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February 14, 2002 - Image 12

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The Michigan Daily, 2002-02-14

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12A - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, February 14, 2002

0

Blue trying to end
road woes in Iowa

Netters will be tested by SEC

By Chaues Paradis
Daily Sports Writer
With just four games left and practi-
cally no shot of reaching the NCAA
Tournament, some might say the sea-
son is over for the Michigan women's
basketball team. But coach Sue Gue-
vara is not one of those naysayers, and
she will not let her players feel that way
either.
As the situation stands, Michigan has
room to get better, and it is the drive for
self improvement that Guevara hopes
to grab hold of tonight.
One area the Wolverines can
improve in is their play away from
Crisler Arena. While Michigan owns a
4-1 conference record at home, the
Wolverines have not been able to win a
Big Ten road game on the road in seven
attempts this season. If Michigan wants
to snap this road skid, it will need all of
its players to play well together, a feat
the Wolverines have not been able to
accomplish all season.
"We've had a player come up every
game with big numbers;' Guevara said.
"It will be really nice when (LeeAnn)
Bies, (Jennifer) Smith, (Stephanie)
Gandy and (Alayne) Ingram all can
come in on the same page and put
some numbers up."
Last time out it was Gandy who led
the Wolverines offensively, posting a
career-high 29 points against Ohio
State on Sunday.
"Gandy did a very nice job of attack-
ing, being very aggressive on both ends
of the floor," Guevara said.
Gandy has also been a defensive
stopper, something the Wolverines may
need just as much as her points.
Michigan did an excellent job of

defending the perimeter last time it
played the Hawkeyes. A tenacious
defense by the Wolverines slowed
down Iowa's sharp shooter Lindsey
Meder, who connected on just 5-of-12
from behind the arc.
"That's what I thought really helped
us the last game against Iowa," Guevara
said. "We did a nice job of containing
their perimeter players, and we're going
to have to have that same type of effort
if not a better effort (tonight)."
In the second half of the Ohio State
game this past Sunday, Michigan

CARVER-HAWKEYE ARENA
Who: Michigan (4-8 Big Ten, 14-9 overall) at
Iowa (8-5, 15-8)
When:8 p.m. 1
Latest: Iowa's sharshooting guard Lindsey
Meder went 5-of-12 from behind the arc in the
team's first meeting this season.
decided to run its motion offense to
solve the riddle of the Buckeye
defense. Up to that point, Michigan's
offense had been too predictable, as the
Wolverines ran their set plays and tried
to pound the ball inside with little
effect. But in the second half, when the
Wolverines switched to their motion
offense, they more than doubled their
point production from the first half. As
a result of this success, Guevara plans
to run more motion against the
Hawkeyes.

For the first few weeks of this sea-
son, the Michigan women's tennis
team has been talking about how it
has been largely over-
looked in the polls. Two
weeks ago, the Wolver- VaRsITYT
ines broke into the rank- Who: Michi<
ings at No. 69. This week, No.6 Tenne
they have perhaps their when: 6 p.m
best opportunity of the Latest: TheV
year to make a huge jump have droppe
up the charts. ings agains
"This is the best oppor- and are 31
tunity we're going to have against Sou
for a while," No. 1 sin- ference opp
gles player Kavitha Tipir-
neni said. "We're definitely
pumped."
No. 8 Tennessee and No. 16 Ken-
tucky come calling at the Varsity
Tennis Center today and Saturday,
looking to pad their records. But
coming off an impressive 7-0 win
against Illinois-Chicago last week-
end, the Wolverines have different
ideas.

By Albert Kim
Daily Sports Writer

"We've seen that any team can
beat any other team on a given day,"
assistant coach Danielle Lund said.
"I definitely think we have a great

shot at it."
Tonight,

INNIi CENTER
gan (3-1) vs.
ssee (4-3)
M.
Wolverines
d all five meet-
A Tennessee
7 all time
theastern Con-
mnents.

