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March 08, 2002 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 2002-03-08

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'Roman Holiday'
Audrey Hepbum's break-
through film with Gregory
Peck plays at Lorch Hall at 8
p.m. Free.
michigandaily.com/arts

Mxd#mJSf

FRIDAY
MARCH 8, 2002

5

Dennehy neatly fills
Knight's red sweater

Domestic Problems
to enliven Blind
Pig with zany lyrics

By Jeff Dickerson
Daily Arts Editor
"I guess that people are attracted, or whatever, to
a no bullshit guy who tells people to shove it up their
ass when he thinks it's appropriate." - Bobby Knight,
March 1988
Love him or hate him, Robert Montgomery
Knight is one of the most successful coaches in the
history of college basketball. Some
call him "The General," others view a
the white haired coach as a god, and
many consider the man nothing morew 9
than a chair-throwing-player-choking
maniac. As the coach at Indana Uni- SEAS OPa
versity from 1971-2000, Knight won Bi
three national championships, coached
the last undefeated team in NCAA Sunday
Division I history (1976 Hoosiers with FS

small screen this Sunday
night amid heavy promo-
tions and the onset of the
NCAA Tournament.
Unlike most of ESPN's
coverage of Knight (now
at Texas Tech), he is por-
trayed in a positive fash-
ion, as scenes highlight
his humorous personality
and his
genuine
a ffe c t ion
for his
players and
ON THE their suc-
NK cess, both
on the bas-
t8 p.m. ketball
N court andin

By Stacy Anderson
Daily Arts Writer
"Domestic Problems" isn't usually
the sort of name you would attribute to
an upbeat and energetic band, but their

Pieces and Play, won the band scores of
fans not only in Western Michigan, but
across the country. With the release of
their new album Patiently in April of
2001, Domestic Problems have proved
once again that people love their ener-

44
RP
yat
SPZ

emotional lyrics and zany
stage performance is any-
thing but problematic.
Six guys from Grand
Rapids on instruments
like the saxophone, man-
dolin, and percussion
prove that in eight years a
group of college kids can
grow into a band that

DOMESTIC
PROBLEMS
Blind Pig
Tomorrow at 9:30 p.m.
$8-$10

getic and emotional style
of music. "We try and
spark a lot of energy and
give back twice as much
as we're given," com-
mented Grotsky. Consid-
ering what they get from
their fans are multiple
dates on the H.O.R.D.E.
Festival in 1997 and sold

t

Quinn Buckner) and attained the kind
of media coverage most celebrities
salivate for.
For the 1985-86 season (a year before winning
another national title), coach Knight gave sports-
writer John Feinstein unprecedented access to his
team, from watching practice to attending staff meet-
ings. After a tumultuous year observing every
minute detail of the basketball operation, Feinstein
culminated his experiences into what would become
the best-selling sports books of all-time, "A Season
on the Brink." The in-depth look into one of college
basketball's premier programs revealed the militaris-
tic nature of Knight behind the scenes and further
fueled the growing legend of the coach. Critics and
readers praised Feinstein's work, while Knight
referred to the author as "a turd."
In its first made-for-television movie, ESPN
brings Feinstein's "A Season on the Brink" to the

the class Do you like gladiator movie
room.
Hollywood veteran Brian Dennehy ("Cocoon,"
"F/X") stars as coach Knight in one of his most
demanding roles. Dennehy is the perfect choice to
adorn the famous red sweater, matching the physical
and verbal appearance of the fiery coach. Dennehy is
able to showcase the profanity proficient coach and
loving family man simultaneously.
Supporting Emmy-Tony-Golden Globe winner
Dennehy are a handful of newcomers. James Laffer-
ty ("Emeril") plays Indiana hot shot Steve Alford
adequately, at times showing his lack of acting expe-
rience. Delray Brooks, a talented athlete who left
Indiana after Knight's criticism, is played by Al
Thompson ("The Royal Tenenbaums") in a strong
performance. Other notables include Michael James
Johnson as Daryl Thomas, Duane Murray as Kohn
Smith and Patrick Williams in his debut as Stew

