100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 17, 2002 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2002-01-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - Thursday, January 17, 2002 - 7A

HADDAD
Continued from Page 1A
ful," Rivers said.
The Founding Fathers understood that the
power of the Federal government was so much
greater than any individual, there had to be pro-
tection, Rivers said.
"Because we are afraid, we are abandoning
these sacred protections," Rivers said. "The aver-

age person doesn't understand why this is wrong."
Steinberg urged the audience not to "feed into
unfair stereotypes of people ... and guard
against knee-jerk reactions."
He said he feels such conduct "destroys trust
between law enforcement and the very people
who could help."

Steinberg said writing to Congress and the
Immigration and Naturalization Service is one
way citizens can help Haddad, but it will proba-
bly be a long and difficult process.
SAFE planned the event, but it also received
some funding from other student groups.
"Last night we made a lot more fliers and a
program within the last two hours because of
Michigan Student Assembly funding," Kiblawi
said.

"Secrecy in judicial proceedings is
concept to the U.S.," Steinberg said.
open proceedings the check is gone."

a foreign
"Without

BOOKS
Continued from Page 1A
well as DVD."
Others, such as book lover Sumari
Mayor, said the high sales numbers
weren't merely a result of the gift-
giving season.
"The holiday season is just an
excuse to buy a gift for somebody,"
said Mayor, who is visiting Ann
Arbor from South Africa with her
husband, a University fellow. She
said she believes books have become
more popular world-wide because
"people's value systems have
changed."
Ironically, Mayor said she thinks
the struggling economy is at least
partly responsible for th increase in
book sales.
"It's a whole economical experi-
ence," she said, adding that Ameri-

cans especially have a reason for
wanting more bang for their buck
after Sept. 11.
"When they buy gifts, they want
something more tangible. They are
looking to find more meaning in life
... when people spend money, they
want to spend it on something worth-
while," she said.
At Borders and Shaman Drum,
book sales decreased immediately
following Sept. 11 and didn't start
rising again until November.
"I (attribute) that to people paying
more attention to the media. ...
Newspapers and online sources took
up a lot of their time," Rohlen said.
But now, she added, "people have
turned to literature to get over what
happened."
Not everybody can come up with a
reason for reading, and some new
book enthusiasts said there wasn't

one.
LSA freshman Laura Kline said
she never read in high school but
now stops by area bookshops at least
once a week. She said doesn't know
a precise reason for the change.
"On the way home from class, I'll
just stop in and stay here for awhile,
reading," she said, adding that there
aren't many bookstores or opportuni-
ties for reading in her hometown. "I
just like coming here and reading.
It's relaxing."
Some experts agree with Mayor.
In its 2002 book report, the maga-
zine "Pages" outlined some reasons
for why book buying doesn't
decrease with the economy.
According to the report, "The
business of books continues to be
one in which American consumers
revel, and reading continues to be a
freedom we all share and enjoy."

SNOW
Continued from Page :A
caused dozens of accidents reported to
the Washtenaw County Sheriff's
Department, including at least one crash
with injuries, although no further infor-
mation was available last night.
Ann Arbor Police had only responded
to one spinout within a few hours of the
snowfall, but Sgt. Brian Jatczak said he
expected many more.-
Back on campus, the annual quest for
bragging rights between the two resi-
dence halls began around 8:45 last
night, and by 9 it was a full-blown bat-
tle. By 9:15, it was a war.
While South Quad may have appeared
to have the edge early on, its neighbor
across the street emerged victorious.
"We didn't do anything like this," said
LSA sophomore Claire Stanow, a recent
transfer from. Kalamazoo College.
"There was a lot of streaking, but no
snowball fights."
"I got knocked on mybutt by some-
one on this side," added Stanow, in her
second week of living in South Quad.
At 9 p.m., Stanow's South Quad
seemed to have the edge, outnumbering
its cross-street rival three to one. It had
made several major assaults on West
Quad; West Quad had made only one.
In an atmosphere thick with flying
snow and noisy chaos, charges were led
by foot soldiers as well as one individual
with a megaphone shouting from the
upper floors of South Quad.
By 9:15 West Quad had as many -
if not more - troops than its opponent
and began launching charge after
charge, all of them unsuccessful.
The "troops" would crouch behind
cars parked on the street, throwing a
snowball across the windshield.
But students from both sides appar-
ently had a common enemy. When a
Department of Public Safety vehicle
drove through the street it was pelted
many times over with the best both sides
could muster. Other vehicles, including
a Night Owl bus, were subjected to the
same treatment.
"I come back here every year," said
former West Quad resident Ike Okenwa,
a Kinesiology senior who now lives on
South Fifth Avenue. "I wouldn't miss it
for the world."
By 9:30, out of snow on their side of
the street, South Quad residents retreat-
ed into the courtyard where they loaded
trash cans with snow and resupplied
their troops on the Madison Street front.
West Quad declared victory by 10.

