100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 25, 2002 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2002-01-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - Friday, January 25, 2002 - 7

I

AP PHOTO
Marilyn Walker and Frank Lindh, parents of captured American Taliban fighter
John Walker Lindh speak at a news conference outside Alexandria federal
court in Virginia where their son was arraigned on charges that he conspired
to kill his fellow Americans in Afghanistan.
Fami ly reficesi

ENGLER
Continued from Page 1
pass his anti-terrorism bill and asked
the federal government to increase
the number of officials at Michigan's
borders with Canada.
As for economic development,
Engler talked about keeping taxes low,
attracting a $1 billion nuclear physics
institute to the Michigan State Universi-
ty campus, easing federal regulations for
the development of fuel-cell technology
to maintain Michigan's dominance in
the auto industry and expanding the
public's access to broadband Internet
technology.
There were few mentions of projects
such as reforming the judiciary or creat-
ing state departments.
Why the more limited focus?
Ed Sarpollus, vice president with the
Lansing polling firm EPIC/MRA, said
there's just no more money for addition-
al projects. The state is currently facing
a $900 million budget deficit and, con-
sidering the downturn in the economy
and its impact on revenue, expectations
are that most programs will see their
funding decreased.
"He's ignoring the problem that
everyone's talking about by saying,
'We're OK, we're building for the
future,"' Sarpollus said.
Engler had to put a positive spin on
things, he added.
"The governor was not going to go to
his speech and say we're going to have
to cut education, and we're g'oing to have
to cut this and this and this," Sarpollus
added, saying Engler's optimistic tone is
perfectly legitimate for a governor.
Meanwhile, it seems state Democrats
and Republicans will debate Engler's
legacy, like their compatriots in Michi-
gan and around the country debate the
legacy of President Ronald Reagan.
"He had 10 years to prepare the state
for a recession everyone knew was com-
ing, but we're suffering just as much as
we were in other recessions," said Mark
Brewer, chair of the Michigan Democ-
ratic Party.
"If you ask the people of Michigan if
they were better off than they were 12
years ago when he took office, they'll
say they are," said Jason Brewer, com-
munications director for the state
Republicans.

The Washington Post
The Kelly household in Rockville, Md., has four kids
and three TVs. Typically, there's a children's show on at
least one of the sets. While Sue Ellen Kelly fixes dinner,
the kids are likely watching one of Disney's many cable
channels. Later that night or on Saturday afternoons, it's
probably Nickelodeon, another cable channel.
On Saturday mornings, everyone's out the door.
"It's the swim meet or the basketball game or the
hockey game or the baseball game or whatever," Sue
Ellen said. "I don't even think the kids turn on the TV
on Saturday morning."
The television battle for kids is over. Cable has won.
The major networks - dogged by a decade of rising
production costs, low ratings and declining advertising
revenue - have thrown in the towel, as a recent spate of
deals illustrates.
Further, a common kids culture - the Saturday-
morning cartoon ritual, when millions of children
watched the same shows at the same time -- is becom-
ing a collateral victim of the changes.
This week, Fox sold its Saturday-morning block of

programming to 4Kids Entertainment Inc. This follows
NBC's move in December to lease three hours of its Sat-
urday-morning programming to Discovery Channel.
Over the past two years, CBS and ABC have farmed out
their Saturday-morning programming to corporate
cousins, Nickelodeon and Disney respectively.
For the first time, none of the four major networks will
produce its own kids shows, which is significant: Net-
work-made children's programming was once a building
block of programming, a way to hook the next generation
of viewers. But even the WB, which caters to young
audiences, recently stopped providing kids shows to
affiliates. The WB has partnered with the Cartoon Net-
work to show that channel's cartoons on WB stations.
In television's early days, when there were only three
channels, networks discovered a captive advertising tar-
get in kids.
Shows such as "Howdy Doody" were wrapped around
commercials for such products as Ovaltine, in which
kids were instructed to tell Mom "more Ovaltine;
please." If advertisers wanted to reach children, and
their parents, they had to go through ABC, CBS and
NBC.

Cable programming hurt
Saturday cartoon lineups

seeing sw
LINDH
Continued from Page 1
charges. Then U.S. Magistrate Judge
W. Curtis Sewell asked whether he
understood the possible penalties,
including life in prison.
"Yes I do, sir," Lindh said in a
quiet voice. He responded, "No sir, I
don't have any questions," when
told he would be kept in custody for
now but would have another hearing
Feb. 6.
At that time, the judge will deter-
mine whether Lindh will remain in
custody without bail.
At the White House, presiden-
tial spokesman Ari Fleischer said
of the highly publicized case:
"The president has faith in our
impartial system of justice. ...
The president looks forward to
justice being done in the court."
Outside the courthouse, Lindh's
parents - who met with their son for
the first time in two years before the
hearing Thursday - said he never
intended to harm Americans.
"John loves America. We love
America. John did not do anything
against America. ... John is innocent
of these charges," said Frank Lindh.
Lindh's mother, Marilyn Walker,