the Wolverines will take
on the Lady Vols, who
are trying to recover
from dropping two
matches at the National
Team Indoor Champi-
onships. Michigan is
currently looking to
rebound from a tough
loss to No. 13 Notre
Dame.
On Saturday, the
Wolverines will close
out their season-opening

son why we can't beat them."
The Wolverines are just starting to
get comfortable with their lineup.
No. 2 singles player Chrissie Nolan
returned from a hamstring injury
and has subsequently pulled off two
straight wins.
Michigan went to a new lineup
against Illinois-Chicago last week-
end and it worked well.
"I think that our doubles combina-
tions are an adjustment that we were
very pleased with," Lund said.
Said Tipirneni: "I think we've all
been playing awesome. Everybody
has gotten the job done, and we're
all on the same page."
Michigan will have its hands full
against Tennessee, which it has
never beaten in five matches. But
Michigan fought hard against Notre
Dame, and has played very well in
all of its other matches.
And never factor out the effect of
having heroes of the past in atten-
dance.
"In general, the whole atmosphere
will be a bit exciting with a lot of
returning players," Lund said.

a

six-game homestand against Ken-
tucky. Nostalgia will be in the air, as
alumni tennis players will be on
hand for a reunion weekend. Ken-
tucky is coming off a whitewashing
of Purdue and an upset win over
Notre Dame.
"They're a very talented team, they're
going to be solid all the way through the
lineup," Lund said. "But there's no rea-

Young stymied b
BOI LERMAKERS
Continudfrom Page10A
foul trouble (both fouls coming, foolishly, on inbound
plays) and thus sat on the bench for the better part of the
first half, and the better part of the game.
Purdue's guards - Deane and sophomore Austin
Parkinson - did their real damage on the defensive end,
forcing Michigan to play a game it is not used to playing.
"I think we created by clamping down on Young,"
Deane said. "We tried to get (the ball) in the hands of their
least effective shooters. Michigan is more of a slashing
team. We made it an emphasis to cut that out completely.
"We tried to take (Robinson's) strengths away."

y Purdue defense
Robinson did end the game with team-high 13 points,
but his teammates' shooting was abhorrent. Guards Leon
Jones, Dommanic Ingerson and Gavin Groninger shot a
combined 1-of-26 from the field.
"They forced us to make outside shots," Groninger said.
"Unfortunately, they just weren't going in."
The guards weren't hitting their shots, and they couldn't
find Young. Keady applauded his own defensive strategy,
which worked for the Boilermakers on both ends, as they
were able to turn 16 Michigan turnovers into 24 points.
A somber Michigan coach Tommy Amaker - never
one to make excuses - admitted that his team was "out-
played, outhustled and outcoached in every facet of the
game."

0

DANNY MOLOSHOK/Daily
Michigan point guard Susana Jara and the Wolverines have had trouble recently
playing good team defense on the road.

Transfer
RUbin will
redshirt
this spring
By Brian Steere
Daily Sports Writer

. mi "." i "

When the Michigan men's tennis
team (5-0) faces Clemson and
Alabama this weekend in its first
road matches of the season, sopho-
more Michael Rubin will remain at
home in Ann Arbor.
Rubin, who transferred to Michi-
gan after fall semester, decided to
redshirt this season and retain his
three years of NCAA eligibility. He
spent his freshman campaign play-
ing No. 6 singles for Washington,
which finished the year ranked No.
14 in the nation.
"The predominant reason I left
Washington was because I wanted to
be closer to home," Rubin said.
"Whether it be junior or high school
tennis, my parents hardly missed
any of my matches. But, out at
Washington, it was almost impossi-
ble for them to be there."
Hailing from Canton, Ohio, Rubin
won back-to-back state champi-
onships in singles during his junior
and senior years of high school. As a
junior, he made his run for the title
under the tutelage of Michigan
coach Mark Mees, who was the
director of tennis at the Cleveland
Racket Club before he arrived in
Ann Arbor.
"I used to go up to Cleveland
once a week for about five years and
work with Mark," Rubin said. "The
only reason we stopped was because
he got the job here."
Rubin's brother, Carey, is a fresh-
man at Michigan and also chose to
redshirt this season. Despite their
absence from matches, the two
remain intense practice partners.
"We like to practice like animals,"
Carey said. "Pretty much going four
hours a day and then we lift
weights."
That dedication is certainly
admired by Mees.
"Mike and Carey are two of the
hardest working kids that I've ever
been around,"Mees said. "What's
nice is something like that rubs off
on the rest of the team."
After this season, the Wolverines
will lose three of their six singles
players, including No. 1 Henry
Beam and No. 2 Ben Cox, leaving a
large opening to be filled at the
top.
But (Michael) Rubin is content to
let his tennis speak for itself.
"I'm always gunning to play as
high as I can," he said. "If I could
play No. 1, I'd definitely jump at

