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January 22, 2002 - Image 11

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The Michigan Daily, 2002-01-22

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The Michigan Daily - SportsTuesday - January 22, 2002 - 3B

Indiana

55
68

Michigan

Blue 'D' picks up the intensity
Oesterle, Bies and crowd play key role breaking 'M' losing streak

RAPHAEL
GOO DSTEIN

THE DowN-LOW
GUEVA-RANT:
On the second half of the Big Ten
season: "There's nowhere to go
but up."
KEY STAT:
Michigan held Indiana to just 33
percent from the field and 5-20
from behind the arc.
TURNING POINT:
After Indiana's Jenny DeMuth hit
two 3-pointers on consecutive pos-
sessions to put the Hoosiers up by
eight, the Wolverines responded by
going on a 28-7 run.
YoU KNEW IT WAS OVER WHEN:
Stephanie Gandy converted a 3-
point play with four minutes
remaining, stretching Michigan's
lead to 13.
THE DAILY'S MVP:
Michigan's Alayne Ingram: Ingram
carried the Wolverines' scoring load,
pouring in 14 of Michigan's 28 first-
half points. She finished with 23
points on 8-for-12 shooting.
BOx SCORE

By Bob Hunt
Daily Sports Writer

Indiana (55)
MIN
DeMuth 30
SGig 15
mapan 22
Cassady 40
Jones 32
McGinnis 33
Skapin 10
Asubhi 9
Hartman 9
Totals 200

FG
M-A
3-10
2-7.
2-7
1-7
4-6
4-13
1-1
1-2
0-3

FT
M-A
0-0
0-2
0-2
8-8
1-2
2-2
2-2
0-1
0-0

REB
0-T
2-5
1-1
2-6
0-2
0-0
0.5
0-1
1-1
1-2

A
0
0
0
0
0
5
0
0
0
8

F PTS
4 8
4 5
3 4
3 11
3 10
3 10
2 4
0 3
00
22 55

18-5414-20 8-29

FG%: .333 FT%: .700 3-point FG: 5-20, .250 ,
(DeMuth 2-6, Cassady 1-5, Asubhi 1-2, Jones 1-1,
McGinnis 0-5, Hartman 0-1). Blocks: 2 (DeMuth,
Jones) Steals: 5 (McGinnis 3, Chapman 2).
Turnovers: 13 (McGinnis 4, Jones 3, Gathering 3,
DeMuth 2, Cassady). Technical Fouls: none.

Throughout the Big Ten season,
Michigan has been the team every-
one lights it
up against. BASKETBALL
Wisc onsin
made a team- Notebook
record 11 3-
pointers, Ohio State shot 60 percent
from behind the arc in the second
half and both Penn State and Min-
nesota had five players score in dou-
ble figures against the Wolverines.
But during Sunday's second half,
things changed.
Michigan finally put the clamps
down on an opponent like it did dur-
ing its nonconference schedule.
After Indiana guard Jenny DeMuth
hit back-to-back 3-pointers to start
the second half, the Wolverines
stepped up their defensive intensity
and held the Hoosiers to 24-percent
shooting the rest of the way.
"In those other games, I think we
didn't make the big play to change
the momentum of the game," Alayne
Ingram said.
The defensive intensity that
Michigan showed down the stretch
on Sunday has been non-existent
during the team's losing streak. The
team had been looking lethargic, as
opponents were able to get easy
Bies and lows
Center LeeAnn Bies has had an up-
and-down season. Here'sha look at
the highs and lows for this
preseason All-Big Ten first-teamer.
Highs:
- Scored 18 points in the second
half of Sunday's game against
Indiana en route to a 68-55 victory.
- Hit two free throws with 10 sec-
onds left to beat Washington 71-70
on Dec. 9. Bies finished with 27
points and 11 boards.
- Had 21 points and 15 rebounds
in a double-overtime victory over
Louisiana State, 85-81.
Lows:
- Tallied one point in the first half
of Sunday's game, thred fewer than
the Keebler Elf in the halftime mas-
cot basketball game.
- Against Ohio State and Penn
State, combined for just 12 points
on 12 shots from the field.
HOOSIERS
Continued from Page 1B
Heather Oesterle was left out of
the hot shooting and went 0-for-8
from the field, including a missed
layup. But she didn't let that stop
her from playing 29 minutes, tying
her season high. Besides her 12
boards, she also had four assists and
a career-high five steals.
Heather Cassady led Indiana in
scoring with 11 points. Jill Chap-
man, the Hoosiers' leading scorer,
scored just four points - 13 below
her season average. Chapman and
Cassady were held to 3-of-14 shoot-
ing.
Michigan never led in the first
half, and fell behind 22-14 with

looks from all over the court. But
Sunday, although they were playing
the second worst shooting team in
the Big Ten, the Wolverines took
strides with their new 3-2 zone.
"We played with so much more
intensity tonight, especially on
defense," Heather Oesterle said.
Because of the team's defensive
success, coach Sue Guevara said
that in the future she would continue
to implement to the 3-2 zone with a
little man-to-man.
HOT AND COLD: By looking at her
shooting, one would think that
Oesterle did not play a key role in
Michigan's victory over Indiana.
"I couldn't hit a layup," Oesterle
said. "So I just focused on helping
my team on defense."
Against Indiana, Oesterle, whose
knee is about 90 percent healthy
after it was injured in practice right
before the Big Ten Tournament last
year, broke a career high with five
steals and tied a career best with 12
rebounds. She also had four key
assists including no-look passes to
Stephanie Gany and Ingram on fast
breaks.
"Most players when their shots
aren't falling, their chins are just
going to go to the floor," Guevara
said. "There are other things to do in
a basketball game besides score. She
scored against.Minnesota, but today

she did the other things that matter
just as much as scoring."
BIES IS BACK: After.two sub par
games, LeeAnn Bies showed why
she was a preseason all-Big Ten
selection in the second half of Sun-
day's game.
After scoring just one point in the
first half off a free throw and taking
three shots from the field, Bies' con-
fidence picked up as she had 18 sec-
ond-half points. Last Sunday against
Penn State, Bies made little impact
in the interior as she rarely even saw
the ball.
But in the final 12 minutes
against Indiana, Bies started to play
aggressively, calling for the ball fre-
quently in the post and returning to
her old form.
"She got the ball, she was very
aggressive, she is very strong and
she is tough to stop," Guevara said.
"We saw that today."
FEEL THE NOISE: Despite the team's
recent slide, the Ann Arbor faithful
came out in support of the Michigan
women on Sunday as 3,859 filed
into Crisler Arena, the team's second
biggest home crowd of the season.
Despite Michigan's slow start, the
fans got riled up in the second half.
"When we started hitting some
shots the crowd got fired up,"
Oesterle said. "And that got us fired
up."

NFCs'quarterbacks are
too good for the AFC

f there's one thing I learned this
year it's this: A good quarterback
is a requirement for a great foot-
ball team. This doesn't necessarily
mean great quarterbacking is need-
ed, as last year's Baltimore Ravens
proved. But if a team can't pass the
ball without turning it over, it stands
little chance of winning. Without a
great quarterback, a team needs a
dominating defense and special
teams to compen-
sate, but without Without a ver
even a very good back, a team s
quarterback, a chance of going
team stands little This means th
chance of going all of Sunday's NF(
the way. win the Super B
This means that
the winner of Sunday's NFC title
game will win the Super Bowl.
Yes, the Pittsburgh Steelers -
who dominated defending Super
Bowl champion Baltimore 27-10 -
have Kordell Stewart, who has
played well all year. While he's no
longer an interception waiting to
happen every time he drops back to
pass, I'm still not convinced that he
has the ability to consistently make
the proper reads. He threw an inter-
ception Sunday, and as the stakes
get higher and the teams get better,
he will likely revert to his old self
and make bad reads that lead to ill-
advised turnovers. If Stewart can
continue to play as well as he has
and avoid the costly mistake, Pitts-
burgh certainly has the defense to
go all the way, but kicker Kris
Brown has become unreliable, mak-
ing about two out of three field
goals he tries. Brown missed anoth-
er kick this weekend. Without a
great quarterback or special teams,
the Steelers' defense will not be
able to carry Pittsburgh to the title.
Michigan alum Tom Brady is the
NFL's story of the year, evolving
from a third-string quarterback into
a Pro Bowler who has guided a team
with last-place talent to the AFC
title game. This evolution really
shouldn't surprise everyone, as he
looks like the same poised quarter-
back that he was three years ago
when he led Michigan to an Orange
Bowl victory.
But he is not yet at the level of
the Rams' Kurt Warner or the
Eagles' Donovan McNabb. He still
lacks big-game experience at this

y good quarter-
ands little
all the way.
hat the winner
C title game will
owl.

two games of his
young career to carry
this over-achieving
team to the title.
Brady, at this stage of
his career, is not

MICHIGAN (68)
FG FT
MIN M-A M-A
Gandy 40 4-6 5-5
Smith 20 1-6 1-2
Bies 33 5-11 9-11
Hauser-Price 8 1-1 0-0
Ingram 40 8-12 5-6
Pool 19 2-7 0-2
Oesterle 29 0-8 2-2
Mason 11 0-3 2-2
Totals 200 21-542-9

level, as the start of Saturday night's
game with Oakland showed. A rat-
tled Brady had a tough time leading
the New England offense, as the
Patriots had to reduce their offen-
sive playbook to screen right, screen
left. It's no surprise that New Eng-
land didn't score in the first half.
While he ultimately found his
groove and guided New England to
a 16-13 overtime win, Brady will
need to play the best