Y again
fought tears as she said: "It's been
two years since I last saw my son. It
was wonderful to see him this morn-
ing. My love for him is uncondition-
al and absolute."
Brosnahan, who met with
Lindh before and after the hear-
ing, said that despite "the govern-
ment's effort to demonize him,
he's a nice young man."
The government's criminal
complaint paints another picture.
While at an al-Qaida training
camp in June, Lindh "learned
from one of his instructors that
Osama bin Laden had sent people
to the United States to carry out
several suicide operations,"
according to an FBI affidavit.
The criminal complaint accuses
Lindh of:
Conspiring to kill Americans
outside the United States.
Providing material support and
resources to a terrorist organization,
Harakat ul-Mujahideen, in Kashmir.
Providing material support and
resources to bin Laden's al-Qaida.
Contributing goods and ser-
vices to the Taliban and to people
whose property and interests are
legally blocked in the war against
terrorism.

ACTIVISM
Continued from Page 1
last night at the Michigan League as
part of the University's Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr. Symposium. They
emphasized the need for solidarity and
greater understanding of heritage within
the Asian American community.
They both stressed that an important
part of this understanding is having
courses in Asian studies at the Univer-
sity level.
"We have a right to these classes so
that our young people can be educated
on what we've done here," said Nashida,
who participated in the strikes at San
Francisco State University that he said
were instrumental in the creation of an
ethnic studies program at the school.
"In very few places where Asian-
American studies programs exist ...
(the programs) were initiated by facul-
ty members. Most have been student-
initiated," Nakanishi said.

Nakanishi, director of the Asian
American Studies Center at the Uni-
versity of California at Los Angeles,
battled for eight years to gain tenure at
UCLA. After support poured in from
other teachers, students, and the com-
munity, he succeeded. He said other
Asian Americans have had the same
difficulty in becoming professors and
gaining tenure.
Both Nishida and Nakanishi said
mobilizing the community is vital in
student activism. Community involve-
ment helped both Nakanishi's struggle
for tenure and Nashida's efforts to
implement an ethnic studies depart-
ment at SFSU.
"The essential part of any student
movement is the ties you have to the
community," Nashida said.
College campuses are environments
where ethnic groups can unite, said
Nakanishi, and it is important that they
work together and not engage in a
"tug-of-war" for their individual goals.

Despite the solidarity necessary for
minority activism, Nashida and
Nakanishi both emphasized the impor-
tance of maintaining each group's her-
itage. Nashida said the American
melting pot can cause ethnicities to
lose identity and conform to a national
standard.
Leilani Dawson, a School of Infor-
mation student, said attending the
forum gave her "a better sense of the
scope of the issues that face Asian
Americans today." Dawson is a mem-
ber of United Asian American Orga-
nizations, which sponsored the
forum.
"It gave me more of a reason to get
involved in the (Asian Pacific Ameri-
can) community," said LSA sopho-
more Soojung Chang.
Nashida said it should be everyone's
priority to make an impact on society.
"When you punch your ticket out,
the world should be a little bit better,"
he said.

RHA
Continued from Page 1
doing this."
But students for the amendment said students'
health should come before smoking privileges.
In the end, RHA President Tim Winslow, an
engineering junior and resident of Baits house,
said the two members who chose to abstain from
voting were responsible for the bill's failure.
LSA sophomore Carrie Rheingans said she

abstained from voting because she felt members
didn't have enough time to talk to the students
they represent to see if residents were for or
against the ban.
"I abstained because my hall hasn't given an
official position," Rheingans said.
Although the first resolution failed, many RHA
members said they were in favor of a similar reso-
lution. Others said the resolution had not been put
to rest and would be a reoccurring theme in
upcoming weeks.

"It's going to come back," said Music freshman
and Alice Lloyd resident Anup Aurora, who said he
is against banning all smoking in residence halls.
"I do think it should be controlled. The Univer-
sity is based on freedom of choice. If we take
smoking away from students, that goes against
what the University stands for."
Regardless of whether RHA passes a resolution
for or against smoking in residence halls, the final
decision does not rest on their hands. University
Housing has the final say.

the michigan daily
MACKINAC ISLAND Resort Hotel and
Fine Dining Restaurant. Seeking summer
staff. Front desk, dining room, kitchen, and
maintenance. Contact Iroquois hotel winter
office 906-643-8293 or email
iroquois@lighthouse.net
MICHIGAN TELEFUND
Now hiring students for flexible night and
weekend schedules. Fun work atmosphere
and great job experience.
Earn $7/hr plus nightly bonuses.
Apply online or stop by 611 Church, Ste. 4F.
www.telefund.umich.edu. 998-7420.
MICROBIOLOGY LAB ATTENDANT
for Ann Arbor biotechnology company. P-T
Please call 734-302-4000 ex. 104.
PERSONAL ASSISTANT NEEDED to run
errands and organize materials. Must be
pleasant, reliable, motivated, and have car
Excellent pay! 4 - 6 hr./wk. 994-1031.
PERSONAL TRAINER WANTED for
growing private wellness center. Candidates
must be heavy motivated individuals with
exemplary interpersonal skills.
734-369-2593
PSYCHIC SEEKS REPS to start self-
employed home business for sale of new
prediction card deck. 313-381-3480;
248-569-7940. E-mail for free online group
chat demonstration: Byrdlady @aol .com