Courtesy of ESPN
es, Billy? Have you ever been in a Turkish prison?
Robinson.
The superb acting of Dennehy helps shift the
attention away from the inept filmmaking of director
Robert Mandel ("Hysteria: The Def Leppard Story,"
"The Substitute"). Camera movements are erratic
and unorthodox, in the all-too-overused MTV style.
Within "A Season on the Brink," actual game
footage from the 1985-86 season is inserted, but is
visually inconsistent with the staged games, giving
the TV movie an unprofessional appearance. Editing
resembles a frantic Linkin Park video, in a pitiable
attempt to be trendy.
"A Season on the Brink" is a well-acted poorly-
made character driven adaptation of the best-selling
book. The strength of Dennehy's performance lifts
the TV movie from mediocrity and could earn him
another Emmy.

tours and performs with the likes of the
Barenaked Ladies and the Dave
Matthews Band, yet manages to keep a
unique and flavorful sound that they can
call their own.
An interesting mix of instruments is
what sets Domestic Problems apart from
other star-struck wannabes. "We have a
versatility of instruments," commented
Job Grotsky. "We're not just a guitar-
based band." He should know, consider-
ing he includes not only the saxophone
but the tin whistle and percussion in his
personal instrument list as well. Their
band member and instrument list is a
long one, but equally impressive. Andy
Holtgreive plays guitar and sings lead
vocals, Billy Kenny plays the trumpet,
mandolin, trombone and flugelhorn
(think of a bugle or a cornet), Earl Tol-
liver Jr. plays bass, Jamie Black plays
the piano, organ and sings backup
vocals and Reggie Ness plays the drums
and percussion. Definitely not guitar-
based, which is what makes this band
one to pay attention to.
Their first two albums, Scattered

out shows of over 1,500 fans every year
since then, they have a lot to give at each
show. Domestic Problems definitely
delivers.
At every show, fans love hits like
"Beautiful Girl," a song written for
singer Holtgrieve's wife, and "Summer
in the Sandbox," about a kindergarten
love. "We try and keep (the setlist)
fresh," said Grotsky "We like to group
songs instrument-wise and keep the
show flowing smoothly." And smooth it
is, managing to make the audience to
dance, laugh, and sing along all at the
right moments. "I think the crowd sees
the genuine fun that we have (on stage),"
Grotsky explained. "We can't help but
jump around and dance like idiots, so be
prepared to have a great time." If noth-
ing else, a Domestic Problems show is
an experience unmatched by any band
in recent history. They combine talent, a
variety of instruments, and a rowdy
stage performance to kick ass in a soft-
core but highly desirable way, keeping
their shows sold out and their albums
top-sellers with new and old fans alike.

Fine cast can't overcome flawed 'Stepsister'

By Ryan Blay
Daily TV/New Media Editor
An "ugly" stepsister, a portrait
painter upset that he painted a master-
piece and a failed investment in
tulips. These and other convoluted
plot points form the crux of ABC's
rehash of the Cinderella tale, "Con-
fessions of an Ugly Stepsister."
In the 17th century, "Ugly"Tifis

(Aruza Skye, "Bandits"), quiet Ruth
(Emma Poole) and their scheming
mother, Margarethe (Stockard Chan-
ning, "The West Wing") used to be
rich. Then they were driven away
from their home. This leads them to
Holland, at the center of its commer-
cial importance.
A quirky painter called The Master
(Jonathan Pryce, far too respectable to
be in a show like this) takes in the

family. Iris sits for one of the Master's

romance between Iris and the
painter's apprentice is under-devel-

portraits; this leads to an
to paint the beautiful yet
agoraphobic Clara.
Iris, of course, must
find a way to bring the
moody Clara (Jenna
Harrison) out of her
shell. Meanwhile, she
must also discover her
own inner talent. This is
all woven in with the
Cinderella theme, so
you can probably guess

opportunity

**

CONFESSIONS OF
AN UGLY
STEPSISTER
Sunday at 7 p.m.
ABC

oped. But the biggest
glaring error is that Iris
is not ugly! Skye may
not be the world's most
beautiful actress, but
she holds her own with
Harrison, and has a far
better part (if not as
good a British accent).
As for the tulips, this
actually occurred in the
17th century, but seems

U.

what happens (hint: It involves a rat
that turns into slippers, a fairy fortune
teller, and a prince).
The story is certainly charming
enough. ABC made sure of that.
Some of the dialogue is even funny at
times (sample: "It's worse to spy on
someone who's spying on someone's
door"). But the plot holes deprive the
viewer of what should be a charming,
if not technically original, story.
Ruth is amusing, but has hardly any
5 place in the story save comic relief.
The Master develops depression after
Courtesy of ABC realizing he can never surpass the
Man, are these girls ugly. quality of his portrait of Clara. The
'Artificial Intelligence' DVD is
better than poor film deserves

odd for a Cinderella story.
Channing is well cast as Mar-
garethe, who schemes and uses
potions in the name of keeping her
family fed - and rich. Ruth may be
the finest character, although again
her role is squelched.
Although beautiful filmed in
Luxembourg, and well cast, "The
Wonderful World of Disney" made
a mistake in commissioning this
tale. After half an hour, it develops
into a train wreck - disastrous,
fun to watch yet eventually some-
thing you wish you didn't spend so
much time on.
ARE YOU
BILINGUAL?
COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE LAB AT
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN IS
LOOKING FOR PEOPLE WHO SPEAK
MORE THAN 1 LANGUAGE, HAVE NO
HISTORY OF HEAD INJURY,
NEUROLOGICAL DISEASE, OR
CLAUSTROPHOBIA (FEAR OF
ENCLOSED SPACES), AND HAVE NO
HISTORY OF READING OR LEARNING
DISABILITIES TO PARTICIPATE IN
STUDIES. PAYS $8-$15/HOUR
DEPENDING ON STUDY, PLUS YOU
MAY RECEIVE A PICTURE OF YOUR
BRAIN. CALL 763-0343 FOR MORE
INFORMATION.

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Grand Opening
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10:OOPM - 2:OOAM Every Day

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By Lyle Henretty
Daily Arts Editor
Steven Spielberg's next job could
easily be a CGI enhanced vision of
Stanley Kubrick spinning in his grave.

ter as an earlier model "mecha," one
that allows lonely women to induldge
in the safest sex imaginable. The two
team up after David is chased out of
his home and Law's prostitute is
accused of murder.

The notoriously warm
and fuzzy "Duel" direc-
tor worked with the late
auteur on A.I. on and off
for years, but wrote the
script (based on Brian
Aldiss' "Super Toys Last
All Summer Long) by
himself after Kubrick's
death. The result is a
half-realized film,
entirely competent in

A.I. ARTIFICIAL
INTELLIGENCE
DVD
Picture/Sound: ****
Movie: **
Features: ***i

Their odyssey takes
them from the Flesh
Fair, a place where
humans destroy mechas
for sport, to an under-
water New York City
still sporting the tops of
the World Trade Center.
Their most disappoint-
ing excursion leads
them to Rouge City in

the movie. He has a thoughtful, wise
voice and his expressions and move-
ments are truely amazing. Add to
that storyboards, trailers, drawings
and more photos than you can shake
a stick at, and fans of the movie have
plenty to salivate over. The rest of us
must remain content imagining how
good the movie could have been if
the high priest of irong, Father
Kubrick, could have hung on just a
few more years.

LOOKING FOR GREAT
INTERN HOUSING THIS
SUMMER IN NEW YORK CITY.

execution

(except for, quite possibly, the most
offensively bad ending ever to grace
celluloid) yet lacking the true magic
necessary to pull of such a film.
Haley Joel Osment is nearly flaw-
less as David, a prototype robot that
can actually feel love for its "parents."
Osment does not blink once in the
entire run of the film, and his per-
formance demands both compassion
and dissonance. Jude Law is even bet-

search of the Blue Fairy (don't ask,
Pinocchio runs rampant). For Rouge
City, Spielberg simply copies Ridley
Scott's "Blade Runner" without any
of Scott's subtle touch.
If the film didn't matter, though,
the new Dreamworks DVD would be
a fine package. The double disc set
has a beautiful transfer of the film,
showing off the deep colors and glori-
ous special effects. Spielberg's talent
lies in the visual, and DVD is the per-
fect format (off of the big screen, any-
way) to showcase his talent.
The first disc includes a standard
(but not uninteresting) documentary
on the making of the film, rife with

- ~~inLM ~ EU N~

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