100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 13, 2002 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2002-02-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, February 13, 2002 - 7

Students debate benefts ofsecurity measures

SECURITY
Continued from Page 1
Monday to lock all residence hall doors throughout
the day does not make Engineering sophomore
Stephen Stamatis feel any safer. He said he feels the
changes in security are more of an inconvenience than
anything else.
"I think they're wasting their time stepping up
security because if anyone really wants to get in the
building they'll get in the building," Stamatis said.
"You stand by the door and wait for someone to exit
or position yourself so you have a short walk to the
floor.... People hold it for you - people are courte-
ous around here, they give people the benefit of the
doubt."
LSA freshman and East Quad resident Laura
Zahodne said she has not changed any of her habits
following the incidents and still leaves her door
H AT E bers will ke
done about
Continued from Page 1 "If we ig
most serious, is not the only recent hate increasing,
crime she is aware of. "People tell me will keep
about bad experiences all the time. You "Homopho
know, people shouting at them and doing because chi
things that don't make them feel safe, but attitudes of
it's not the same thing as beating them Therefore,
up." of higher e
Like the verbal attacks at last year's concerns."
Kiss-In, the hate crime in Montana had at Toy adde
least one positive result. Seven hundred protecting e
Missoula community members gave the discriminati
couple a standing ovation while attend- orientation
ing a rally at a local church on Saturday. has had a ha
Hate crimes "affect a community in a sexual orien
variety of ways - shock, outrage and there is no l
with renewed determination to do all protect the
they can to promote positive social crimes, and
change," Toy said, policy does
University Department of Public because cu
Safety spokeswoman Diane Brown said crimes base
most hate crimes on campus do not esca- . Michigan
late to physical assault. states that d
"We are a community that heavily pro- tion or gen
motes first amendment rights. Our hate crime It
protests tend to be vocal, but they don't ity of states
harm property or people," Brown said. which inclu
"Our folks don't do that. They use their community,
voices and draw the line at harming legislation a
property even, and certainly they draw Michigan
the line at harming people." Ann Arbor)
In Michigan, reported hate crimes to amend th
against members of the LGBT commu- include gene
nity have increased. According to the tation. How
LGBT-oriented Triangle Foundation been made
annual report, reported hate crimes a hearing.
increased 20 percent between 1999 and But Kolb
2000. The Foundation found 121 report- to give up o
ed hate crimes associated with gender "Instance
identity and sexual orientation in 2000. Montana ai
Three of those crimes were murders. need hate c
The 2001 figures for hate crimes having inch
against homosexuals will not be released the legisla
until next month, but some say the num- umes."
the michigan daily

unlocked when she is in her room.
"I feel my residence hall is safe. I feel safer now
because there are always cops walking around now,
And even though it happened here, it doesn't seem
like a reality very much because it's not like it direct-
ly affected me. I never really saw any repercussions
from it," Zahodne said.
Philip Khoury, an LSA freshman and resident of
Baits Residence Hall, said he feels safe living in the
residence hall because it is removed from central
campus where the incidents took place.
"You feel secure when you're not secure because
(Baits) is so far out nobody'll mess with you," he said.
Khoury said he believes the University is taking the
necessary precautions to keep the campus safe by
locking the residence halls.
Following the Feb. 2 incident, a safety forum was
held in East Quad Residence Hall, and University
Housing and the Residence Hall Association spon-

ep rising unless something is
the situation.
gnore it, the hate will keep
and the consequences of that
increasing," Toy said.
bia begins in childhood
ldren experience the negative
their parents and their peers.
schools as well as institutions
ducation must address these
d that the University's policy
employees from work-related
on regardless of their sexual
began in May 1994 and also
ate crime policy that includes
ntation since 1993. However,
aw in the state of Michigan to
LGBT community from hate
I the University's hate crime
not include gender identity,
rrent legislation only covers
d on race and religion.
and Montana are two of 16
o not include sexual orienta-
der identity under the states'
egislation. Though the major-
have hate crime legislation
des protection for the LGBT
six states have no hate crime
t all.
state Rep. Chris Kolb (D-
re-introduced a bill last year
he state's hate crime laws to
ider identity and sexual orien-
ever, little progress has since
and the bill is still waiting for
said the bill is too important
n.
es like what happened in
re the exact reasons why we
rime law," he said. "By not
luded (sexual orientation) in
tion - that speaks vol-

PROTEST
Continued from Page 1
Bush's remarks concerni
member of an axis of evil,
comparative politics Pr
Inglehart said, lumped th
tives and reformers togeth
sition to the United States.
"We could have made th
reform stronger in Iran,'
said. "Instead, we made the
pid and forced them into a
condemning us."
The reformists had been
with the conservatives fo
Iran, and Bush's rem
strengthened the conservat
Inglehart explained.
But Dafna Hochman, de
tor of the Terrorism Track
at the Council on Foreign R
Washington-based think t
as a positive sign tha
attempted to moderate the
demonstration. During t
Khatami remarked, "We
have ties and peaceful rel
all nations of the worl
Israel.
On the other hand, Ho
she believed the demonstr
not forced by the Iraniang
to protest and that 80 per
anti-U.S. sentiment was dir

sored three safety forums Sunday.
"I feel like they're doing what they've got to do. I
feel safe now, I felt safe before. I think it's about self-
awareness more than anything," Khoury said.
LSA junior Katie Yonker said since she lives off-
campus, she had not even heard about the inci-
dents, but she did not feel as if she was in any dan-
ger.
"I'm concerned for the students in the residence
halls, but I'm not worried about my own safety," she
said. "I'm not worried that's going to happen where I
live."
Other home invasions have been reported in Alice
Lloyd Residence Hall, the Law Quad and West Quad.
According to Department of Public Safety reports,
ten peeping tom incidents have been reported this
year. DPS issued a crime alert after an incident on
Dec. 2 in East Quad, and on Jan. I1 when a female
victim was touched while showering in South Quad.
State of the Union address.
Bush took the harsh tone,
Hochman said, mostly because of
ng Iran as a Iran's alleged role in supporting anti-
University Western warlords in Afghanistan
of. Ronald who are destabilizing the interim
e conserva- government of Hamid Karzai, as
er in oppo- well as a shipment of arms to the
Palestinian Authority discovered by
he forces of Israel last month.
" Inglehart Iranian culture and history Prof.
:m look stu- Kathryn Babayan noted the difficulty
position of the U.S. has in dealing with a govern-
ment effectively comprised of two
struggling different regimes - one, a democrat-
r power in ically elected reformist group hold-
arks only ing some power in domestic issues;
ives' hands, the other, an unelected theocracy
holding the largely more influential
puty direc- posts.
ing Project "This has put (the reformists) in a
Relations, a position where there's no way they can
ank, saw it argue for a meaningful relationship
t Khatami when the person you want to have that
tone of the meaningful relationship with regards
he speech you as evil," she said.
intend to "The year 2001 had already seen a
ations with major push on the part of conserva-
d," except tives to crack down on the reformers
and they obviously will take advan-
chman said tage of this anti-American jingoism to
rators were crack down further on the reformists,"
government added Juan Cole, a professor of mod-
cent of the ern Middle Eastern history at the
ected at the University.

PAYMENT
Continued from Page 1
received by the court.
Many residents are already taking
advantage of the system.
"We're averaging about 50 people
per week," Cannell said.
While residents seem to be enjoy-
ing the benefits of the new method,
most University students are not
familiar with the added convenience.
But many students noted that they
would have appreciated using the
online method when paying previous
tickets.
"Online would have been really
nice, because I could've just used my
credit card," said Engineering sopho-
more Josh Murnaw.
Several students said they were not
surprised that the court decided to
allow online methods for paying tick-
ets.
"Everything else is going more and
more towards cyberspace these days.
... so why not speeding tickets?" said
Journalism Fellow Todd Richmond.

RESTRICTION
Continued from Page 1
information about the snow emergency
parking restrictions.
The city decided that temporary signs
were too expensive and labor-intensive
to justify the cost, Wheeler said.
Last week's snowstorm was the first
time the law had been put into effect.
Previously the city rarely restricted
parking during snow storms.
Wheeler said although the city coun-
cil set the fine, the public services
department recommended the $125
amount.
During a December 2000 snowstorm,
the city used tow trucks to temporarily
move vehicles to clear narrow streets.
"It cost us about $125 per car last
year to plow," Wheeler said. "It was a
losing financial operation."
Some students say the fine should be
reduced. "They sent people out there to
generate revenue," said Behnan.
"Obviously people didn't know about it.
... There's no way it should be that
much."

Camp and
Summer Job Fair
Meet with:

4 organizations offering summer jobs

camps 4
nature centers / parks

amusement parks
4 resorts

On-site registration available
Visit our homepage for a list of participating organizations

For Information contact CP&P:
3200 SAB - www.cpp.umich.edu - 764- 7460

fie Univevsity of Mpn
Career Plannn a ent
DWIvImwof cStuden Atln~

SMS 8 s 58 .......... s
-:-x - a X :a see
e ? % e i X.
.. . .. .
...... .....
X.
...................am si Essi