U

ANN ARBOR, CHILDCARE for 2 boys
(7,9) starting April. Need car. Contact Dan
730-2582 or danschul@umich.edu
CHILD CARE IN OUR HOME. Flex.
sched. 8-12 day time hrs/ wk. 1 enfant and 1
toddler. Experience and references required.
French speaker is a plus.669-6257.
CHILD CARE WANTED in A2 home
close to campus. 15-20 hrs./wk. morning,
afternoons and occasional wknds. Tues.
& Thurs. 7:30-1l:00am Exp., refs., & trans.
req. Price neg. Infant, 3 yrs. and 5 yrs.Call
Donna (734) 332-7921.
DRIVER NEEDED to pick up 2 kids (12
&14) for two schools in Ann Arbor. M/W
1:30 to 3:15pm T/Th/F 2:15 -3:15. Need own
car $75/wk. 995-2447 eves. 615-4507 day.
Needed Mar. 4-mid June.
FEMALE BABYSITTER preferred for 2
yr. old special needs child. Mon 1-7 p.m. and
other times available.Tricia 433-9982.
WINTER CHILDCARE substitutes: work
according to your schedule. Great job for
psych and education students. Fun job.
Bilingual encouraged. Call St. Paul Early
Childhood Center: 668-0887.

n8 6bv!
Panama City Beach
from $39/nfight
$21 5/week
$9.75/person/day
Sandpiper Beaconbeach
resort the "fun place"! Home
of the world's longest keg
party!
Drink draft beer all week long
" Tiki beach bar
* Entertainment by Boogie
Incorporated Bikini contests
" Male hard body contests * 3
pools * Lazy river ride water
slide * Huge beachfront " Hot
tub * Mini golf gift shop*
Suites up to 10 people.
1-800-488-8828
www.sandpiperbeacon.com

SPRING BREAK SUPER SALE!
Book your trip with StudentCity.com and
save up to $100 per person to Cancun,
Bahamas, Jamaica, Padre and Florida. Most
popular student hotels including the Oasis
and the Naussau Marriott Crystal Palace!
Prices start at $399! Sale ends soon!
CALL NOW! 1-800-293-1443 or go to
StudentCity.com!
SPRING BREAK TICKETS!
Get a FREE MTV audience ticket to select
shows when you book your Spring Break
through StudentCity.com! Go to MTV.com
or call StudentCity.com at 1-800-293-1443
for details1 Tours and tickets are limited.
Acapulco i
Jamaica
Bahamas,
Florida
Group discounts available. Call for details!
*MUTAY T I

STLDE T
TRAVEL
SERVICES
1-800-648-4849
www.ststravel.com

Michigan Union Ground Floor
734-769-2555
On Campus contact:
Brian Brazda
734-320-7301

RESPONSIBLE STUDENT to post flyers
on campus. Good pay! Ask for Andy
1-800-822-6649.
SCOREKEEPERS PUB & GRILL is
hiring part-time office personnel. No
experience needed. Excel and Word helpful.
Morning hours + some weekends. Grab your
class schedule and apply today! 310 Maynard
995-0100/John.

#1 SPRING BREAK VACATIONS!
Cancun, Jamaica, Bahamas, & Florida.
Best Parties, Best Hotels, Best Prices!
Group Discounts
Group organizers travel free!
Space is limited! Hurry up & Book Now!
1-800-234-7007
www.endlesssummertours.com
$50 OFF SPRING BREAK with
Acapulco's #1 Spring Break Company,
Bianchi-Rossi Tours. Call now for your last
chance to GO LOCO IN ACAPULCO!
1-800-875-4525. Space is limited.
***ACT NOW! GUARANTEE THE BEST
SPRING BREAK PRICES! SOUTH

SPRING BREAK Bahamas Party Cruise! 5
Days $279! Includes Meals & Free Parties!
Awesome Beaches, Nightlife! Departs from
Florida! Cancun & Jamaica $459!
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386.
DISCOUNTED PACKACESI
GUANaANTEEU AVAILAE61A I TV I
CANCUN
JAMAICA
BAHAMAS
FLORIDA...
~r , ~ANdD MORE
S R H BREA M
www. sPRrNGEr MRA KDRECcoM

BACK AND NECK PAIN? Try
Chiropractic. Dr. Jayson Epstein, 25 years
experience. Relief phase intro: 4 treatments
$75. Near UM. 994-5966.

MODEL CONTEST! WIN,
Dreamgirl Model Contract
$1,000 Shopping Spree
Trip to Las Vegas
Official Crown & Sash
www.dreamgirldirect.com

NEW PILATES CLASSES starting. Mat,
reformer, and private. Call 994-1068 or 913-
9046 or visit coregracepilates.com for info.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan