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March 29, 2002 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2002-03-29

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, March 29, 2002 - 7

Report: IMusers spend 13.6
billion mb utes on~lz)e per year

MESSENGING
Continued from Page 1
out of state.
"It all depends who's online ... There are def-
initely times that when I'm chatting and I
should really be doing schoolwork," he said.
The number of people who use IM at work
rose 34 percent from 10 million in Sept. 2000
to 13.4 million in Sept. 2001, according to the
report. Home instant messaging grew 28 per-
cent from 42 million in Sept. 2000 to 53.8 mil-
lion in Sept. 2001.
Jupiter also reported an increase in IM usage
time, showing a 110 percent increase to 4.9 bil-
lion minutes at work. For users at home, time
spent chatting via IM increased 48 percent to
13.6 billion minutes.
LSA freshman Oliver Olsen said often times
he finds IM to be unnecessary and a nuisance.
"The worst thing about it is that sometimes
people upstairs will IM me, and it's just so stu-
pid because the whole point is to have interac-
tion and it just takes away from everything,"
Olsen said.
"My roommate sent me some random mes-
sages," Olsen added, pointing to the computer
directly behind him. "I really don't know why.
It's really strange."
According to a study of IM users ages 12 to
17 from the Pew Internet and American Life
Project, 57 percent of teens surveyed said they
have blocked online messages, and 64 percent
have refused to respond to someone they were

mad at.
Harvard University psychologist Maressa Hecht
Orzack said that people are attracted to the Internet
for a number of reasons which, in the most serious
cases, may lead to addictive disorders.
"There are three things that seem to cause some
of the attraction - anonymity, affordability and
accessibility," she said. "Other people will find
cyber connections more appealing than real life
ones and may therefore neglect their obligation in
work, school and family."
For Barry, IM has not replaced having face-
to-face conversations with his friends. He said
the lack of personal connection is a major
drawback in using Internet chat rooms.
"It's kind of strange because you could be a
completely different person online," he said.
Twenty-six percent of IM using teens have
pretended to be someone different while chat-
ting, according to the Pew report. Thirty-seven
percent of them have also said they have used
IM to say something that they would not have
said to somebody's face.
Of the 754 teens who participated in the Pew
study, 17 percent have used IM to ask someone out,
while 13 percent have used IM to break up.
Orzack said although she isn't against the
advancement of technology, she wants to stress
that not everything can be done through the
keyboard or by the click of a mouse.
"People need real hugs, not virtual ones ...
virtual sex does not keep up the population."
It is estimated that there are a quarter-billion
IM users world-wide.

STATE HOUSE
Continued from Page 1
Now it equals higher education."
A senior and political science major at Albion College,
Kolb's challenger brings youth to the election with his age
and his agenda.
"It's equally important for young people to jump into the
political arena, and that's one thing that I can offer," Lloyd
said.
Lloyd's platform includes an emphasis on public educa-
tion and an examination of the testing process.
"I'm very uneasy with the fact that (our schools) are con-
.cerned with testing. We have been consumed by the need to
test," he said.
Lloyd also encourages investing rather than spending, a
part of his plan to "battle with the emerging monopolies and
our own private debt," he said.
"The average American household, their debt level is 15
percent of their annual income, and that's gone up more than
six percent in last year," Lloyd added.
DeRossett's advantage as a two-term incumbent allows
him to remind voters of his past record, which speaks for
itself, he said.
"I'm very optimistic about the election at hand," DeRos-
sett said. "I'm very confident I will win the third term and
continue the leadership position in my third term and help
the citizens of Washtenaw county."
As a chair of the Agricultural and Resource Management
Committee, DeRossett outlined his focus as terminating the
property value tax and maintaining road systems.
Burns and Nacht are both attorneys who attended the Uni-
versity for a part of their education. Nacht attended the Uni-
versity Law School, and Burns also attended the University
as an undergraduate with a concentration in Far Eastern
studies. Although each emphasizes education as a main part
of their platform, Burns intends to revamp the state's
approach to pre-kindergarten education, and Nacht involves
his campaign in the University.
"Pre-k education is one thing I would really like to
accomplish," Burns said. "It's key to a lot of our problems.
... One dollar in pre-k education will save seven dollars
down the road in delinquency."
Burns added that Georgia and North Carolina have been
able to provide pre-k education, saving millions of dollars
due to grade repetition.
Nacht approaches the election from the point of view of
his younger days as a student at Harvard University, where
he said he first became interested in politics. He added that
he is determined to have University students at the center of
his campaign.
"I am a strong supporter for funding the public universi-
ties, I could be counted on to continue to fight for funds for
the University of Michigan," Nacht said.
He summarized his platform as a "political philosophy to
enhance individual dignity," which includes topics such as
keeping senior citizens in their homes and enforcing current
environmental laws.
The House elections revolve around a state house map
that was redistricted and renumbered two years ago after the
elections.
As a result, some representatives are changing districts, as
in Rep. DeRossett's switch from holding the 55th-District
seat to running for the 52nd.

ADDICTION
Continued from Page 1
pulled into excessive computer usage,
Orzack said. She added that having a
history of other addictions also makes
people more susceptible to computer
addictions.
"Physically, people can undergo
stresses such as gaining weight from
lack of energy ... have repetitive stress
injuries such as carpal tunnel syn-
drome, migraines from staring at the
screen too much and backaches," she
said. Orzack also noted loss of sleep
and forgetting to eat as warning signs
of addiction.
Logsdon said that even though it has
been more than two years since he
destroyed the disks and kicked the
habit, he has "not totally gotten over it"
and will occasionally play other
games.
Logsdon said for a person showing
signs of addictive behavior, it is critical
to uninstall the program from the com-
puter and also physically destroy the
CDs or disks.
"This demonstrates your power over
the addiction,"he said.
For some, it may not be so easy.
Engineering senior Joe Giannetti
said that "massively multi-player
online role-playing games" such as
HADDAD
Continued from Page 1
the government is alleging," said Nazih
Hassan, vice president of the Muslim
Community Association and friend of
Rabih Haddad.
"I wouldn't call it evidence," he said.
Ashraf Nubani, one of Haddad's
attorneys, said he thought the case
would be appealed no matter what the
judge decides.
"They didn't have anything ... It's

"EverQuest" and "Lineage" are
notorious for keeping players glued
to the screen. Since its release in
1999, EverQuest has amassed more
than 250,000 online players. The
characters, which are designed by
the players, make alliances with
other online players and go on
quests to kill monsters, solving puz-
zles along the way.
"There have been people from
(Bursley Residence Hall) who have
dropped out of school because of
'EverQuest,"' Giannetti said.
Adding that it takes at least six
hours of playing time to make "good
progress" in the game, Giannetti said
he cannot imagine anyone in college
playing the game successfully while
still "maintaining a social life and aca-
demics at the same time."
Logsdon said the need to return to .
his computer stemmed from an "unmet
need" for control in his life. Since quit-
ting, he has realized that, rather than
providing a suitable outlet for these
needs, computer games actually stood
in the way of meeting them.
"The games need to be coded to
force timeouts after too many hours
of play. It's like having bars be
required to stop serving alcohol to a
patron who has had too much,"
Logsdon added.
easy to produce organizational ties,"
Nubani said.
"Just because the area they work in is
not politically correct isn't an indicator
of any wrongdoing," he said, adding that
he thought the organization would be
eventually cleared in court.
Simmons, a lawyer for GRF, said the
U.S. Patriot Act gave the government the
power to seize the organization's assets.
"It's an extremely radical move
against anything this government was
founded on," Simmons said.

bINTERVIEWS
Continued from Page 1
to be aware of reasons other than terrorist-
related activity that could result in the arrest
of an interviewee.
"You should be careful about mentioning an
individual's potential criminal exposure," it
states.
It adds that "The federal responsibility to
enforce the immigration laws ... is an impor-
tant one. Therefore, if you suspect that a par-
ticular individual may be in violation of the
federal immigration laws, you should call the
(Immigration and Naturalization Service)."
Despite the arrests made, Ashcroft said he
believed the interviews have helped form a
stronger relationship between the Muslim
community and the government.
"The first round of interviews generated a
significant number of leads for investigators
the michigan daily

looking into the Sept. 11th attacks and those
who would look into other potential terrorist
activities," Ashcroft said.
"Perhaps more importantly, the process of
reaching out to foreign nationals and their
communities fostered new trust between law
enforcement and these communities."
Hassan said he believes the interviews do
not serve a "law enforcement purpose."
"I don't see how interviewing people from
the same country that terrorists come from
would serve anything," Hassan said.
"I don't know what they assume - that
terrorists share their plans with the common
folk or something? These interviews are cre-
ating a climate of suspicion surrounding
Muslims."
Individuals who receive the letter and need
more information about their rights can visit
the American Civil Liberty Union website at
www.aclu.org.

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GRAPHIC DESIGNER
The University of Michigan, Office of Student
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Please submit resume before April 8 to:
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Student Publications Bdlg., 2nd floor
420 Maynard
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PART TIME WORK as private nurse aid in
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Prefer nursing student or someone with similar
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PART-TIME SUBSTITUTE TEACHERS
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REAL LIFE LIVING Services is accepting

STUDENT EVENTS ASSISTANT of the1
Michigan League Programming. Seeking a fun
job for Fall 2002? Persons will be responsible1
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initiated activities, be creative, self motivated,
reliable, and able to work well with diverse
groups. Must be able to work 10-12 hours/wk.
including occasional evenings and weekends.
Hourly wage $7.75. Apply at the Michigan
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progleague@umich.edu or fax 936-2505.

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Jazz Mass
Sunday evening at 5p.m. Alternative worship
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After sharing an intense service,join us for supper.
No concert on March 30th, next concert on April 6th

SUMMER INTERNSHIPS
Earn $3000-$7000+ and gain valuable experi-
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SWIMMING POOL SERVICE and
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Avg pay $7200. Call 734-678-0915 or email:
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WANTED: STUDENT GRAPHIC
DESIGNER at the Michigan League Pro-
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printed publicity material such as flyers,
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Update and maintenance of League program-
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