REB
0-T
2-5
1-4
3-10
0-0
2-3
2-5
2-12
0-2

A
0
3
0
0
4
0
4
0

F
2
4
4
0
1
1
1
5

PTS
13
3
19
2
23
4
2
2

ready to handle such
a task, though the future appears to
be very bright for him and New
England.
McNabband Warner - along
with St. Louis' running back Mar-
shall Faulk - are the best players in
the NFL and are racking up points
for their offenses and putting pres-
sure on the opponents to keep up.
Brett Favre was clearly rattled by
the Rams' intimidating offense, as
he tried to keep up with Warner,
Faulk and Co., throwing a career-
high six interceptions. McNabb's
Eagles have going for them what the
Packers lacked - a defense with
the speed to contain St. Louis'
offense, and this might be the dif-
ference in the game. The Eagles'
defense was the best in the NFL by
the end of the year, and if it can
hold the Rams' offense to 28 points
or less, McNabb has the ability to
do the rest himself. The Rams
defense, while it looked impressive
Sunday afternoon, needs to prove it
can shut down Philadelphia's
offense, a task neither Tampa Bay's.
defense nor Chicago's was able to
do. Both of these defenses are better
than St. Louis'.
If the Rams offense explodes like
it has all season, they will handle
Philadelphia and then whomever
gets in their way in New Orleans
two weeks later. These two teams
are the best in football right now,
and whoever wins Sunday will ride
its star to the title.
Raphael Goodstein can be reached at
raphaelg@umich.edu.

1546 11 1768

FG%: .389 FT%: .800 3-pont FG: 2-9; .222 (Ingram
2-3, Pool 0-3, Oesterle 0-3). Blocks: 5 (Gandy,
Smith, Bies, Oesterle, Mason). Steals: 9 (Oesterle 5,
Bies 2, Smith, Mason) . Turnovers: 15 (Gandy 4,
Bies 4, Smith 3, Ingram 2, Pool, Mason). Technical
fouls: none.
!ndiana..............................30 25 55
Michigan........... 28 40 68
At: Crisler Arena, Ann Arbor
Attendance: 3,859
'M' STATS
Through Jan. 20

W Player G
Bies 19
Ingram 18
Smith 19
Gandy 19
Pool 19
Oesterle 18
Mason 18
Jara 18
Hauser-Price 11
McPhilamy 8
Goodlow 5

Min
31.4
37.4
30.2
29.4
25.0
18.5
8.5
16.1
7.1
3.3
26.0

A
1.8
4.4
1.5
1.8
2.0
1.3
0.2
1.8
0.4
0.0
2.4

Reb
9.2
3.3
7.4
4.5
4.4
3.5
2.9
1.7
0.7
0.9
5.6

Pts.
15.8
14.2
12.8
10.5
8.3
3.7
3.2
1.8
0.8
0.0
8.8

DANNY MOLOSHOK/Daily
Heather Oesterle's 12 rebounds and five steals gave Michigan a spark off the bench
against Indiana on Sunday. This was just the Wolverines second win in Big Ten play.

Field-goal percentage leader
Bies 99-189 .524
Free-throw percentage leader
Ingram 36-44 .818
3-point percentage leader
Ingram 39-88 .443
BIG TEN STANDINGS
Conference Overall

eight minutes remaining. The
Wolverines rallied and ended the
half on an 8-1 run to pull within two
(30-28) at the break.
Ingram scored half of Michigan's
first half points on 5-of-6 shooting,

including two 3-pointers.
The Wolverines will next head to
Champaign on Sunday to play Illi-
nois. The Illini defeated Michigan
85-81 in Wolverines conference
opener.

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L
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L
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HAWKEYES
Continued from Page 11B
faced wrestling powerhouse Iowa,
which was ranked No. 5. The
Wolverines won seven of the nine
matches to beat the Hawkeyes 23-
12. Michigan's big win came from
157-pounder Ryan Bertin in his
match against eighth-ranked Matt
Anderson. Bertin and Anderson each
have very distinct styles of wrestling,
which made for a very interesting
match. Bertin is an aggressive, offen-
sive wrestler, whereas Anderson is a
countermove, defensively-oriented

wrestler. The match went back and
forth and ended up in double-over-
time. Bertin won the coin toss, chose
bottom, and easily escaped to score a
vital three points for Michigan.
"He was tying me up when I
would shoot, but I knew I would
have to keep wrestling," Bertin said.
"I was hoping that if I just kept
wrestling hard, that things would
work out, and they did."
In the semifinals, Michigan faced
off against Minnesota, and didn't
seem to have an answer for the
nation's best team. Minnesota won
all the close matches to beat Michi-

gan 26-6. On Sunday, in the consola-
tion bracket, Michigan lost a close
match to Iowa State, but pulled off a
come-from-behind win over No. 2
Oklahoma. Down by 13 points after
three matches, Mike Kulczycki,
Charles Martelli and Andy Hrovat
upset higher ranked opponents to
fuel the Wolverines comeback:
C I a tlncunAcap c0,zf a

SUMMER
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