NURSE'S AID
in my home. P/T Female student to work 5
hrs/wk (Fri. late afternoon and Sat morning) at
$11-$12/hour canng for my cheerful, elderly
mother, a stroke victim Pleasant, easy work,
nice environment. Prefer nursing student or
someone w/ similar experience. Please write a
description of your experience, education, cur-
rent situation, work needs, availability, and
phone # to: PO. Box 130634, Ann Arbor, MI
48113-0634.
PRIVATE NURSE AID during Spring
Break needed in my home, for total 23-25 hrs
(U, $1 1/hr Female student pref to care for my
cieerful elderly mother. a stroke victim. Easy
work in pleasant environment. Prefer nursing
student or student with similar experience.
Please write a description of your experience,
education, and current status to:
PO Box 130.634 Ann Arbor, MI 48113-0634
RECEPTIONIST- LOCAL ADVERTISING firm/
marketing firm seeks part time receptionist
Hours are 8:30- 1 pm or I pm- 5:30 pm M-F
Must have strong communication and organi-
zational skills and a positive phone demeanor
for multiple phone systems. For immediate
consideration submit resume to Harris Market-
ing Grog- 617 E. Huron Ann Arbor, MI
48104 Attn. HR. Or fax 734-662-5913. Or
email deanna(ihanis.hmd.com
RESIDENT MANAGER NEEDED -
monthly rent credit towards your contemporary
I bdrm at Carriage House Apts. Call today
741-93(X).
SCOREKEEPERS PUB & GRILL is hiring
part-time office personnel. No experience
needed. Excel and Word helpful. Morning
hours + some weekends. Grab your class
schedule and apply today! 310 Maynard 995-
0100/John.
SUMMER CAMP JOBS in the Endless
Mountains of PA CAMP TOWANDA has
100 openings for positive role models to be
canng, enthusiastic staff Counselors, WSI,
Arts, Athletic Specialists and more!!!
GREAT SALARY & travel allowance.
Interviewing Feb. 19th on campus.
Visit wwwcamptowandacom
for applications and information.

OSCR Open House!
The Office of Student Conflict
Resolution is hosting an Open
House at its new location. Come
and dialogue with OSCR staff
about the Statement of Student

CHILDCARE FOR 4 year-old. 3 wknd
days/mo. Some evenings poss. Responsible.
energetic, own trans. Refs. req. 769-1462.

SPRING BREAK PANAMA City from
$129! Boardwalk Room 2/ Kitchen next to
Clubs! 7 parties including free drinks! Dayiona
$159! springbreaktravel.com
1-8(X)678-6386.
SPRING BREAK SUPER SALE!
Book your trip with StudentCity.com and
save up to $100 per person to Cancun, Ba-
hamas. Jamaica. Padre and Florida Most popu-
lar student hotels including the Oasis and the
Naussau Marriott Crystal Palace!
Prices start at $399! Sale ends soon!
CALL NOW! 1-803-293-1443
or go to StudentCity.com!
SPRING BREAK TICKETS!
Get a FREE MTV audience ticket to select
shows when you book your Spring Break
through StudentCity.com! Go to MTV.com
or call StudentCity.corn at 1-800-293-1443 for
details! Tours and tickets are limited.

SPRING BREAK BAHAMAS Party Cruise!
5 days $279! Includes Meals & Free Parties!
Awesome beaches, Nightlife! Departs from
Florida! Cancun & Jamaica $459!
springbreaktravel.com 1-8(X)-678-6386.

Rights and Resi
and possible ar
0' document.
0'
0o,
04
t l/nrra..l ri.p0

ponsibilities (Code)
miendments to this

Crf- .

Every Wednesday nignt
from 6pm-9pm
January 30th - February 20th
G121 South Quad
located at 600 East Madison
Questions: 734.936.6308 or visit
us at http://www.umich.edu/-oscr

SUMMER WORK OPPORTUNITY for
dependent, hard working students. Great $
travel. Erica 222-5032

in-
&

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN
PLATTE VILLE
Study Abroad Programs
*One of the "Top 25" in The Student's Guide to the Best Study Abroad Programs
-
Learn Your Way Around The World
" Study abroad in England, Italy, Japan, or Spain*
" Courses in liberal arts and international business
" Fluency in a foreign language =9I required
" Home-stays with meals
" Field trips
" Financial aid applies (except for summer session)
Program Costs:
For tuition, room, partial board, field trips, and health
insurance per semester
(for Wisconsin residents/non-residents)

WANTED: SERIOUS PEOPLE to work at
home. PT/FT I-800-956-9501,
www.f-nana-allyN-eal -.-com

MORE THAN A SUMMER CAMP,
AN EXPERIENCE OFA LIFETIME
Trail's End C (Beach.Lake, PA) -
Baseball, Baebal, Golf. Volleyball,
Mountain Biking, Tennis, Ropes Course,
Hockey, Arts & Crafts (Wookworking,
Photography, Fine Arts, VidecVFlm),
m aeirn itmki n . Rra e Can

A ~. 'I U flY 7'"' .1

orr uILl var r vrV, [v twnuar lvx ItGCUuly

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan