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January 23, 2002 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2002-01-23

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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, January 23, 2002 - 7

ONLINE
Continued from Page 1
Williams and gives students the opportunity to ask
questions relating to the material covered.
Williams said Fathom.com and the University cl
this class because.the Royal Shakespeare Company
formed those four histories in Ann Arbor last wintei
Williams worked with RSC and the University MV
cal Society to bring the company to Michigan, and
he was inspired by those performances.
"To have them here opens up a vision of exceller
he said. "These are truly magnificent plays, and
directing that Michael Boyd's company did was a r
lation."
RSC will return to Ann Arbor during the wii
2003 semester, Williams said, and again in 2005. B
and several RSC actors are featured in video comn
tary in the course.
King said the self-paced non-credit class takes at
three to five weeks to complete. It costs $45 to particip
Fathom will introduce more classes later this y
including "Daily Life in the Eastern Roman Em
(100 BCE - 100 CE): Trade, Travel, and Transfor
tion, and "Genetics, Disease, and the Ethics of C
Testing."
The e-courses join a number of University "features
smaller narratives offered free of charge - which I
been on Fathom for more than six months, said King.
Online classes are intended primarily for Univer
alumni and other non-students. King said he thi
some students will take advantage of the program,
"it's kind of competing with other educational oppc
nities for them."
He credited former University President
Bollinger for taking the initiative on the Fathom p
nership.
Columbia University, where Bollinger will bec<
president in July, is the biggest contributor to Fath
according to King.
King said Columbia is producing 100 mini-coui
this year. Other members include the British Libi
and the American Film Institute.
The Fathom e-courses are not the only forn
online education at the University of Michigan,
King. Distance education is also offered by se
schools at the University, and several degrees car
gained online.
ENGLER
Continued from Page 1
now edits the newsletter Inside Michigan Poli-
tics.
Cuts in many state programs are all but cer-
tain, but the extent of those cuts and in which
areas they will be focused remains unclear.
Also unclear is Engler's position on pausing
planned cuts of the state's income tax and single
business tax. Some state lawmakers, including at
least two gubernatorial candidates - Sens.
Alma Wheeler Smith (D-Salem Twp.) and John
Schwarz (R-Battle Creek) - have called for
doing just that. Ironically, it was Engler who was
the driving force behind these cuts.
Given the current state of affairs, what he
plans to do about these planned cuts remains to
be seen.
The state income tax is set to decline from 4.1
to 4 percent at the beginning of next year. Keep-
ing it at 4.1 percent for another year, according
to Senate Fiscal Agency estimates, would draw
in an additional $130 million into the treasury.
the michigan daily

MSA
Continued from Page 1
MSA President Matt Nolan said the commit-
tee needed to set criteria at the beginning of
the search, and although affirmative action
will be a factor in the decision process, all of
the candidates' credentials will be evaluated.
"Anytime you have a public forum, that
affects the process," he said.
School of Social Work Rep. Aimee Coughlin
said the meeting reiterated the student's sup-
port for affirmative action.
"The students who spoke out in favor were
much larger than those who spoke out against
it," she said.
Concern about the use of cheap labor by
Nike, who produces the University's apparel,
was also voiced by LSA sophomore David
Deeg.
"There is a large constituency of students

"This is an institution
where you have to hat
a thick skin and a vis!
for the future.7'
- EarlL
Presidential Search Advisory Comm
that are concerned with the productiono
apparel. Ithink it's a matter of pride," hes
Additional issues concerning the pres
tial search included renovations to the T
House, tenure for black professors, com
cation between the new president and stu
environmental policies and harassme
women.

GOLDEN APPLE
Continued from Page 1
known for their unique and captivating lecture
styles. The winner receives the Golden Apple
statuette and is asked to give their "ideal last lec-
ture."
Soloway was overwhelmed that his students'
effort to vote enabled him to win this year's
award. Soloway says his conversational method
with his students makes his teaching style
unique. Every day he tries to get the students
involved by asking them "What do you think?"
- attempting to get the students to relate what
they are doing back to their experiences in the
past.
In a class of 50 to 60 students, Soloway said a
key to his success in teaching has depended on
getting most of his students to contribute to a dis-
cussion on a daily basis by the middle of each
semester.
"Teaching isn't about a monologue. I frame
what the students do. I shape it," said Soloway.
Inspired by a high school physics teacher who
had a daily dialogue with his students, Soloway
has always tried to do the same in his 31 years of

teaching. He said classes should be driv
what the students want. Soloway said his pr
goal is to leave students feeling good about
selves when they complete his course.
"I'm not worried about content," he sa
think content will take care of itself if the
good about themselves."
In his lecture, titled "The Joys of Techno
Soloway's speech drew audience members to
and listen, while they remained intent on hisv
Soloway's lecture, delivered to a packed
ence, left several students captivated wi
humor and accessibility.
"He's an exciting presence on stage -c
ly more interesting than most of my profes
said Engineering senior Lee Linden.
Throughout his lecture Soloway stresse
need for engaging children's interest by g
them to ask the questions. He also spoke
the ideals of technology as a process an
need for a new balance between curriculur
technology.
"I like how he said he wants to use dial
said RC freshman Samantha Woll. "He's t
old principles of Dialogue and applying it t<
technology."

RESEARCH
Continued from Page 1
ye sented the report to the Board of
Regents Jan. 17.
ion In terms of research expenditures
from external sources, the Medical
School leads the University with $207
Lewis million in the 2001 fiscal year. The Col-
lege of Engineering followed second,
nittee expending $98 million for research use.
chair The report attributes the University's
success in obtaining research grants to
of our its commitment to interdisciplinary
said. . studies and its high level of responsive-
siden- ness to federal initiatives.
rotter Although the majority of research
muni- costs revolve around programs in the
dents, life sciences, the largest percent growth
┬░nt of in expenditures have been in social sci-
ence programs, according to the report.
More recently developed research pro-
en by grams in the School of Public Health
imary and School of Education have experi-
them- enced expenditure increases by 16.5
percent and 30.5 percent respectively
aid. "I since 1996. Expenditure growth in
y feel Medical School research programs
increased by 9.2 percent.
)logy," Eric Dey, associate dean for research
laugh in the School of Education, said that the
words. increase in social science research can
audi- be attributed to a greater interest in mul-
th his tidisciplinary studies.
"I think the expansion of research
ertain- expenditures reflects two major devel-
sors,"
ed the PI
etting
about
d the
m and
rand ~'ATTEND A Ma
ogue," 410
aking T
onew
17-

opments," Dey said. "Firstthe School
(of Education's) research agenda has
expanded to more consistently include
projects with a national scope, in addi-
tion to working directly with local, state
and regional partners on educational
improvement.... Second, the faculty of
the school has been actively developing
multidisciplinary partnerships with
other campus units."
Dey added that School of Education
researchers often partner with
researchers from the College of Engi-
neering, School of Information and the
School of Public Health.
Nancy Bartlett, an archivist at the
Bentley Historical Library,-shares the
same view in the effects of cross-disci-
plinary research.
"Approachgs in research have
become increasingly diverse, so there's
been more interest in using our ser-
vices," Bartlett said, citing that
researchers from a variety of liberal arts
and life science institutions use the
archives to suit their research purposes.
The library, which maintains the Uni-
versity's archives, is one of several of
the University's cultural organizations
part of the Public Goods Council. The
Public Goods Council was recently
awarded an $860,000 grant from the
Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to sup-
port postdoctoral fellowships focusing
on the use of the University's research
collections.

,

The single business tax, previously expected to
be totally eliminated by 2021, is expected to
drop to 1.8 percent next year from 1.9 percent.
A postponement of that cut would draw in $90
million, the agency says.
"Some of his compatriots, particularly (Flori-
da Gov.) Jeb Bush ... have proposed a slowing
down of the tax reductions," noted Bill Rustem,
a former adviser to Gov. William Milliken and
now a senior vice president with the Lansing
think tank Public Sector Consultants.
"It's going to be interesting what he says about
this in tough economic times when state rev-
enues are hurting."
Another issue likely to be discussed is giving
police expanded wiretapping powers. There has
been a call for expanded police powers after the
Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in New York and Wash-
ington. ,
Engler is also expected to address the Legisla-
ture on his proposal for expanding the public's
access to high-speed Internet connections via a
five cent per-foot tax on broadband Internet
access wiring. Engler argues that Michigan

needs to catch with other states in the public's
access to Broadband and thus the state must take
a more active role in this process.
"He hasn't been happy with the response of
the private sector. Particularly he hasn't been
happy with Ameritech," Rustem said.
But as far as new proposals go, they "will be
tempered by an imminent shortage of new rev-
enue," said Cynthia Wilbanks, the University's
vice president for government relations.
How and if he will attempt to give a boost to
his anointed successor, Lt, Gov. Dick Posthu-
mus, in Posthumus' bid for the governor's office,
also remains to be seen.
Said Ballenger, "Engler's got to be very care-
ful. He's not a great kingmaker. In the past year,
when he's gotten behind candidates when he's
not on the ballot himself, he hasn't done very
well."
The address will be broadcast on Michigan
Public Television and radio, as well as on Michi-
gan Government Television beginning at 7 p.m.
The State of the State address will be followed
by the Democratic response.

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