100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 05, 2002 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2002-02-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, February 5, 2002 - 7

Second race-based hate
crime trial set to begin

Two white men accused of beating a black Michigan State
trooper for dancing with a white former assistant prosecutor at
a bar face a second trial starting tomorrow in heavily white
Livingston County.
Local leaders say they would like nothing better than rid-
ding themselves of the racist image that has clung to the once-
rural area, now a fast-growing part of suburban Detroit's outer
fringe.
The case grows out of an April 20, 2001 attack on off-
duty Trooper Arthur Williams III on the dance floor of
the Metropolis Bar & Grill in Brighton.
Authorities say two cousins, angry at seeing a black man
dancing with a white woman, shouted racial slurs, punched
Williams and smashed his face with a bottle. He had surgery
to rebuild an eye socket.
"It's a painful thing when something like this happens,' said

Lee Reeves, executive director of the Chamber of Commerce
in Howell, the county seat. "The prosecution is taking it very
seriously."
Jasen Barker, 22, and Travis Sales, 21, were jailed on ethnic
intimidation and assault charges. Their two-week trial in
November ended in a deadlock. After the trial, a majority of
the jurors asked to meetwith Williams and expressed regret
that they couldn't reach a unanimous verdict.
County Prosecutor David Morse sought a retrial, which is
set to begin tomorrow before Circuit Judge Stanley Latreille.
He also presided over the first trial.
"I am really pleased that our prosecutor is pursuing
this," said Brighton City Councilman Steve Manor, a
retired teacher and a co-founder of the racial tolerance
advocacy group Livingston 2001. "This behavior will not
be tolerated."

STUDYING
Continued from Page 1
of the School of Public Health's Human
Nutrition Program, cautions that energy
drinks containing high levels of caffeine
should be used in moderation as one
should limit intake of Red Bull to no
more than four cans per day.
"The recommended intake that you
will see from a variety of health pro-
fessionals is a ceiling of 400 mil-
ligrams of caffeine per day. That is
about four eight-ounce cups of coffee,"
Sandretto said.
"Caffeinated beverages have an
average of 4 milligrams per ounce or
about 48 milligrams per 12-ounce can.
Of course, Mountain Dew has about
twice that much and Jolt has even

more," she added.
In addition to caffeine, Red Bull fea-
tures an ingredient known as Taurine -
a naturally produced amino acid that
helps speed the body's metabolic
process.
The drink also contains well over 200
percent of the daily recommended value
of B vitamins, but the usefulness of
such a large amount is questionable.
"These are water soluble vitamins
and will be lost in the urine if the body
does not need them," Sandretto said.
"Unfortunately, for the drinkers of
these energy drinks, one of the things
that they have is very expensive urine."
Red Bull is among a variety of
energy drink companies to market
its product to young and on-the-go
people.
Free promotional events and prod-

ucts are common on college campuses.
Chinoy said he was introduced to the
drink by Red Bull representatives on
campus who handed out free samples
of the drink to students early last
semester.
Last year, the energy drink mar-
ket increased by 102 percent, with
Red Bull accounting for 68 percent
of sales, according to the Beverage
Marketing Corporation.
Newer brands seeking to cash in
on the trend include Amp, Adrena-
line Rush and Whoop Ass.
For a mere eight ounces, energy
drinks can cost more than two dol-
lars a can.
Last year, Red Bull sales were
more than 135 million wholesale in
the U.S. alone. Red Bull is sold in
50 countries worldwide.

