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November 12, 2001 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 2001-11-12

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2B -The Michigan Daily - SportsMonday - November 12, 2001

0

CLUBSPORTSWEEKLY
- Edited by Kareem Copeland and Jim Weber
New look women's
hockey finds success

Face of fear

AHETEidiFTHWilE
ATHLETE 0OF THE WEEK,

Who: Catherine Foreman
Hometown: Happy Valley, South Australia
Position: Defender

Sport: Field Hockey
Year: Senior

By Dan Rosen
Daily Sports Writer
The Michigan women's hockey club
added eight freshmen to this year's ros-
ter, but one wouldn't guess that after
watching one of its games.
On Saturday night, the team out-shot
Buffalo for a 4-0 home win to improve
to 5-0-2. Yesterday, Michigan showed no
signs of inexperience as it overcame an
early 2-0 deficit to tie Michigan State 3-
3 at Yost Ice Arena.
"All of the freshmen came in from
programs that were very intense," head
coach Hal Krenkel said of his team's
rapid development. "They knew how to
play already. They were used to this level
of play. Also, the upperclassmen are
always around to hang out with the
freshmen, which has helped a lot for
team chemistry."
Anyone who followed this team last
season might have expected more of a
letdown this year. The Wolverines fin-
ished 30-2-3 on the way to winning their
league and finishing fifth at the national
championships last spring. But gradua-
tion forced Michigan to bring in a lot of
new faces this season.
"The freshmen came in with a lot
more skill than we ever anticipated," sen-
ior Stacey Kilarski said, one of the
team's two leading scorers through eight
games. "They are all really good skaters,
really good stick-handlers. And'we're
finally joining as a team - everyone is
getting to know each other."
Unlike a varsity program, the.
women's hockey club is coached by stu-
dents. Krenkel, who also coached the
team last season, is a junior in the Divi-

sion of Kinesiology. He began with the
program as a volunteer assistant during
his freshman year. The team's assistant
coach, Gordie Scott, is a freshman in
LS&A.
"I think it's helped to have a student
as a coach because he knows the pres-
sures of school as well as hockey,"
Kilarsky said.
Said Krenkel: "In the beginning I
thought (being the same age as the play-
ers) would be a little weird, but after the
first week or so it was clear that they still
have the same respect for me that they
would for an older coach. I can also
relate to them a lot more than an older
person could, being in school and under-
standing that they have classes. Besides
that, I don't think there's a real difference
between me and someone older."
The women's game is a little different
than men's hockey because checking is
not allowed. But despite the differences
in rules, the intensity is still high.
"Because there's no checking, you
don't have to keep your head up as much
in women's hockey," Krenkel said.
"Women's hockey is a little less physi-
cal than men's. It's more of a finesse
game with faster stick-handling and a lit-
tle faster skating," Kilarski said.
Despite the team's undefeated record
thus far in 2001, Krenkel still sees room
for improvement.
r "We're playing well right now but
we're playing a lot better in practice,"
Krenkel said. "As soon as we start play-
ing as well as we do in practice, this
team is really going to come together"
The Wolverines are hoping to continue
to come together during a pair of games
on the road next weekend.

Why: Catherine Foreman scored the game winning goal in the regional final
of the NCAA Tournament in a 2-1 win over Michigan State. The goal came
with 9:54 remaining in the first overtime. The win put Michigan into the
Final Four where they will play Kent State next weekend.
Foreman
SeorsBRIEFS

