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January 29, 2002 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2002-01-29

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The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, January 29, 2002 - 7

Families of Sept. 11
victims scrutinized

Come to Sushi

Stephen Push was shocked when the first e-
mails arrived. The senders had seen him on
television talking about his wife, who died in
the Sept. 11 attack on the Pentagon, and the
federal plan to compensate families of the
victims.
"We feel your grief, really," one e-mailer
wrote. "I'm just wondering if we have to feel
your greed too?"
"If $1.6 million is not enough for you, I hope
you rot in hell,"another wrote.
How far the families of Sept. 11 have fallen.
From their pedestals as the collateral casualties of
the worst episode of mass murder in the United
States, the objects of sympathy and the recipients
of donations from millions of heartsick country-
men, they have toppled to become the object of
scorn to many.
This backlash comes after many of the fam-
ilies criticized proposed rules for a federal
victim compensation fund passed by Con-
gress 10 days after hijacked planes crashed
into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon
and in a field in Pennsylvania. The fund,

which promised compensation to anyone
physically injured or the relatives of anyone
killed, as long as the recipients waived their
right to sue, was approved as part of a $15
billion airline bailout.
But some families argue that the federal plan,
which is separate from the $1.5 billion in aid
raised by private charities, could leave some of
them with nothing or next to it.
And that's where things began to heat up.
Families of September 1 1 Inc., a group co-
founded by Push, who lives in Great Falls,
Va., has received dozens of nasty responses to
its criticism, he said - as have other victims'
groups after their leaders spoke out against
the fund's rules. The harsh sentiments are also
reflected in some of the more than 8,000 pub-
lic comments posted on the website of the
Department of Justice, which is administering
the fund.
"The perception has gone from us generating
all this sympathy to a situation where people
think we are as greedy as a pack of wolves," said
Anthony Gardner, chairman of the WTC United
Family Group, based in New York.

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PRESIDENT
Continued from Page 1
administrators.
"I think that people make deci-
sions about coming to the Universi-
ty for all kinds of reasons," Harper
said. "Do not connect dots that
aren't connected."
Harper added that she is not con-
cerned about her position at the
University or the stability of the
institution during this transitional
phase.
"The reality is everybody isn't
going," Harper said.
"There are people who every day
come here and do their work. It
gives the impression that the only
people who matter here are the
senior administrators. That isn't
true. Sometimes, we count the least.

I mean, if we had an exodus of
bright students, then we would be in
trouble," she added.
Last spring, similar changes
occurred at Harvard University,
when former U.S. Treasury Secre-
tary Lawrence Summers was
appointed to the presidency.
Although the institution has not
seen significant restructuring to the
administrative staff, changes have
been made to the style of gover-
nance, said spokesman Joe Wrinn.
"He is much more heavily staffed
as far as wanting people around to
know what is happening," Wrinn
said. "There is more work as far as
preparing information for inter-
views, both on topics and basic
briefings. It's just a more compli-
cated place than it was 15 years
ago."

DEBBIE MIZEL/Daily
ISA senior Jeanah Jung exits the kitchen of Sushi.come
on North University Avenue where she is a hostess.

BIBLE
Continued from Page 1
Rev. Graham Baird of the First Pres-
byterian Campus Ministry said the
TNIV is not the first attempt at making
a gender-neutral translation of the
Bible.
"In the New Revised Standard
version a real attempt was made to
do something gender inclusive in
terms of language," Baird said.
"I'm all for including all perspec-
tives and all people, and any way
we can help more people feel
included by God is a good thing, if
we do it carefully."
Baird said women have con-
tributed to theology and biblical
tradition for centuries with little

recognition, and a gender inclusive
version of the Bible seems like an
attempt at making up for lost
thanks.
"I feel maybe it's over-compensa-
tion, but probably appropriate,"
Baird said.
English Prof. Ralph Williams,
who currently teaches English 401
"The English Bible: Its Literary
Aspects and Influences," thinks the
issue of biblical translation is com-
plex.
. "Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek, the
Biblical languages, variously have
inflections on adjectives and nouns
and have pronouns which indicate
grammatical gender - which is not
necessarily the same at all as bio-
logical gender," Williams said.