Contraceptive Injectionj
medroxyprogesterone acetate injectable suspension

irtk con~trol you-tkirnk a~outt just +)(~a year

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DEPO-PROVERA*I Contraceptive Injection
(medroxyprogesterone acetate injectable suspension, USP)
This product is intended to prevent pregnancy. It does not protect against HIV
infection (AIDS) and other sexually transmitted diseases.
What is DEPO-PROVERA Contraceptive Injection?
DEPO-PROVERA Contraceptive Injection is a form of birth control that is given as an
intramuscular injection (a shot) in the buttock or upper arm once every 3 months (13 weeks). To
continue your contraceptive protection, you must return for your next inection promptly at the
end of 3 months (13 weeks). DEPO-PROVERA contains inedroxyprogesterone acetate, a
chemical similar to (but not the same as) the natural hormone progesterone, which is produced
by your ovaries during the second half of your menstrual cycle. DEPO-PROVERA acts by
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menstruaI cycle, it cannot become fertilized by sperm and result in pregnancy DEPO-PROVERA
also causes changes in the lining of your uterus that make it less likely or pregnancy to occur
How effective is DEPO-PROVERA Contraceptive Injection?
The efficacy of DEPO-PROVERA Contraceptive Injection depends on following the
recommended dosage schedule exactly (see pHow often do I get my shot of DEPO-PROVERA
Contraceptive Injection?"). To make sure you are not pregnant when you first get
DEPO-PROVERA Contraceptive Injection, your first inection must be given ONLY during
the first 5 days of a normal menstrual period; ONLY within the first S days after childbirth if not
breast-feeding; and, if exclusively breast-feeding, ONLY at the sixth week after childbirth. It is a
Iong-term inecable contraceptive when administered at 3-month (13-week) intervals.
DEPO-PROV RA Contraceptive Inection is over 99% effective, making it one of the most reliable
methods of birth control available. This means that the average annual pregnancy rate is less than
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methods depends in part on how reliably each woman uses the method, The effectiveness of
DEPO-PROVERA depends only on the patient returning every 3 months (13 weeks) for her next
injection. Your health-care provider will help you compare DEPO-PROVERA with other
contraceptive methods and give you the information you need in order to decide which
contraceptive method is the right choice for you.
The following table shows the percent of women who got pregnant while using different kinds of
contraceptive methods. It gives both the lowest expected rate of pregnancy (the rate expected
in women who use each method exactly as it should be used an the typical rate of pregnancy
(which includes women who became pregnant because they forgot to use their birth control or
because they did not follow the directions exactly).
Percent of Women Experiencing an Accidental Pregnancy
in the First Year of Continuous Use
Lowest
Method Expected Typical
DEPO-PROVERA 0.3 0.3
Implants (Norplant) 0.2- O.2
Female sterilization 0.2 0.4
Male sterilization 0.1 0.15

if you have had cancer of the breast
"if you have had a stroke
- if you have or have had blood clots (phlebitis) in your legs
" if you have problems with your liver or liver disease
- if you are allergic to DEPO-PROVERA (medroxyprogesterone acetate or any of its other
ingredients).
What other things should I consider before using DEPO-PROVERA
Contraceptive Injection?
You will have a physical examination before your doctor prescribes DEPO-PROVERA. It is
important to tell your health-care provider if you have any of the following
"a family history of breast cancer
an abnormal mammogram (breast x-ray), fibrocystic breast disease, breast nodules or lumps, or
bleeding from your nipples
" kidney disease
irregular or scanty menstrual periods
" high blood pressure
migraine headaches.
"asthma
"epilepsy (convulsions or seizures)
diabetes or a family history of diabetes
"a history of depression
if you are taking any prescription or over-the-counter medications
This product is intended to prevent pregnancy. It does not protect against
transmission of HIV (AIDS) and other sexually transmitted diseases such as
chlamydia, genital herpes, genital warts, gonorrhea, hepatitis B, and syphilis.
What if I want to become pregnant after using DEPO-PROVERA Contraceptive
Injection?
Becau e DEPO-PROVERA is a long-acting birth control method, it takes some time after your last
injection for its effect to wear off Based on the results from a large study done in the United States,
for women who stop using DEPO-PROVERA in order to becomte pregnant, it is expected that
about half of those who becomebpregnant will do so in about 10 months2after their lastinjection;
about two thirds of those who become pregnant will do so in about 12 months; about 83% of
those who become pregnant will do so in about 15 months; and about 93% of those who become
renant will do so in about 18 months after their last injection. The length of time you use
EQ-PROVERA has no effect on how lon it takes you to become pregnant after you stop using it
What are the risks of using DEPO-PROVERA Contraceptive Injection?
I Irregular Menstrual Bleeding
The side effect reported most frequently by women who use DEPO-PROVERA for
contraception is a change in their normal menstrual cycle. During the first year of using
DEPO-PROVERA, you might have one or more of the following changes: irregular or
unpredictable bleeding or spotting, an increase or decrease in menstrual bleeding, or no bleeding
at all. Unusually heavy or continuous bleeding, however is not a usual effect of DEPO-PROVERA;
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In clinical studies of DEPO-PROVERA, 55% of the women studied reported no menstrual
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causes a resting state in your ovaries. When your ovaries do not release an egg monthly, the
re' Irmotlyorw f the liing of or u,,, terusc does no-t or and. ~ther-efr, the bleedilng

6 Other Risks
Women who use hormone-based contraceptives may have an increased risk of blood clots or
stroke. Also, if a contraceptive method fails, there is a possibility that the fertilized egg will begin
to develop outside of the uterus (ectopic pregnancy). While these events are rare, you should
tell your health-care provider if you have any of the problems listed in the next section.
What symptoms may signal problems while using DEPO-PROVERA
Contraceptive Injection?
Call your health-care provider immediately if any of these problems occur following an injection
of DEPO-PROVERA:
" sharp chest pain, coughing up of blood, or sudden shortness of breath (indicating a possible clot
in the lung)
* sudden severe headache or vomiting, dizziness or fainting, problems with your eyesight or
speech, weakness, or numbness in an arm or leg (indicating a possible stroke)
* severe pain or swelling in the calf (indicating a possible clot in the leg)
" unusually heavy vaginal bleeding
" severe pain or tenderness in the lower abdominal area
Pesstent pain, pus, or bleeding at the injection site
rat are the possible side effects of DEPO-PROVERA Contraceptive Injection?
l.Weight Gain
You may experience a weight gin while you are using DEPO-PROVERA. About two thirds of
the women who used DEP0-PROVERA in clinical trials reported a weight gain of about 5 pounds
during the -firstyear of use. You may continue to gain weight after the first year Women in one
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those 2 years, or approximately 4 pounds per year. Women who continued for 4 years gained an
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who continued for 6 years gained an average total of 16.5 pounds over those 6 years, or
ap roximately 2.75 pounds per year:
2. titer Side Effects
In a clinical study of over 3,900 women who used DEPO-PROVERA for up to 7 years, some
worsen reported the following effects that may or may not have been related to their use of
DEPO-PROVERA: Irregular menstrual bleeding, amenonhea, headache, nervousness, abdominal
cramps, dizziness, weakness or fatigue, decreased sexual desire, leg cramps, nausea, vaginal
discharge or irritation, breast swelling and tendemess, bloating, swelling of the hands or feet,
backache, depression, insomnia, acne, pelvic pain, no hair growth or excessive hair loss, rash, hot
flashes, and joint pain. Other problems were reported by very few of the women in the clinical
trials, but some of these could be serious. These include convulsions, jaundice, urinary tract
infections, allergic reactions, fainting, paralysis, osteoporosis, lack of return to fertility, deep vein
thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, breast cancer; or cervical cancer If these or any other problems
occur during your use of DEPO-PROVERA, discuss them with your health-care provider.
Should any precautions be followed during use of DEPO-PROVERA
Contraceptive Injection?
I.Missed Periods
During the time you are using DEPO-PROVERA for contraception, you may skip a period, or your
periods may stop completely. If you have been receiving your DEPO-PROVERA injections
regularly every 3 months (13 weeks), then you are probably not pregnant However; if you think
that you may be pregnant, see your health-care provider
2.Laborotory Test Interactions
If you are scheduled for any laboratory tests, tell your health-care provider that you are using
DEPO-PROVERA for contraception. Certain blood tests are affected by hormones such as
DEPO-PROVERA.

A

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