AP 1PHOTO
Detroit Lions quarterback Charlie Batch is sacked by Tampa Bay Buccaneers
defensive tackle Warren Sapp. Batch was sacked five times in the 20-17 loss.
Monday, Nov. 12
M Tennis at Big Ten Singles Championships (East Lansing)
Friday, Nov. 16
W Swim/Diving at Michigan State Invitational, 5 p.m.
M Basketball vs. Oakland, 7 p.m.
Volleyball at Penn State, 7:30 p.m.
W Basketball at Louisiana Tech, 8 p.m.
Ice Hockey at Nebraska Omaha, 8:05 p.m.
W Swim/Diving at Eastern Michigan Invitational, TBA
W Soccer at NCAA Tournament First Round (Campus Sites)
Field Hockey at NCAA Tournament Semifinals (Kent, Ohio)
Saturday, Nov. 17
W Swim/Diving at Michigan State Invitational, 9 a.m.
Football at Wisconsin, 3:30 p.m.
Volleyball at Ohio State, 7 p.m.
Ice Hockey at Nebraska Omaha, 8:05 p.m.
W Swim/Diving at Eastern Michigan Invitational, TBA
Wrestling at Michigan State Open (unattached)
Sunday. Nov.18
W Basketball at Detroit, 4 p.m.
Field Hockey at NCAA Tournament Final (Kent, Ohio)
W Soccer at NCAA Tournament Second Round (Campus Sites)
Wrestling at Michigan State Open (unattached)
DAILY 3OREAGAD

Former Red Wing,
Fetisov makes HOF
TORONTO (AP) - Viacheslav Feti-
sov, Mike Gartner, Dale Hawerchuk and
Jari. Kurri represent one of the most
impressive slates of Hockey Hall of
Fame inductees in recent memory.
Pittsburgh general manager Craig
Patrick enters in the builder category
Monday night, along with Eric Duhat-
shek of Calgary for distinguished hock-
ey journalism and longtime Penguins
voice Mike Lange for broadcasting.
The additions increase membership
to 226 players, 89 builders and 68-
media.
Fetisov, 43, joins Vladislav Tretiak as
the only Russians in the hall. Fetisov, an
assistant coach with the New Jersey
Devils, will coach the Russian team at
the 2002 Winter Olympics. He helped
the Soviet Union win two Olympic
titles and six world championships, and
was considered by many to be the best
defenseman in the world in the 1980s.
He joined the Devils in 1989 after
barriers to pro hockey fell in his home-
land, and helped the Detroit Red Wings
win the Stanley Cup in 1997 and in
1998.
"I've learned a lot about Gordie
Howe, Ted Lindsay and Maurice
Richard," Fetisov said. "To be in the
same category and mentioned with
them is a great, great, great achieve-
ment for me and a great honor."
U.S. qualifies to play
in 2002 World Cup
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Trinidad (AP) -
With qualifying over, the U.S. soccer
team turned its attention to the World
Cup draw on Dec. 1 and to next year's
tournament in Japan and South Korea.
"Now we can get on with the busi-
ness of preparing for the World Cup,"
U.S. coach Bruce Arena said yesterday
after the Americans, their berth already
secure, completed qualifying with a
scoreless tie against Trinidad and Toba-
go.
"Obviously, the conditions were dif-
ficult out there with the heat and the

humidity," Arena said. "It was a pretty
even game. I think the result was fair
for both teams."
The Americans clinched their fourth
straight trip to the World Cup on Oct. 7
when they beat Jamaica 2-1 at
Foxboro, Mass., as Trinidad upset Hon-
duras and Mexico was held to a tie by
Costa Rica.
At this same stadium 12 years ago,
the United States qualified for its first
World Cup in 40 years, winning 1-0 on
a 30-yard, 30th-minute goal by Paul
Caligiuri, who retired from profession-
al soccer on Oct. 27.
The game drew just 5,000 to Hasley
Crawford Stadium and helped raise
money for Marvin Lee, a Trinidad and
Tobago player who was paralyzed from
the neck down following an on-field
collision against the United States on
March 20 in a qualifier for the FIFA
World Under-20 Championship.
Jordan declares his
worst shooting night
WASHINGTON (AP) - Michael
Jordan missed his first 14 shots on the
way to his first four-game losing
streak in 11 1/2 years. By the end of
the game, all he could do was laugh at
his own misery.
Jordan scored a season-low 16
points - making just five of 26 shots
- as the Washington Wizards lost to
the Seattle SuperSonics 99-84 Sunday.
"It was probably one of the worst
shooting nights I've had in my career,"
Jordan said. "I had great shots."
Among Jordan's misses were an
easy alley-oop, which he decided not
to dunk, two reverse layups, and an
open jumper that Brent Barry practi-
cally dared him to shoot. When Jordan
made his first field goal, a tip-in with
4:17 remaining in the third quarter,
the fans gave him a long standing ova-
tion.
By the fourth quarter, Jordan was
shaking his head and laughing as his
own shooting and his teammates'
assorted bloopers. He saved his seri-
ous words for official Leroy Richard-
son, who gave Jordan a technical with
19 seconds to play.