APPEAL
Continued from Page 1
Curt Levey, director of legal and
public affairs for CIR, said he
believes the University may not
appeal an anti-affirmative action
verdict because of pressure frorn
outside groups.
"If you look at the history of
affirmative action cases when the
pro-affirmative action side loses,
there is a lot of pressure on them
from the civil right groups not to
appeal," Levey said.
"There may be a lot of pressure
on them not to do any more dam-
age," he added.
Even if one side chooses to appeal, it
is uncertain whether the Supreme Court
will agree to hear the cases.
"It certainly isn't definite that the
side that loses will appeal and it
isn't. definite that the Supreme.
Court will take it," Levey said. "I
think in this case it is a 50-50
thing."
"We're probably more likely to
appeal than the University," he
added.
When the University of Texas
the michigan
TEACH IN HAWAII. A major teacher
shortage in Hawaii has created the
opportunity of a lifetime. All Degrees
Accepted! www.islandteachers.com

dropped its affirmative action law-
suit, Michigan became the last
institution still defending the law,
which allows public universities to
use race as a factor in admissions
- making the University's appeal
the final battle for those trying to
eliminate affirmative action in pub-
lic universities.
"The Michigan case is the only chan-
nel they have felt in the pipeline to try
and change the law," Barry said.
Typically, most lawsuits are set-
tled through negotiations before
they move to the Supreme Court.
But both sides believe it is unlikely
that they will reach an agreement
regardless of the court's verdict.
"I think it is very clear that there are
strongly held principles on both side of
the case. We believe that diversity in
education is critical to our mission,
and they believe that the constitution
doesn't permit us to follow our admis-
sion policy, so there really aren't any
grounds for compromise," Barry said.
The University's admissions poli-
cies at the LSA level were ruled
constitutional in Dec. 2000, but the
Law School admissions policies
were not.

FUNDING
Continued from Page 1
ments between the House and Sen-
ate.
But Rep. Charlie LaSata (R-St.
Joseph) said he would vote against
the agreement in its current form.
LaSata said he was opposed to
higher education being given higher
priority than other state-funded
programs.
He also questioned whether vol-
untary restraint language would
work.
"I'm not convinced that tuition
restraint language will be effective.
We had tuition restraint language in
the budget two years ago and two
schools raised their levels above
that level," he said.
Smith, however, cautioned that 0
percent increases in funding may
not always be manageable by the
universities.
State Budget Director Don
Gilmer's formal presentation of the
governor's budget proposal is
scheduled for Thursday before a
joint session of the House and Sen-
ate appropriations committees.

HISTORY
Continued from Page 1
Luse hopes the sample of black
heritage presented during the
month leads to a more consistent
effort to learn about black culture
among students.
"The challenge is to get people to
discuss black issues during the rest
of the year," Luse said.
This month's events include an
extended dialogue on slavery repara-
tions, more events honoring Martin
Luther King, Jr. and a cultural show
sponsored by Power Moves, an African
American performance group.
As the University's first all-encom-
passing black culture show, the event
will span multiple areas of African and
Afro-American culture, Luse said.

RED BULL
Continued from Page 1
cross each other out to become neu-
tral. The net result can be heart fail-
ure," Sandretto said.
Monica Ravelle, spokeswoman for
the U.S. Food and Drug Administra-
tion, said the FDA has not issued
warnings for Red Bull because prob-
lems with the product itself have not
been proven.
"The greater problem we've seen
is what the product is being com-
bined with. The difficulty in this
situation is whether we should
question the (Red Bull) or the alco-
hol," Ravelle said.
Red Bull is classified as a drug in
Norway, Denmark and France. In
Japan, it was previously only avail-

able in pharmacies.
Possible health risks revealed over-
seas have in no way deterred students
from using Red Bull.
"Our whole staff relies on it," said
Matt Wattenbarger, bartender at Good
Time Charley's.
Although the restaurant does not
serve Red Bull to its customers, there
is a reserve of the energy drink
behind the counter for staff use.
Rick Buhr, owner of Good Time
Charley's said the drink does not pro-
mote a healthy image for his restau-
rant.
"It just doesn't fit in with what we
do. It's a high-sugar drink that, when
mixed with alcohol, is meant to get
people drunk faster - and that's not
what we're in the business of doing,"
Buhr said.