:,._ ii.. ...
DEBBIE MIZEL/Daily
LSA juniors Laurin Gracey and Alicia Hall gather travel information at STA Travel in
the Michigan Union yesterday. Wherever they go, they are likely to face travel
delays as airports scramble to meet new security regulations.

SECURITY
Continued from Page1A
removed before the plane can leave
the gate. In theory, this method will
deter potential terrorists from walk-
ing away after checking a suitcase
that contains a bomb.
The problem arises when people
check their bags and then go out to
have a cigarette or miss their flights
for some other reason, said Detroit
Metropolitan Airport spokesman
Len Singer. The bags must be iden-
tified and removed from the plane
and then held until someone claims
them.
"It is this final step in the process,
when the flight is getting ready to
leave, where I think the most delays
will take place," Singer said.
Frequent flier Charlie Corbin,
branch manager of STA Travel,
adds that bag matching will not pre-
vent any suicidal person from
checking their bomb-laden suitcase
and boarding the plane.
Corbin, who has flown both
domestically and internationally
since the terrorist attacks on Sept.
11, is not looking forward to flying
to San Francisco in two weeks.

"It doesn't sound like the airlirfes
are prepared to meet the new regux-
lations yet," he said. "Everyone just
isn't on the same page. Hub cities
like Detroit, Chicago, and New
York may be OK, but small cities
are just not equipped."
Although security reasons prevent
airlines from disclosing the specific
details of their plans to meet the
new standards, Jim Light, director
of corporate security at Spirit Ai-
lines, is confident that the airlines
are in good shape.
"In an effort to meet the Decein-
ber 31 deadline, security measures
have gotten more thorough every
week - every day,,even. It's nut
going to be like the good old days
where you can throw your hag on
the conveyor belt," he said.
Despite the hassle the security
standards will create, Corbin still
plans on traveling often.
"I guess I'll just have to take my
chances. But I wish security would
use more common sense. I see them
checking people wearing penry
loafers but not stopping peopA
wearing hiking boots. What are yau
going to put in a penny loafer?"

EARLY ELEMENTARY junior or senior. VOLLEYBALL COACH -for girls' team at
Center seeking teaching major as program Emerson Middle School in 'Ann Arbor.
director/preschool teacher. Part-time. Season is Feb.-Apr. Practices and games are
6hrs/day, 5 days/wk. Pluses are small weekdays after, school. Interested persons
groups, well behaved children and low staff should contact Bill Schrock at 665-9005, ext.
turnover. $8.50-9.50/hr. 734-998-0180. 213 or bschrock@emerson-school.org.

#1 SPRING BREAK VACATIONS!
Cancun, Jamaica, Bahamas, & Florida.
Best Parties, Best Hotels, Best Prices!
Group Discounts
Group organizers travel free!
Space is limited! Hurry up & Book Now!
1-800-234-7007
www.endlesssummertours.com

ENERGETIC, ENTHUSIASTIC individual
wanted to help w/household tasks. Female
pref. 12 -15 hrs./wk. $11/hr. to start. Must
have refs. and own transportation. Call 665-
0702.
GOT THE BLUES? FEELING DOWN?
People suffering from depression needed for
a research project studying brain chemistry.
Must be 18 to 50, healthy, medication free
including birth control pills and hormones,
non-smoker, with normal sleep-wake cycle.
Evaluation includes physical exam, EKG,
blood work and an interview. Study requires
teo half-days at the hospital, an IV and blood
draws. Compensation: $150. Call 936-4845.
GYMNASTICS: Champion Gymnastics is
hiring recreational/team and cheerleading
coaches. Flexible hours, Fun atmosphere!
Call Dave or Laura @ (734)426-3289.
HAVE THE GREATEST SUMMER!
Camp Pontiac is a premier overnight camp
in NY looking for fun and enthusiastic
individuals to be counselors this summer.
On campus interviews. Monday, Jan. 28th.
.Email capippontiac@hotmail .com
to set up an interview..
HORIZON CAMPS
Are you DYNAMIC, compassionate,
motivated and looking for the EXPERIENCE
OF A LIFETIME? If so, Horizon Camps is
the place for you! We are five
OUTSTANDING co-ed summer camps,
seeking AMAZING staff to work with
INCREDIBLE kids, ages 7-15. Locations:
NY, PA, ME, WV. All types of positions
available! Salary, room, board, laundry,
travel. www.horizopcamps.com
800-544-5448.
LOOKING FOR A person that recently
took the GMAT and scored 700 or above to
tutor someone who needs to increase her
score. Pay and tutoring hours are negotiable.
Please call 248-478-4470, if interested.

