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March 05, 2002 - Image 3

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LOCAL/STATE

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, March 5, 2002 - 3

CRIME

Students question impact of GEO strike

Pair found with
alcohol sleeping on
Stockwell couch

By Maria Sprow
Daily Staff Reporter

Between negotiating the terms of their 2002-
Two people were arrested for 2005 contract with the University and teaching
minor in possession of alcohol classes, members of the Graduate.
offenses in Stockwell Residence Employees Organization have been <
Hall Wednesday morning, according working hard. But GEO members
to Department of Public Safety said they are also working on com-
reports. The people were found bating another major hurdle: gar-1
sleeping on a couch in the lounge. nering the support of undergraduate ;.,
students.
* Victim suffers from In order to gain support and give undergraduatesl
bloody nose after an understanding of their issues, some GSIs havel
used class time to discuss the status and impor-I
two cars collide tance of the GEO negotiations. Others are plan to
bring in members of Students Organizing for
Two vehicles collided Wednesday Labor and Economic Equality to talk about the c
morning and one person received a importance of unions and bargaining at the Uni-f
bloody nose, DPS reports state. versity.
Huron Valley Ambulance and Fire GEO member and Rackham student L'heureuxr
Rescue were called to assist the vic- Lewis said the understanding and support of grad-c
tim with the bloody nose. The vic-
tim was treated, but declined
transport to the hospital. Rock on

uate student issues from undergraduate students is
crucial both during and after negotiations.
"The undergraduate voice is one of the most
powerful voices at the University," Lewis said,
adding that he believes the concerns currently
holding up the negotiations will, in one way or
another, benefit the student body.
"If they decide to go to graduate school, under-
graduates will likely be GSIs," he said. "I think
that what affects GSIs positively will affect under-
graduates positively."
But with the threat of a planned walk-out on
Monday and possible strike and canceled classes
looming over the next couple weeks, some under-
graduate students said the GEO is difficult to sup-
port. Though LSA sophomore Jill Vantongeren
said she might be excited if a class or two were
canceled, she said she did not feel calling off class-
es would be beneficial to undergraduate students.
"I would feel cheated," Vantongeren said. "I
don't see how it is fair for them to walk out on
classes like that. It's their responsibility (to teach)."

Other students said they felt a walk-out or
extended strike would compromise the quality of
education received at the University.
"I would be upset because, to me, they have the
kind of job where they can't just walk out," LSA
sophomore Joann Levi said. "It's not just them
they are affecting, they are affecting students, and
it's not the student's fault."
The University administration has expressed
their concern about what a work stoppage by the
GEO would do to undergraduates.
"A work stoppage of any length would be
extremely disruptive to our educational effort, and
would seriously shortchange our undergraduate
students," interim Provost Paul Courant said in a
written statement. "I do not believe a work stop-
page is appropriate, nor do I believe that a work
stoppage will be necessary in order for GEO to
arrive at a fair contract with the University."
But GEO Chief Negotiator Alyssa Picard said if
a work-stoppage took place, undergraduates
should support the issues driving them.

"We want our students to understand that the
work-action we are about to take is not person-
al," she said, adding that other union workers
- such as construction workers building the
Life Science Institute - will most likely not
cross a GEO picket line, causing the project to
take longer and the University to spend more
money.
"A walk-out costs the University a lot of
money ... we have reason to believe a walk-out
would put tremendous (financial) pressure on
the University."
Picard said she believes the lesson students
could learn by participating in the walk-out is
more valuable than the lessons students would
learn by attending class.
"Much more important to me than what I teach
my students in class is what I show them by how I
behave in my life," she said. "If I see something
that I know is wrong and I don't stand up to it, I
am teaching my students then, too, but not what I
want to be teaching."

Woman discovered
lying on floor of
research building
It was reported that a woman was
lying on the ground of the Medical Sci-
ence Research Building Wednesday for
unknown reasons, DPS reports state.
* Huron Valley Ambulance responded
and discovered that the woman was not
injured. She refused transport to the
hospital.
Washer, cart stolen
from storage room
It was reported Sunday night that
a yellow Kracher high pressure
washer with a black wheeled cart
and green garden hose was stolen
from a storage room in Bursley
Residence Hall, according to DPS
reports.
Smoke scent leads
to burnt napkin
DPS officers smelled smoke
while in Bursley Residence Hall
and found a burnt napkin in a trash
can Sunday night, DPS reports
state. The napkin was not on fire
when discovered.
The officers checked for people
in the area, but did not locate any-
one. No property was damaged in
the incident.
Shoplifter caught
in gift shop of
0 University Hospital
A person was arrested for stealing
clothing items from the gift shop of the
University Hospital Saturday after-
noon, according to DPS reports. The
person was processed and released
pending the issuing of a warrant.
Cookies, gift
certificates stolen
from library desk
An unknown person stole several
items from Shapiro Undergraduate
Library, according to DPS reports. Two
boxes of Girl Scout cookies were
stolen from an unlocked cabinet and
three gift certificates valued at $15
each were stolen from a desk.
The thefts happened in the Sci-
ence Library Sorting Room.
Parents dispute
over staying with
their injured child
A civil dispute occurred in the Uni-
versity Hospital early Wednesday,
according to DPS reports. Two people
were arguing about who was going to
stay in the hospital with their injured
child.
Historic plaque,
sign missing from
Kelsey Museum
It was reported Friday morning
that a historical plaque and plexi-
glass sign were taken from the front
of the Kelsey Museum of Archeolo-
gy on State Street, DPS reports
state.
- Compiled by Daily Staff Reporter
Jeremy Berkowitz.

