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March 21, 2002 - Image 14

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The Michigan Daily, 2002-03-21

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4B - The Michigan Daily - Weekeid Magaziue - Thursday, March 21, 2002

The Michigan Daily - Weeked Magazirn

Denzel is Russell's only
real competition for Oscar

E3

ELITE ENTERTAINMENT EXPOSIT

LYLE HENRETTY --

-- Lt

SPECIAL OSCAR SPECTACULAR EXTRAVAGANZA
THE REAL AWARDS THAT WE WOULD GIVE IF WE RAN THE WORLD, WHICH WL

By Jenny Jeltes
Daily Arts Writer

year-old, all of the Oscar nominees must
first be commended for tackling such
unfamiliar territory.
Tom Wilkinson portrays an emo-
tional father who must deal with the
murder of his son. "In the Bed-
room," directed by Todd Field,
explores the family tension
and painful emotions that one
is faced with after tragically
losing a loved one. Wilkin-
son, as Matt Fowler, bril-
liantly captures the essence
of rage and desire for
revenge by speaking
through his actions
just as much, if
not more
than, his
words.
Although
the most
Courtesy of Universal powerful
"Romper Stomper." scene is

the explosive argument with his wife
Ruth (Best Actress nominee Sissy
Spacek), Wilkinson adds a mysterious
element to his character that makes
him darkly intriguing. It is as if the
audience is just as afraid of Fowler's
decisions as he is. Wilkinson won't
win this year's award for Best Actor,
however, simply because the film's
slow-moving pace produces a low
potential for increased popularity and
recognition.
RusseHl Crowe clearly has no problem
with recognition, especially after winning
last year's Oscar for his role in "Gladia-
tor." The line between the media hype and
an honest assessment of his performance
becomes blurry as the Oscars draw near,
but it is safe to say that Crowe will win
this year's "Best Actor" award. This is
because of his very realistic portrayal of a
schizophrenic and the powerful depiction
of a man struggling to keep both his pas-
sion and his sanity.

Courtesy or Columoia Pictures

All! Bumba yal!
What is it about Crowe that has given
the film so much success? Was it the
curiosity of seeing last year's action hero
tackle something completely domestic
and realistic? Or was it a genuine admira-
tion of his acting talent? These are the
important questions to ask, but regardless
of their answers, Crowe will walk home
with the Oscar.
There has been some controversy
over Crowe's behavior after his
BAFTA acceptance speech, in which
he allegedly assaulted the producer
of the show, whom Crowe blamed for
cutting off his speech. Some specu-
late that this could hurt Crowe's
chances for the Oscar since the Acad-
emy has looked poorly on thug-like

behavior in the past, but Crowe's sub-
sequent apology and the caliber of
his performance should undo the
damage.
There's something so seductively sat-
isfying about seeing Denzel Washing-
ton take on such a sinister role. In
"Training Day," Washington plays
Alonzo, an emotionally conflicted, vio-
lent, undercover street cop who
attempts to manipulate his first-day
trainee and cohort, Jake (Ethan
Hawke). He eventually fails, however,
but the intensity of his character may
just blow you away. He is phenomenal.
Washington's acting performance should
garner him the Oscar, but unfortunately,
See BEST ACTOR, Page 16B

The collective tour-de-force that has
alternately held court on this very
page across the past quarter-century
has finally found a project worthy of break-
ing their anti-collaboration pact. While fans
have often called for a joint "Less Than
Zero" venture, Lyle Henretty and Luke
Smith shunned the idea they felt reeked of
corporate gimmickry. The two, who only
briefly met twice (once before the launch of
the column at a small, undisclosed cottage
- we realize that cottages are not generally
undisclosed, but this one most certainly was,
undisclosed, in Vermont, and once again last
year at Charlie Sheen's wedding), have creat-
ed the most essential, important film award
in the history of creation, not to mention
they have provided the world with the most
important pieces of fiction of the last seven-
ty-three years.
Lyle Henretty was born in Austin, Texas
and came of age in post-war Austria, raised
by a blind aunt and a kindly sheep-herder
named Ansel. He began his literary career
with a Booker prize, and was a Pulitzer
finalist in 1972 for his novel "Hey, Don't Sit
on That!" After his third marriage, his love
for single malt scotch and speedballs finally
got the best of him. After a stint at Betty
Ford, he finally won his Pulitzer for 1983's
novelization of the film "Stop, or My Mom
Will Shoot." He is now happily semi-retired
and living at his ranch in Cambodia.
Luke "Rocky" Smith was born into
obscene wealth as one of the Princes of the
Dykhuis regime in Monaco in the early '40s.
His literary career began with a seven book
series of intrinsic contemplations titled
"Messages from the Mind: Ours and Theirs."

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$10 Rush Tickets on sale 10am - 5 pm
the day of the performance or the Friday
before a weekend event at the UMS Ticket
Office.
50% Rush Tickets on sale beginning
90 minutes before the event at the
Performance Hall Box Office.

STAFF

Jenny Jeltes

Andy Taylor-Fabe

Luke Smith

Jeff Dickerson

Todd Wiese

Twyla Tharp Dance
Twyla Tharp Dance, a new company of six remarkable dan-
cers, debuted last summer at the American Dance Festival
and won instantaneous praise. These performances fea-
ture two different programs which are sure to please fans of
Twyla Tharp's distinctive style and newcomers alike.

WHO WILL WIN:
Rest Plotur LTR A Beautfu Mind A BeautIful Mind A Beautiful MindA B
Best Actor Russell Crowe Denzel Washington Denzel Washington Russell Crowe Denzel Was
Best Actress $lssy Spacek :Issy Spaek $.ssy kisy Spaek $1ssy $pa
Best Supporting Actor Ian McKellen Ben Kingsley Ian McKellen Ben Kingsley Jan McKeil
beS C:o :.Ats Jentr Cinneiy Jnife OnnOly MggieSWt Jennet Cornebl Jennifer
Best Director Ron Howard Ron Howard Ron Howard Ron Howard Ron Howar
Best Picture LOTR LOTR LOTR LOTR In the BedI
Best Actor Denzel Washington Tom Wilkinson Tom Wilkinson Tom Wilkinson Tom WIlkin
Best Actress Sissy Spacek Sissy Spacek Sissy Spacek Sissy Spacek Sissy Spac
Best Supporting Actress Jennifer Connelly Maggie Smith Maggie Smith Maggie Smith . Maggie Sn'
BtDIrectr PeerJ k" Pte acsn aId4 Lynch" DMvdLynch Peter Jeck
IN A PERFECT WORLD:
Best Actor Guy Pearce Gene Hackman Gene Hackman Billy Bob Thornton Tom Wilkin
Best Supporting Actor Steve Buscemi Ian McKeilen Ian McKeilen Gene Hackman Ben Kingsl
Best Director Christopher Nolan Peter Jackson Wes Anderson David Lynch Richard ULi

Brahms' German Requiem
UMS Choral Union
Ann Arbor Symphony Orchestra
Thomas Sheets conductor
Janice Chandler soprano
Stephen Bryant bass-baritone
This special performance will be held on Good Friday
with a delayed start time of 8:30.
,,j ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0A E MR 1 'A7 M TCE FFC OAT 1ED IEMIEAGUE,
urns cO'764.2538 HOURSM- A S AGUE,
A valid student ID is required. Limit two tickets per student, per event. Rush Tickets are not
socl offered if an event is sold out. Seating is subject to availability and box office discretion.

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