WAIT PERSON for sorority - relia
Great job, great food. $7.50 + food.{
House Director. 662-3418.

able.
Call

$50 OFF SPRING BREAK with
Acapulco's #1 Spring Break Company,
Bianchi-Rossi Tours. Call now for your last
chance to GO LOCO IN ACAPULCO!
1-800-875-4525. Space is limited.

CHILD CARE WANTED in A2 home
close to campus. 15-20 hrs./wk. morning,
afternoons and occasional wknds. Tues.
& Thurs. 7:30-11:00am Exp., refs., & trans.
req. Price neg. Infant, 3 yrs. and 5 yrs.Call
Donna (734) 332-7921.
CHILDCARE WANTED. 4-8 hrs/week.
Reliable car. 662-8424.
FEMALE BABYSITTER preffered for 2
yr. old special needs child. Mon 1-7 p.m. and
other times ava lable.Tricia 433-9982.
LIKE NINTENDO movies and monopoly?
If so come be our sitter while mom and dad
go out. $8/hr Occas. wknd./eves. 327-5056.
NEED SITTER FOR THURS. nights
starting immediately, 5:30 p.m. - I a.m. for 2
elementary-age boys. Trans. and refs.
required. Call Lorrie (734) 834-4857.
NEEDED Daycare provider for 9 & 5 yr. old
children . P/T from 6pm until 8:20am.
424-9620.
P/T NANNY NEEDED for work and
residence in Ann Arbor and Dexter. $8/hr. +
trans. Female perferred. 734-424-0829.
PROFESSIONAL MOM with part-time job
needs sitter for two happy, sweet children
ages 2 and 5 in my Saline home. Exams and
vacations no problem. (734) 944-8228.

A FREE SPRING BREAK!
Hottest Destinations/Parties!
Lowest Prices Guaranteed!
Best Airlines/Hotels!
Free Booze/Food!
2 Free Trips on 15 Sales.
Earn Cash! Group Discounts!
Bookonline. www.sunsplashtours.com
1-800-426-7710
SPRING BREAK Bahamas Party Cruise! 5
Days $279! Includes Meals & Free Parties!
Awesome Beaches, Nightlife! Departs from
Florida! Cancun & Jamaica $459!
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386.

CURRY
Continued from Page 1A
this incident is resolved Curry will go
back to the football team next fall.
"I would hope that given this reso-
lution that we've reached, he's eligible
for reinstatement. I would hope that is
what happens," said Fishman.
Commenting on the likelihood of
Curry returning to the team, Fishman
said that the decision was not up to
him, but added, "Coach Carr has
always shown very good judgment in
disciplinary action."
A sentencing hearing will be held
Feb. 14 at 9 a.m. at the Washtenaw
County Courthouse. The maximum

sentence for assault with no battery
is 90 days in prison. However, in
Curry's case, there is a likelihood ef
a probationary period with no ja4l
time.
Assistant Prosecutor Lela Rashid
said her office is investigating Curryfs
case, and it is too early to comment
on what sort of the punishment the
prosecutor would recommend to the
judge.
"Probation does a pre-sentence
report, and then the prosecutor will
take a look at it, and then we'll sUp-
port it or we'll ask the court to devi-
ate it," Rashid said.
Curry is the younger brother of
junior safety Julius Curry.