Women rugby club
gets dirty ,and bloody

By Josh Holman
Daily Sports Writer

If the women's rugby club finds an
injured teammate on the field, they fol-
jtow one guideline: bring them water.
In a club sport where concussions are
referred to as a "common occurrence"
and on-site medical trainers do not
-exist, no one questions this team's
toughness.
The Michigan women's rugby club
has already scrummed its way through
its fall season and now awaits the start of
the spring season. This past season, with
a relatively young team, the Wolverines
just failed to make it out of districts. But
the members of the team treated their
finish as a success with the amount of
new players they've attracted to the field.
In a physically exhausting "men's"
sport where aggression and injuries run
high, recruiting enough players for the
season can often be a challenge in itself.
"A lot of girls think about it and don't
want to get hit or don't want to get
hurt," club president Lindsey Vastola
said. "But once you play your first
game you stick with it."
Along with youth, the team is also
dealing with a significant lack of size.
The women often find themselves com-
peting against opposition as tall as 5-
foot-8 with a 200-pound build, whereas
the average weight on their team is
around 160 pounds and the tallest girl
tops out at 5-foot-7.
The challenge the team faces against
the difference in these numbers often
serves as another source of motivation.
"When you have six-foot girls com-
ing at you and you tackle them and hear
them hit the ground, it's a great rush of
adrenaline,"Vastola said.
When opposing forces this large
come face to face, injuries are bound to
occur. Vastola herself has played with

two broken ribs and a bad case of asth-
ma. It is this passion for the sport that
will often drive the players to play
through their injuries.
Senior Sarah Price played with one of
the more serious injuries the team can
remember in recent history. She was
involved in a play where a tackle on an
opposing player led to a head-on colli-
sion. Both ended up with large gashes
in the head.
"I actually didn't realize I'd split my
head open," Price said. "I just thought
I'd knocked the wind out of myself. I
was lying on the ground just trying to
catch my breath."
Price required eight stitches in her
head and was actually back on the field
for the next game.
"I just put a bunch of gauze around
my head," Price said. "I looked like I'd
been to war with a huge head wound
but I played and it was fine."
Even after watching their team'mates
succumb to the physical prices of the
game, very few are willing to step off
the field when they know they should.
Whatever it is that drives them to play
through the pain, they believe it is a
cathartic relief.
"It's such an adrenaline rush," Vastola
said. "Basically rugby for me is a way
to get all my aggression and anger out
legally."
This apparent reduction in stress is a
realization all rugby players reach at
some point. It is probably one of the
bonds that brings them together as
friends and not enemies from different
sides of the field when each game ends.
"Someone described to me once that
on the field it's war," Price said. "But
afterwards you get off the field and you
party with your opponents. It's tradition
for the home team to host a party for the
visiting team after each game."

NHL STANDINGS

NFL STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
NY Islanders 11
NY Rangers 11
Philadelphia 8
New Jersey 8
Pittsburgh 6

L
3
7
5
4
7

T RT Pts GF
1 1 24 49
1 0 23 54
3 0 19 47
1 1 18 40
2 2 16 34
T RT Pts GF
2 2 22 50
1 0 19 50
3 2 19 36
2 1 17 38
1 1 1.6 46

Northeast Division
Toronto
Ottawa
Boston
Montreal
Buffalo
Southeast Division
Carolina
Washington
Tampa Bay
Florida
Atlanta

W
9
9
7
7
7
W
10
6
5
4
3

L
4
6
5
7
8

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division

Detroit
Chicago
St. Louis
Nashville
Columbus
Northwest Division
Calgary
Edmonton
Minnesota
Colorado
Vancouver
Pacific Division
San Jose
Phoenix
Dallas
Anaheim
Los Angeles

W
14
12
9
5
3
W
12
11
6
7
7
W
8
6
5
5
5

L T RT Pts GF
6 2 2 24 49
9 2 0 14 39
9 1 1 12 30
8 2 2 12 34
101 2 9 29
L T RT Pts GE
3 0 1 29 58
4 3 0 27 61
4 3 0 25 47
102 0 12 40
104 0 10 31
L T RT Pts GF
2 1 2 27 51
5 2 1 25 51
6 3 1 16 43
101 0 15 37
11 1 0 15 52

GA
35
55
35
36
43
GA
39
38
37
45
42
GA
50
44
39
46
60
GA
42
48
36
49
50
GA
33
36
51
41
54
GA
43
41
48
43
45

Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Tennessee
Jacksonville
Western Division
Oakland
San Diego
Denver
Seattle
Kansas City

W
6
5
4
4
3
3
W
6
5
4
3
2

AMERICAN CONFERENCE
Eastern Division
W
Miami 6
NY Jets 6
New England 5
Indianapolis 4
Buffalo 1
Central Division

NATIONAL CONFERENCE
Eastern Division

T Pct.
0 .750
0 .667
0 .556
o .52o
0 .125
T Pct.
o .750
0 .625
0 .500
0 .500
0 .429
o .375
T Pct.
0 .857
0 .625
o .50
0 .429
O .222
T Pct.
0 .571
0 .500
0 .375
0 .286
o .250
T Pct.
o .750
O .750
0 .500
0 .429
0 .000
T Pct.
0 .875
0 .714
0 .571
0 .5oo
0 .111

PF PA
180 161
184 182
206 171
224 224
133 216
PF PA
135 90
141 129
133 166
144 133
129 180
144 128
PF PA
189 133
206 146
192 182
118 158
171 199
PF PA
145 98
148 140
111 193
99 166
129 167
PF PA
174 115
188 117
159 136
138 165
127 217
PF PA
255 129
174 155
148 134
155 164
132 217

Philadelphia
NY Giants
Washington
Arizona
Dallas
Central Division
Chicago
Green Bay
Tampa Bay
Minnesota
Detroit
Western Division
St. Louis
SanLFrancisco
New Orleans
Atlanta
Carolina

W
4
4
3
2
2
W
6
6
4
3
0
W
7
5
4
4
1

Blue takes Chicago
The Chicago Bears are experiencing their first winning season in years
despite yesterday's 20-12 loss to Green Bay. Two of Michigan's high profile
players last year in AnthonyfThomas and David Terrell have made significant
contributions to the Bears' winning ways.
Anthony Thomas Chicago RB
Thomas has amassed over 625 yards rushing and 4 touch-
downs this season but was shut down yesterday by the
Packer defense for only 45 yards rushing along with 45
yards receiving.
David Terrell Chicago WR
Terrell scored two touchdowns in the final 4:08 two weeks David
ago that sent Chicago's game against San Francisco into Terrell
overtime. Yesterday's performance against Green Bay
resulted in three receptions for 12 yards.
Lions still1 struggling'

10

L
4
6
6
8
9

T RT Pts GF
4 2 22 50
3 2 17 35
4 3 17 40
3 0 15 40
1 2 13 43

NHL GAMES
Yesterday's games
Edmonton 1, CAROLINA 1 (OT)
Vancouver 5, MINNESOTA 0
NY RANGERS 3, Montreal 2
CHICAGO 3, San Jose 2
Dallas 2, ANAHEIM 2
Today's game
Buffalo at FLORIDA, 7:30 P.M.

to find winning ways

COMMTERAA
C O M N U T E Rf
EXPRESS
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Required Arp r
Prepaid tickets LSe vc
availaUble

A look at the
underside of U of M

NFL GAMES
Yesterday's games
ATLANTA 20, Dallas 13
Green Bay 20, CHICAGO 12
Pittsburgh 15, CLEVELAND 12 (OT)
Tampa Bay 20, DETROIT 17
Miami 27, INDIANAPOLIS 24
JACKSONVILLE 30, Cincinnati 13
NEW ENGLAND 21, Buffalo 11
NY JETS 27, Kansas City 7
ST. Louis 48, Carolina 14
DENVER 26, San Diego 16
NY Giants 17, ARIZONA 10
PHILADELPHIA 48, Minnesota 17
SAN FRANCISCO 28, New Orleans 27
Oakland at SEATTLE,iNc
Today's game
Baltimore at TENNESSEE, 9 P.M.
Next week's games
Seattle at BUFFALO, 1 P.M.
Tennessee at CINCINNATI, 1 P.M.
Philadelphia at DALLAS. 1 P.M.
Atlanta at GREEN BAY, 1 P.M.
NY Jets at MIAMI, 1 P.M.
Indianapolis at NEW ORLEANS, 1 P.M.
San Francisco at CAROLINA, 1 P.M.
Cleveland at BALTIMORE, 1 P.M.
Jacksonville AT PITTSBURGH, 4:05 P.M.
San Diego AT OAKLAND, 4:05 P.M.
Washington AT DENVER, 4:15 P.M.
Chicago AT TAMPA BAY, 4:15 P.M.
Detroit AT ARIZONA, 4:15 P.M. i

PONTIAC (AP) - Warren Sapp had
called yesterday's game against the win-
less Detroit Lions the most important of
his seven-year career with Tampa Bay.
While the comment drew some
snickering, the Lions certainly kept the
game close and the Buccaneers needed
Martin Gramatica's 35-yard field goal
with four seconds left to secure a 20-17
victory.
"If we lost to an 0-7 team, where is
the morale of the team?" Sapp asked.
"All the nuts and the bolts could've
came out if we fell flat here in Detroit,
no doubt about it"
The Buccaneers are 4-4 for the fourth
straight year, while the 0-8 Lions
remained the NFL's lone winless team
and are off to their worst start since
going 0-11 in 1942.
"The last five games have been
extremely close," said Detroit coach
Marty Mornhinweg, who has seen the
Lions lose those five by an average of
4.6 points. "The good teams win those
games. Not all of them, but many of
them."
While yesterday's game couldn't
compare to Tampa Bay's loss to St.
Louis in the 1999 NFC Championship
game, Sapp insisted on sticking to his
comparison.

.23-yard toss to Warrick Dunn to the
Lions' 26 were the key plays.
"To get a drive like that was impor-
tant," Tampa Bay coach Tony Dungy
said. "Hopefully, that'll get us some
momentum in the second half of the
year."
After starting 3-4 the past two sea-
sons, Tampa Bay advanced to the play-
offs by winning seven of the final nine
games last season and eight of nine in
1999.
"The past has nothing to do with this
year," Tampa Bay's Derrick Brooks
said.

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After missing chances to score a late
go-ahead or tying touchdown the previ-
ous four weeks, Detroit tied the game at
17 when Charlie Batch found a wide-
open Reuben Droughns for an 8-yard
touchdown.
But the Lions' defense could not pre-
vent Tampa Bay from driving down the
field relatively easily.
Detroit's Ron Rice compared Sun-
day's defeat to last year's season-ending
loss to Chicago, which knocked the
Lions out of the playoffs and led to the
hiring of a rookie coach and president:
Mornhinweg and Matt Millen.
"I'd almost rather lose by 50 points
than to lose like that," Rice said. "That

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