Mormons focuso Continued from Page 1
Inglehart said he expects the presi-
dent to focus much of his speech on the
military, but added it would be interest-
ing if Bush touched on the perception
of America in other countries.
Political science Prof. J. David

The Washington Post
SALT LAKE CITY - Rocky
Anderson, mayor of the city that will
host the Winter Olympics next
month, includes in his official press
package an article he wrote about his
happy hours pub-crawling with
members of "the astoundingly beau-
tiful Utah Bikini Team."
Why was the mayor playing foos-
ball at brew gardens with the cur-
rent Mrs. Utah and her gal pals? It
seems Anderson faces an unusual
public relations challenge: how to
convince the world that his city is
not a Dullsville populated by teeto-
taling missionaries in skinny ties
and sensible shoes.
When Anderson met recently
with a group of international jour-
nalists, they kept asking not about
the vibrant arts and culture, bur-
geoning high-technology sectors,
commitment to public transport,
;aeseets or waist-high er
of' the slope'. t-ghpwe
No, the foreign press wanted to
know about the Mormons. The mayor,
a Democrat and non-Mormon in a
state that is solidly Republican and 70
percent Mormon, took pains to point
out that the church should play a role
in the Olympics because of its over-
whelming presence, not to mention
that it was Mormon pioneers who set-
tled this stunning valley and built a
city from scratch. "It is a story worth
telling," he said.
"But there is so much more to Salt
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Lake now," Anderson continued,
boasting not just of the city's virtues
but of its newfound diversity - the
annual gay-pride parades, the growth
of immigrant communities and the ris-
ing population of non-Mormons, who
now account for about half the popula-
tion of Salt Lake City.
It is a fact that the Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is
so entwined in the history, com-
merce and politics of Utah that its
presence at the Olympics will be
inescapable.
From the arcane liquor laws that
require buying "memberships" at
"private clubs" to order a drink, to
the concerts given by the glorious
Tabernacle Choir, to the presence
of 4,000 clean-cut Mormon volun-
teers dressed in dark suits and plain
dresses, the church's influence will
be felt everywhere.
To counter the "Mormon
Olympics" image, Gordon Hinck-
ley, the church's 91-year-old presi-
dent and "living prophet," has
declared that missionaries will not
buttonhole potential converts dur-
ing the Games here next month.
The word from on high is: Keep a
low, polite, neighborly profile.
Show the world that the Latter-day
Saints are a wholesome, vibrant;
conservative but mainstream Chris-
tian religion, and not some weird
cult of polygamists (a practice the
church officially renounced more
than a century ago).

Singer, who said he was cynical of
the administration's handling of for-
eign affairs, argued that the presi-
dent shouldn't be allowed to "get
away with murder."
"We shouldn't let him call it defense
spending. We should call it corporate
welfare," he said. "We're going to be
buying a lot of new weapons that are
relatively irrelevant to national security
needs ... a form of political payback for
the tremendous support his campaign
had from the so-called 'defense indus-
tries.'
In a hint of tonight's speech, a top
HATE CRIMES
Continued from Page 1
report documenting 645 of the hate
crimes that occurred against Asian and
Arab Americans the week after Sept.
11, Mishra considered last year's
tragedy "one of the greatest threats to
civil liberties that we know."
The recent wave of racial profiling
across the country and the increased
use of secret evidence against immi-
grants has led Mishra to believe that
Americans are now responsible for
looking after their own rights, he said.
"We can no longer trust our govern-
ment to protect us. Our communities are
going to have to band together," he said.
The documentary detailed the
accounts of several hate crime victims
and mentioned possible solutions to
the problem, including a wide-scale
effort to educate the public about the
causes and effects of hate crimes.

administration official said Bush
will announce a program to "pre-
serve and extend the great good that
we've seen come out of the evil of
September 11, and extend values
like this throughout America and
throughout the world."
Although one high-profile persona,
Hamid Karzai, chairman of
Afghanistan's interim government,
plans to attend the address at the Capi-
tol, it remains unclear whether another
top official will sit in the House cham-
ber tonight. Vice President Dick
Cheney, who, citing security reasons,
sat out the president's address to Con-
gress the week after the Sept. 11
attacks, has not stated whether he will
take his chair as the Senate's presiding
officer.
The president's address will be broad-
cast at 9 p.m. on all the major networks.
- The Washington Post contributed
to this report.
Mishra advised students to assume a
more proactive role in combating race-
based discrimination.
"It takes real leadership to show
people the conditions of the communi-
ty, and to do it persistently," he said.
Engineering sophomore Mahima
Mahadevan said she learned a lot from
the event.
"I didn't even know about half of
the issues the documentary presented.
It's very shocking to see. I'm actually
surprised to see that so many Indians
are victims (of hate crimes). I thought
(the backlash) was more of an Arab
thing," she said.
LSA sophomore Kimberly Kim
agreed.
"I guess I've been very ignorant
about the backlash, she said.
Mishra plans to go on tour with the
documentary, distributing thefilm to
community-based organizations
around the country.

Meet representative Brad .auman

Tuesday, January 29, 2002

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