SPRING BREAK Panama City from $129!
Boardwalk Room w/ Kitchen next to Clubs!
7 parties including free drinks! Daytona
$159! springbreaktravel.com
1-800-678-6386.
SPRING BREAK SUPER SALE!
Book your trip with StudentCity.com and
save up to $100 per person to Cancun,
Bahamas, Jamaica, Padre and Florida. Most
popular student hotels including the Oasis
and the Naussau Marriott Crystal Palace!
Prices start at $399! Sale ends soon!
CALL NOW! 1-800-293-1443 or go to
StudentCity.com!

7of Xi Pis now availab
almost -70'O fffor oly
You buy itbeca use: l

MICHIGAN TELEFUND
Now hiring students for flexible night and
weekend schedules. Fun work atmosphere
and great job experience.
Earn $7/hr plus nightly bonuses.
Apply online or stop by 611 Church, Ste. 4F.
www.telefund.umich.edu. 998-7420.

WINTER CHILDCARE substitutes: wo
according to your schedule. Great job f
psych and education students. Fun jo
Bilingual encouraged. Call St. Paul Ear
Childhood Center: 668-0887.

rk
or
b.

*

ly SPRING BREAK TICKETS!
Get a FREE MTV audience ticket to select
shows when you book your Spring Break
through StudentCity.com! Go to MTV.com
or call StudentCity.com at 1-800-293-1443
for details! Tours and tickets are limited.

NEED A FEW EXTRA BUCKS?
Church needs a student to: change light
bulbs, run errands, spot clean, do basic yard
work, etc. Must have own transportation. Be
avail. 2 days/wk Tues.-Sat. anytime between
10am and 5pm 5-15hrs/wk $7.50/hour or
better. 769-4157.
NURSERY WORKER NEEDED for local
church, Sundays 10 a.m.-12. Must be
reliable, nurturing, non-smoking adult. $8/hr.
Call 995-5688, leave message.
PART-TIME RECEPTIONIST wanted.
9am-lpm Mon.-Fri for Progressive Mortgage
Co. Located in A2. Close to campus, great
office environment. Job will include
answering phones, and some processing of
mortgage applications. Must be friendly,
courteous, well-spoken, and willing to learn.
Pr ofessional attire req. Please email resume
tofcmaa@aol.com or fax to 734-821-0271.
PHYSICAL ASSISTANT NEEDED for
physically disabled law student. Hrs. vary.
Pay neg. Will train. Call Chris at 302-2496.
RELIABLE DRIVER NEEDED 2:45-
3:30pm, Tues. Thurs. & Fri. Old West Side.
$20/ride. Call Julie at 769-9450 after 5pm.

Acapulco
Bahamas
Floridasut
Gr..p dsconsaalal.Cal o dtis!

E

A) It can help student S tayaedIShOL..
E) It comesWithfullversionsoutlokf.crosoftW
Exel o l kand PowefpWordC
)It's atmlo .

d
I
J t
x wH

C,

- . %0 A iii11CO O

w
H
U
Y
,4
'}

Spri4 bre~&k
Panama Cit Beach
from $391Wight
$215/wee k
$9.75/person/day
Sandpiper Beacon beach
resort phe "fun place"! Home
of the world's longest keg
party!
Drink draft beer all week long
" Tiki beach bar
" Entertainment by Boogie
incorporated " Bikini contests
" Male hard body contests " 3
pools " Lazy river ride water
slide " Huge beachfront - Hot
tub " Mini olf gift shop *"
Suites up to 10 people.
1-800-488-8828
www.sandpiperbeacon.Corn
- 7,- "n P

D) All of the

STiDE T
TRAVEL
SERVICES
1-800-648-4849
www.ststravel.com

STA Travel
Michigan Union Ground Floor
734-769-2555
On Campus contact:
Brian Brazda
734.320-7301

o V e Uma n nm eRrtU .....

f

I(

I

-+ k
5 9
i

FRATERNITIES - SORORITIES
CLUBS - STUDENT GROUPS
Earn $1,000-$2,000 with the easy Campus-
fundraiser.com three hour fundraising event.
Does not involve credit card applications.
Fundraising dates are filling quickly, so call
today! Contact Campusfundraiser.com at
(888) 923-3238, or visit
www.campusfundraiser.com
NEW PILATES CLASSES starting. Mat,

Microsoft" Office XP Standard for Students and
Teachers is now available at a special low price.
With all the tools to help students get more done,
faster and easier. It's a no-brainer. Buy it today
at one of the retailers below.

AL STUDENT MESSENGERS (2) Deliver

SS2microsoft.com/office/forstudents

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan