. Detroit, 3 p.m.
Softball vs. Bowling Green, 3 p.m.
M Tennis vs. Michigan State, 6 p.m.
Thursday. April 4
Ice Hockey vs. Minnesota at Frozen Four (St. Paul, Minn.), 7:30 p.m.
M Gymnastics at NCAA National Qualifier (Norman, Okla.), 2 p.m.
Friday. April 5
Baseball at Minnesota, 7:35 p.m.
Softball at Indiana, 4 p.m.
M Gymnastics at NCAA Team and All-Around Finals (Norman, Okla.), 8p.m.
W Tennis vs. Miami (Fla.), 1:30 p.m.
M Golf at Marshall Invitational
M Track/Field at Duke Invitational
Saturday. April 6
Ice Hockey in Frozen Four (St. Paul, Minn.), 7 p.m.
Baseball at Minnesota (DH), 5:05 p.m.
Softball at Indiana, 4 p.m.
W Gymnastics at NCAA Regional (State College), 6 p.m.
Water Polo vs. Mercyhurst in Southern Division Tournament (Bloomington), 9 a.m.
Water Polo vs. Gannon in Southern Division Tournament (Bloomington), 2
p.m.
Water Polo at Indiana in Southern Division Tournament (Bloomington), 7
p.m.
M Gymnastics at NCAA Individual Finals (Norman, Okla.), 8 p.m.
W ,Tennis vs. Ohio State, 11 a.m.
M Tennis at Penn State, noon
M Golf at Marshall Invitational
W Golf at Indiana Invitational
W Rowing at Michigan State
M Track/Field at Duke Invitational
Sunday, March 31
Baseball at Minnesota, 2:05 p.m.
M Tennis at Ohio State, Noon
W Tennis vs Penn State, 11 a.m.
Water Polo vs. Grove City in Southern Division Tournament (Bloomington),
Noon,
W Golf at Indiana Invitational
DAILYSCXRE 0AIRD

0
9

Agassi wins 700th
match, Nasdaq Open

-from staff reports

NBA STANDINGS

NHL STANDINGS

KEY BISCAYNE, Fla. (AP) - As
a flashy, shaggy-haired teenager,
Andre Agassi became the youngest
men's champion at Key Biscayne.
Twelve years later, bald and busi-
nesslike, he's still the tournament's
best player.
Agassi won the event for a record
fifth time yesterday, beating Roger
Federer 6-3, 6-3, 3-6, 6-4 in the final
of the Nasdaq-100 Open.
The 31-year-old Agassi also was
the champion in 1990, 1995, 1996
and 2001. The only other player to
win five titles was his wife, Steffi
Graf.
"I've just always loved coming
here and playing here over the years,"
Agassi said. "I've had some disap-
pointing weeks here, but there have
been about five special ones I'll
never forget. I love it here. I definite-
ly look forward to coming back next
year."
Agassi also earned his 700th
career victory, a milestone achieved

broke again on championship point
when Federer netted a forehand.
For two sets the 20-year-old Feder-
er looked as if he were playing in his
first Tennis Masters Series final,
which he was. He hadn't lost a set or
his serve coming into the match, but
those streaks didn't last long.
After falling behind 2-0, Agassi
broke Federer three times in the first
set, repeatedly ripping returns that
had the Swiss youngster on his heels
- if he reached them at all. One
forehand by Federer landed in the
sixth row.
Federer, best known for ending
Pete Sampras' 31-match Wimbledon
winning streak last year, rarely
reached the net and struggled early
with an erratic serve and backhand.
But he settled down in the third
set, losing only three points on his
serve. When he took a 4-2 lead in the
fourth set, it looked as though the
match might become a test of stami-
na on the sweltering hardcourt.

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L
New Jersey 47 27
Boston 42 32
Orlando 40 33
Philadelphia 38 34
Washington 34 39
Miami 32 40
New York 27 45
Central Division
W L
Detroit 43 29
Charlotte 38 34
Milwaukee 38 34
Indiana 36 36
Toronto 34 38
Atlanta 29 44
Cleveland 25 48
Chicago 17 56
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
W L
Dallas 51 22
San Antonio 49 23
Minnesota 45 28
Utah 41 32
Houston 26 46
Denver 22 49
Memphis 19 53
Pacific Division
W L
Sacramento 53 19
L.A. Lakers 51 21
Portland 44 29
Seattle 43 31
LA. Clippers 37 37
Phoenix 34 39
Golden State 18 55
Yesterday's games
BOsToN 110, MILWAUKEE 80
SACRAMENTO 92, ATLANTA 91
Indiana 100, Miami 81

Pct
.635
.568
.548
.528
.466
.444
.375
Pct
.597
.528
.528
.500
.472
.397
.342
.233
Pct
.699
.681
.616
.562
.361
.310
.264
Pct
.736
.708
.603
.581
.500
.466
.247

GB
5
6.5
8
12.5
14
19
GB
5
5
7
9
14.5
18.5
26.5
GB
1.5
6
10
24.5
28
31.5
GB
2
9.5
11
17
19.5
35.5

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L
Philadelphia 40 22
N.Y.Islanders 36 27
New Jersey 35 27
N.Y. Rangers 32 36
Pittsburgh 28 34

Northeast Division
W
Boston 41
Toronto 38
Ottawa 37
Montreal 31
Buffalo 31
Southeast Division
W
Carolina' 32
Washington 33
Tampa Bay 25
Florida 21
Atlanta 19

L
22
24
24
29
34
L
24
32
35
42
44

Pts GF GA
92 220,172
83 215 206
83 184 173
72 205 237
68 184 217
Pts GF GA
94 216 181
89 219 190
89 229 193
7 188 195
72 193 187
Pts GF GA
83 200 203
77 211 228
64 158.191
54 163 229
50 173 263
Pts GF GA
112 235 161
91 204 188
86 200 169
65 180 207
53 151 232

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
W L
Detroit 51 14
Chicago 39 23
St. Louis 37 25
Nashville 26 36
Columbus 20 42

Northwest Division
W
Colorado 41
Edmonton 35
Vancouver 37
Calgary 29
Minnesota 25

L
26
26
30
31
32
L
25
24
25
26

Pts
90
85
83
73
68
Pts
89
87
86
81

GF GA
190 158
193 171
230 196
185 201.
177 211
GF GA
224 182
201 188
196 175
198 195

Pacific Division
San Jose
Phoenix
Los Angeles
Dallas

w
39
36
36
33

I

3

11 4

Ahi

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