Prisoner art show to open
today at the Media Union

By Jeremy Berkowitz
Daily Staff Reporter
For the next 13 days, University
students will be given a chance to
see art from an unusual perspective.
The Seventh Annual Exhibition
of Art by Michigan Prisoners opens
today at the Media Union on North
Campus.
"The arts are a final part of any-
one's experience," RC Prof. Ann
Savageau said.
The exhibition began in 1996
through the efforts of English Prof.
William Alexander and art Prof.
Janie Paul.
It originally featured the work of
prisoners incarcerated in the Ann
Arbor area.
Over last six years, it has spread
to include works of detainees from
36 correctional facilities across
Michigan, including the Marquette
Correctional Facility and the West-
ern Wayne Correctional Facility.
Alexander said he sends applica-
tions for submission every year to for-
mer participants as well as directors of

"The arts are a final part of anyone 's
experience.
- Ann Savageau
RC professor

prisons to encourage new people to
enter. This year, 155 of the 190 pieces
submitted will be featured.
Alexander said the talent level of
the participants varies each year.
"A few had art experience," he
said. "Others grabbed a No. 2 pen-
cil and started drawing." He added
that the subjects of the pieces are
very wide and may surprise some
observers.
"People come into this expecting to
see some grim scenes ... they see a lot
of portraits and landscapes," he said.
In conjunction with the art show,
New York artist Alison Cornyn will
install the Sand Counting Lab in the
Natural Science Building greenhouse.
People are allowed to sign up for
10 minute sessions to enter the

exhibit, count grains of sand and
meditate about the two million pris-
oners currently incarcerated in the
United States.
Cornyn has installed this exhibit in
several locations over the last four years.
In order to participate, people can e-mail
rmessing@umich.edu, or stop by the
exhibit in person during the week.
"It's really to get a sense of the
people who make up statistics,"
Cornyn said.
Alexander, who has worked in
Michigan prisons for 12 years, recog-
nizes the importance of paying atten-
tion to those who are incarcerated.
"We have two million prisoners in
the United States ... most of them are
poor," he said. "There are not a lot of
creative spaces in prisons."

JONATHON TRIEST/Daily
Alex Awn rocks his guitar last night at Mr. Mugg's Showspace in Ypsilanti
with his band, Coalition.
Michigan's forestss
slowly depleting
fro-m exotic diseases

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HOUGHTON (AP) - Michigan's
20 million acres of forest face a rising
threat from exotic pests and diseases,
thanks to the growing volume of world
trade, experts say.
"We move a lot of commodities
around that may carry pests. We really
don't-know what the long-term impli-
cations of all this trade are on our
ecosystems," said Frank Sapio, forest
health program leader for the state
Department of Natural Resources' For-
est Management Division.
Forests cover 53 percent of the
state and are an important commod-
ity for the environment, recreation
and tourism.
So far, Sapio says, Michigan's
forests are "quite healthy." State, local
and federal agencies are working
together to keep out new pests and dis-
eases, and to react quickly to stop
those that sneak in, he told the Detroit
Free Press yesterday.
One potential problem generating
concern in Michigan is sudden oak
death syndrome.
The harmful fungus that causes this
has been found in 10 counties in Cali-
fornia, where it may be affecting red-
woods, and one in Oregon, where it
has killed thousands of oaks and other
trees since 1995. Some say the fungus
entered this country on rhododendrons.
Last month, the U.S. Department of
Agriculture put in place an emergency
temporary quarantine that bans ship-
ments of nursery stock and infected
wood from those areas, and Canada
has also moved to keep the fungus out.
Whether the pathogen that causes it
could survive in Michigan is unknown,

but laboratory tests show that red oaks
are susceptible, said Andrew Storer,
assistant professor of forestry and
wood products at Michigan Technolog-
ical University in Houghton.
Storer said he worries that the fun-
gus could enter nursery stock then
spread to native trees.
Those fighting such invaders use a
wide range of weapons, including
satellite imaging, airplane reconnais-
sance flights and high-tech mapping
devices.
Increasing foreign trade, however,
has researchers bracing for a new
onslaught.
Trade partner China's latitude and
climate are similar to those found in
parts of North America.
That means there are likely to be "a
whole lot of species of insects and dis-
eases that have potential to establish
here," said Deborah McCullough,
associate professor of entomology at
Michigan State University.
Some already have arrived. Asian
long-horned beetles, a China native
suspected of hitching a ride inside the
wooden packing material of ship
cargo, turned up in New York state in
1996 and in Chicago in 1998. So far,
5,700 trees have been lost.
Sapio works with two other DNR
forest-health employees to inventory
Michigan's trees and woods, which
include 4 million acres of state for-
est. from May through September,
team embers make frequent flights
throughout the state, looking for
defoliation, wind damage, discol-
oration and other signs of trees in
trouble.

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THE CALENDAR

What's happening in Ann Arbor today

EVENTS
"Finding Justice for East
Timor"; Sponsored by
the ('nter for nSotheat

ology, talk by Dr. Harry
McLaughlin, 7:00 p.m.,
Shgrangpani Lounge,
Mary Markley Hall
Open House reception;

ciation, 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.,
Michigan Union Pendle-
ton Room
"Innocence and Blame:
False Dichotomies and

SERVICES
Campus Information
Centers, 764-INFO,
info@umich.edu, or
www. umich.edu/~info
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