4f
.,r

44
I

OO~
our 2 r
re- 1

r

Acapulco
CacunC
J amaica
Bahamas
Florida
Group discounts available. Call for details!

fI

"
~1

40'I

I

WA7CY V5002,51

WiA hUi1F
www. sunchase.com
1. 800 SUCSA2

". %I

SSTEtET
TRAVEL
SERVICES
1-800-648-4849
www.ststravel.com

STA Travel
Michigan Union Ground Floor
734-769-2555
On Campus contact:
Brian Brazda
734320-7301

and

SPRING BREAK Bahamas Party Cruise! 5
Days $279! Includes Meals & Free Parties!
Awesome Beaches, Nightlife! Departs from
Florida! Cancun & Jamaica $459!
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386.

SUMMER CAMP JOBS
A fun place to work and a lifelong learning
experience awaits you at YMCA Day Camp
(Highland, MI) or YMCA Resident Camp
(Oscoda, MI). Are you a caring, creative,
and enthusiastic person who would enjoy
working with children in an active, outdoor
setting? Now hiring group counselors.
lifeguards and instructors for: nature,
arts/crafts, drama/music, ropes course.
sailing, and swimming. Call (248)887-4533
for an on-campus interview.
BABYSITTER for 1 yr. old boy. Tues. and
Thurs. (other days occasionally) Thru April.
$7/hr. Trans. required. 996-9253.

FRATERNITIES-SORORITIES
CLUBS -STUDENT GROUPS
Earn $1,000-$2,000 with the easy
Campusfundraiser.com
three hdur fundraising event.
Does not involve credit card
applications. Fundraising dates
are filling quickly, so call today!
Contact Campusfundraiser.com at
(888) 923-3238, or visit
www.campusfundraiser.com

SFritgI biV&k
Panama City Beach
Florida
from $39/night
$215/week
$9.75/person/day
Sandpiper Beacon beach
resort the "fun place"! Home
of the world's longest keg
party
Drink draft beer all week long
" Tiki beach bar
" Entertainment by Boogie
Incorporated'" Bikini contests
" Male hard body contests - 3
pools " Lazy river ride water
slide Huge beachfront * Hot
tub * Mini golf gift shops
Suites up to 10 people.
1-800-488-8828
www.sandpiperbeacon .00

Freshmen
Sophomores..
your
ie business savvy, but things aren't challenging. Well, come join
Staff at the Michigan Daily and become an Account Executive.
advertising locally and nationally, manage your own account
ate ad copy, and earn commission based pay. We're talking big
nce here.

ROOMMATE WANTED Avail. Feb. I to
Aug. On campus loc. Call 216-9177.

00'

#1 SPRING BREAK VACATIONS!
Cancun, Jamaica, Bahamas. & Florida.
Best Parties, Best Hotels, Best Prices!
Group Discounts
Group organizers travel free!
Space is limited! Hurry up & Book Now!
1-800-234-7007
www.endlesssummertours.com

...is
sim

A FREE SPRING BREAK!
Hottest Destinations/Parties!
Lowest Prices Guaranteed!
Best Airlines/Hotels!
Free Booze/Food!
2 Free Trips on 15 Sales.
Earn Cash! Group Discounts!
Bookonline. www.sunsplashtours.com
1 -800-426-7710

OPEN ADOPTION: Loving Ann Arbor
family wants to adopt again. Our 5-yr. old
has a close relationship with her birth family.
and that's what we want for any child we are
lucky enough to raise. Fun home, full-time
parents, great neighborhood, good dog are
waiting to be shared. Smart and affectionate
big sister included. We will want you to be
the important part of your child's life that
you deserve to be. We have been through the
agency process and are approved as an
adoptive family. Call Chris and Jeff at home:
(734).214-1637. We can talk, or send you
more info. and pictures.
SPECIAI GIFT- We're looking for healthy

You've got th
the Business

s " i " "

SPRING BREAK Panama City from $129!
Boardwalk Room w/ Kitchen next to Clubs!
7 narties including free drinks! Daytona

You will sellc
territory, cre
time experie

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan