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November 30, 2001 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2001-11-30

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, November 30, 2001

NATION/WORLD

41

Citizenship offered for terrorist info

WASHINGTON (AP) - Seeking to gain
improved cooperation, the Justice Department yes-
terday offered foreigners a fast track to American
citizenship if they give investigators useful informa-
tion about terrorists.
"The people who have the courage to make the
right choice deserve to be welcomed as guests into
our country and perhaps to one day become fellow
citizens," Attorney General John Ashcroft said in
announcing the program.
The program will provide aliens a long-term visa
that could lead to permanent residency or citizen-

ship. Ashcroft stressed even illegal immigrants with
valuable information could be aided.
Ashcroft offered the carrot while defending the
administration's stick in the domestic war on terror-
ism - its decision to allow the creation of secretive
military courts to try accused terrorists.
Meanwhile, a federal magistrate in suburban
Alexandria, Va., ordered an Indonesian man accused
of document fraud held without bail because prose-
cutors showed he had close ties to some of the Sept.
11 hijackers.
The "responsible cooperators program" would

defer deportation indefinitely for illegal aliens who
qualify, and allow those with visa problems to enter
the country.
Foreigners who "provide information that is reli-
able and useful in the apprehension of terrorists or
prevention of acts of terrorism" would be eligible for
the program, Ashcroft said in a memo to the FBI, the
Immigration and Naturalization Service and the Jus-
tice Department's criminal division.
It would be up to federal prosecutors to decide
whether the information provided meets the stan-
dard, Justice Department officials said.

UNIVERSITY
OF
MICHIGAN
students, alumni, faculty

OR

MICHIGAN
STATE
UNIVERSITY
students, alumni, faculty

NEWS IN BRIEF.
GAN SH MUEL, Israel
Explosion on bus kills at least 3 Israelis
An explosion tore through a bus on a main highway in Israel's north yes-
terday, and police said three passengers and a Palestinian suicide bomber
were killed.
An eyewitness, Emanuel Biton, told Army Radio he saw the blast "rip the
bus into pieces, and things were flying everywhere."
Police said a suicide bomber set off the explosion, killing three passen-
gers. Six other people were injured, two critically, doctors said.
The bus was near an Israeli military base when the bomb went off, ripping
off its sides and part of the roof. Ambulances and police vehicles raced to
the scene on the highway, which runs east to west from Hadera near Israel's
coast to Afula, near the Jordan River valley.
The bus attack came as U.S. envoy Anthony Zinni was holding talks with
Israeli and Palestinian leaders, trying to cement a truce to end 14 months of
violence.
"Unfortunately, there is no letup in the wave of terror against the state of
Israel," said Dore Gold, an adviser to Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon.
Sharon was about to leave for the United States when the bomb went off
on the bus. It was not known whether he would postpone his trip.
WASHINGTON
NASA to examine why tail fell off Flight 587
National Transportation Safety Board investigators have asked NASA to help
them find out why the tail of American Airlines Flight 587 fell off.
The board said yesterday that the vertical stabilizer and rudder are being sent
to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's research center in
Hampton, Va. The center has expertise in analyzing nonmetallic composite mate-
rials of the kind used to build the tail on the Airbus A300, the board said.
"We know the tail came off in flight and we're trying to find out why it hap-
pened," NTSB spokesman Ted Lopatkiewicz said.
This is not the first time NASA has been asked to help with a safety board
investigation, but it is the first time the focus has been on the lighter-weight com-
posites increasingly used in airplane construction.
Investigators have been focusing on the tail, which sheared off the plane -before
it crashed Nov. 12 shortly after takeoff from Kennedy Airport in New York. All
260 people on board and five on the ground were killed. Aviation experts have
said that the tail should not have fallen off the plane even though the aircraft hit
two wakes from a Japan Air Lines 747 that took off before it.

4

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WASHINGTON
Fugitive suspected
in anthrax hoaxes
Clayton Lee Waagner, one of the
FBI's most-wanted fugitives, is a sus-
pect in a string of anthrax hoax letters
sent to abortion clinics, Attorney Gener-
al John Ashcroft announced yesterday.
Ashcroft said the FBI had obtained
information over the Thanksgiving holi-
day indicating Waagner had claimed
responsibility for sending more than
280 letters to clinics across the United
States. The FBI considers Waagner
"extremely dangerous. He has survival
skills and may be heavily armed," Assis-
tant FBI Director Rueben Garcia said.
Ashcroft called Waagner a "self-
described anti-abortion warrior."
The Feminist Majority Foundation
said more than 450 clinics and advocacy
organizations in 12 states received let-
ters in envelopes carrying white powder
and letters signed by "the Army of
God." None of the powder sent to the
clinics has tested positive for anthrax.
UNITED NATIONS
Iraqi sanctions set
to be overhauled
The Security Council unanimously
approved a resolution yesterday
extending the U.N. humanitarian
program in Iraq and setting the stage
for an overhaul of U.N. sanctions
against Baghdad next year.
The resolution was drafted by the
United States and Russia, which
have been feuding over policy
toward Iraq for several years, and

marked another sign of growing
cooperation between Washington
and Moscow, especially since the
Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.
Disputes over Iraq have usually
left extension of the oil-for-food
humanitarian program to the last
moment.
But the U.S.-Russian compromise
enabled the.-council to approve a six-
month extension a day before the
current phase expires at midnight
today.
LONDON
Ecstasy more harmful
to women than men
Ecstasy, the increasingly popular
party drug, may cause more brain
damage in women than in men, new
research suggests. A study published
this week in The Lancet medical jour-
nal compared brain scans of people
who had taken 50 or more Ecstasy
tablets in their lifetimes with those of a
group who had never taken the drug.
The findings indicated women - but
not men - lost a significant number
of brain cells, even though the men
had taken more Ecstasy over the years.
Fifty tablets is considered the thresh-
old for increased risk of developing psy-
chiatric problems. Experts said the
preliminary findings raised an interest-
ing possibility but that larger studies are
needed to confirm the results. The ille-
gal drug, also known as MDMA, is also
said to suppress the need to eat, drink or
sleep, making it possible to endure par-
ties for two or three days.
- Compiled from Daily wire reports.

a
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