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March 07, 2002 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2002-03-07

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10 A - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, March 7, 2002

ARTs
THE BEAT GOES ON: 21-30

BEST BANDS
Continued from Page 9A
21. NWA - The world's most
dangerous group came straight
outta Compton and straight into the
hearts and minds of millions of
Americans sick of the bubblegum
rap of the Fat Boys and their ilk. Ice
Cube, Dr. Dre, Yella, MC Ren and
drug-dealer turned producer turned
rapper Easy E created gangsta rap
by rhyming their life stories and
ghetto-fantasies of shooting 8 balls,
slapping bitches and fucking the
police. The FBI turned out to be the
better than any ad agency, selling
millions of NWA units by coming
out against the bands quiet protesta-
tion of the LAPD.
22. Black Sabbath - Despite
the nonsensical cover featuring a
blurred warrior with a plastic shield
and sword, Black Sab-
bath's second
album Paranoid is
the definition of

heavy metal masterpiece. Tony
Iommi's skilled guitar and Ozzy
Osbourne's eerie vocals resulted in
the darkest rock music of the early
70s. The group produced several
classic albums and songs, but their
legendary single "Iron Man" is per-
haps the most well known guitar riff
in rock history.
23. The Talking Heads -
Long before it was cool to be geeky
or to incorporate African rhythms
into stripped down pop rock, David
Byrne headed this group of art
school punks from 1977 to 1988.
Most people think of Byrne in the
big white suit from the concert film
"Stop Making Sense," but Byrne's
and the Heads' influence goes
beyond their contemporaries, reach-
ing into the '80s and '90s. Music
isn't always
an art-
form, but
for The
Talking
Heads, it

Radiohead - Sans Pablo Honey,
the Oxford quintet has a library of
albums stronger than any current
group in music today. While Radio-
head has continued to release
impressive albums, their best work
in the last year has been guest star-
ring on South Park in the lauded
episode "Scott Tenorman Must
Die." Fun Radiohead fact: Their
single "Paranoid Android" from
1997's Grammy-winner OK Com-
puter, with its three songs for the
price of one format, is based on The
Beatles' "Happiness is a Warm
Gun."
25. The Clash - Forget the
anarchism of The Sex Pistols and
the "save the world" malarkey of
U2; The Clashwere left-wing, pas-
sionate rockers who infused their
punk with reggae and dub, and
although their U.S. success was
fleeting, the finely crafted songs of
Mick Jones and Joe Strummer,
especially on their '77 self-titled
debut and '79's London Calling,
have given them deity status both
here and abroad.
26. Elvis Costello and The
Attractions - Remember what
we said about discretion and know-
ing when to stop the rock? Case in
point: Elvis Costello and The
Attractions were never stellar, but
what they lacked musically they
made up for in youthful attitude
and delinquent angst. Witness the
snarling Costello spitting out the
words to "Radio, Radio" on Satur-
day Night Live in 1977 against his
record company's wishes the
song is good, the pos-
g"eat" Im
only it was
E lv i s
who did-
n't know
Courtesy of Geffen
Slash back before Axl got fat.

*I

#

Courtesy of Matador

Summer babes Pavement.

quit.

RISD punks glare like psycho killers. That's a song, kids.

Celebrate APA heritage month and resurface this often ignored part of APA history
WHAT WERE
k THESE SOLDIERS
WAITING IN LINE FOR?
SEXUAL SLAVERY

a 9

Beginning in 193i or 13 ana continuing tnrougnout tne aurauon of mne
Asian/Pacific wars, the Japanese Government instituted a system of sexual
slavery throughout the territories it occupied. During that time, women were
recruited by force, coercion, or deception into sexual slavery for the Japanese
military. These women were euphemistically referred to as "comfort women"
by the Japanese Imperial Army.
More information on our website: www.umich.edu/-ksa
Contact: Ksaoff@umich.edu

ROB BRODE, JEFF DICKERSON, KEITH
DUSENBERRY, LYLE HENRETTY, DUSTIN SE1B-
ERT, LUKE SMITH, NICK WOOMER

0
0

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