100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 09, 2001 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2001-11-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

10B - The Michigan Daily - FOOTBALL SATURDAY - Friday, November 9, 2001

S

Friday, November 9, 2001-- FOOTBALI

Dems lose 1 council seat
but still hold 8-3 majority

WHEN MINNESOTA
HAS THE FOOTBALL

After brief respite, Jug

32 Redmon
21 Barber

By Jeff Phillips
Daily Sports Editor

By C. Price Jones
and Louie Meizlish
Daily Staff Reporter
Republicans gained one seat on the
Ann Arbor City Council Tuesday night,
with GOP challenger Michael Reid
edging out Democratic Councilwoman
Joan Lowenstein by a 1.5 percent mar-
gin. It was Lowenstein's first election
since her appointment to the 2nd Ward
seat last year.
Reid, a portfolio manager, attributed
the win to his experience with bud-
getary issues as the city is forced to
work with a smaller budget. He and fel-
low Republicans, including former
Mayor Ingrid Sheldon, celebrated last
night at Cleveland's Gill and Grill on
Main Street.
"A lot of people realized that budget
issues are real important and I have a lot
of experience in that," he said.
He also said his opposition to acces-
sory apartments - extra apartments
built onto houses - put him over the
top.
Residents were "concerned it would
change the character of the city," he
said.
Democrat Robert Johnson of the 1st
Ward and Republican Marcia Higgins
of the 4th Ward easily won re-election,
while 3rd Ward Councilwoman Heidi
Cowing Herrell and 5th Ward incum-
bent Wendy Ann Woods, both
nmcnrratg ran nnnnnozed
Democrats now hold an 8-3 majority
on the council, including Mayor John
Hieftje. Five of the 10 seats are up for
election each year.
Lowenstein, who waited out the close

An Aoi CiyC~~i
~..::.
election in the 2nd Ward with fellow
Democrats at Arbor Brewing Company
on Washington Street, promised to
remain active in local affairs.
Democrats crossed their fingers as they
waited for the results from the ward's
final precinct to come in. But the net
two-vote gain she received in that
precinct was not enough to overcome
Reid's lead.
"A lot of other politicians have lost
elections and gone on to win other
ones," she said.
University of Michigan College
Democrats Chair Eric Feldman said stu-
dents could have delivered the close
election to Lowenstein.
"A heavily Republican ward could
have turned Democratic if we had had
higher student turnout," he said.
In the 1st Ward, Johnson defeated
Republican challenger Scott Wojack, 77
percent to 22 percent.
Johnson pledged to "build relation-
ships with the surrounding townships"

and deal with the economics concern-
ing lower income housing. "We're
going to have to deal with the econom-
ic climate," he said. "This is not an issue
people are going to want to deal with."
Wojack, who also suffered a loss in
last year's 52nd District state House
election, said he did well for a heavily
Democratic ward. He hopes to work
with the city to increase student voter
turnout and promote renewable energy.
"I would like to see the city move to
half of the people using renewable ener-
gy," he said. "It may take time to work
with the community and share my
ideas."
In the 4th Ward, challenger Michael
Nowak failed in his attempt to give the
Green Party its first council member,
losing by about 36 percent. Nowak had
hoped that without a Democrat running
in the race, he would have a better
chance at defeating Republican incum-
bent Higgins.
"I am very pleased to serve the con-
stituents of the 4th Ward," Higgins said
last night. She said she would work to
"remove barriers" to making housing in
the city more affordable.
"We're pleased that the Green Party
is making progress," Nowak said.
"We've tripled our numbers since the
last election."
Nowak was satisfied with the turnout
after the Green Party's second year on
the ballet. He plans to work on increas-
ing voter turnout among students and
has not decided if he will run again.
"The University of Michigan is real
strong in terms of social justice," he
said. "The Green Party really fits in
with their views."

18 Burns
17 Patterson
WR
77 Anderle 69Ccarter
76 McIntosh 67 McElroy

8 Abdul-Khaliq
4 Henderson
Johnson
W R
6s ni iQ 51 Aesw.i 75 Kuppe
70 Nicholson 70 Quinn 74 Melander

3 Johnson
1 Matthews
WR
82 Utecht
88 Baugus
TE

RT
SCB
21 LeSueur
12 B. Williams

RG

C

LG

LT

DE
92 Rumishek
13 Stevens
OLB
6 Hobson
42 Spytek

'k

NT
90 Heuer
67 Pearson

DT
97 Lazarus
99 Frysinger

CB
3 Howard
30 M. Curry

RLB
~~?i53 Orr
*ij 5 Kasham

37 Ka ; :

SS
26 Curry
22 Shaw

FS
24 Drake
2 June

mmwmwi

MINNESOTA ROSTER

University students Paxton Williams, Brenda Abdelall and Ben Perry are featured on
the cover of this week's issue of Newsweek.
'U' featured i*n cover
story of Ne wsweek

- -1

Good Food,.
Good Drinks,
Good Prices... '
Good Time Charley's After 11 P.M.

Every night from 11p.m. until close, Charley's features...
Pitchers ......................$3.50
Bud Light, Molson, Killian's, or Honey Brown
Margaritas . ....................$2.25
Regular or Strawberry Margaritas
eer..... ..............$2.25
22 oz. Bud Light, Molson, Killian's, or Honey Brown
Iced Teas . ...... ..........$3.25
All of our Iced Tea varieties, 22oz.
Also featured after 11p.m. is a limited menu of appetizers,
burgers, and sandwiches at special midnight hour prices.
Good Time Charley's
1140 South University at Church 668-8411

By Elizabeth Kassab
Daily Staff Reporter
In an article tagging the nation's col-
lege students as "Generation 9-11,"
Newsweek Magazine's Nov. 12 cover
story focuses on the University commu-
nity's actions in the wake of the unprece-
dented events of the last two months. The
issue went on sale nationwide Monday.
Newsweek Senior Editor." Barbara
Kantrowitz said the University's diverse
environment was a major factor in her
selection of the school for the article. The
University's students are ethnically
diverse, and they are studying many dif-
ferent things, Kantrowitz said. She added
that the University's significant numbers
of Jewish, Arab and Muslim students
made it ideal.
"I've just always thought it was a great
school," she said. "I think there are a lot
of smart students there, and I just wanted
to know what they were thinking at a
time when very few of us know what to
think.
LSA senior Brenda Abdelall, presi-
dent of the University's Arab Student
Association, was interviewed for the arti-
cle and appears on the magazine's cover.
"I think the article did a pretty good
job of depicting the way our lives have
been shaped and changed by September
11," she said. "I think it's great that they.
came to the University of Michigan cam-
pus because we did have a lot of activism
after September 11.'
Abdelall also noted the vigils, teach-
ins and protests that have taken place on

"I just wanted to know
what they were
thinking at a time when
very few of us know
what to think. "
- Barbara Kantrowitz
Newsweek senior editor
campus this semester.
Abdelall said she feels the article
encompassed a wide variety of view-
points, relating the experiences of many
campus groups. The Greek system, the
Michigan Marching Band, the Arab and
Muslim communities and ROTC are
among those represented in the article.
Rackham student Paxton Williams,
who also appears o the Newsweek
cover, said the University provided a
unique perspective on the aftermath of
Sept. 11.
"I think it is very important for the
mass media to look at how September 11
is affecting all aspects of society
including students," he said.
Kantrowitz said that at the University,
she found a generation of students who
are handling themselves differently than
their parents did during the Vietnam War.
"What made me feel good was the
high level of thoughtfulness and commit-
ment on the part of the students,"
Kantrowitz said. "I feel the country will
be in good hands."

1 Keith Matthewsr
2 Jack Brewer f
2 Zack Kartak F
3 Ron Johnson w
4 Antoine Henderson%
5 Damian Cannaday%
5 Joe Weber F
5 Dominique SimsF
6 Jimmy Henry L
7 Travis Cole
8 Asad Abdul-Khaliq(
9 Nathaniel WalkerL
11 Matt Poreba r
11 Jarod Posthumus(
12 Justin Fraley t
13 Ken Williams I
14 Preston GrueningI
15 Jermaine Mays 1
16 Andy Merrill t
16 Clarence Woods
17 Tony Patterson 1
18 Antoine Burns
19 Benji Kamrath t
20 Jubril Akinwale1
21 Marion Barber 1
23 Terry Jackson I
24 Danny Upchurch1
?5 Ukee Dozier t
26 Derrick Saunderst
27 Eli Ward:
28 Dan Nystrom 1
30 Jonathan Richmond
31 Phil Archer 1
32 Tellis Rdmond 1
32 Mike Wojciechowski
33 Renato Fitzpatrick1
33 Justin Isom
34 Diamos DemerrittI
34 Steve Murray I
36 Denetrus Johnson
38 Matthew Bass 1
39 Jason Beckum 1
39 Mike Lehan
41 Eric Stenzel 1
43 Darrell Reid 1
44 Thomas Tapeh 1
46 Tony Dupree 1
47 Paul Nixon I

6-2
6-1
5-9
6-3
5-8
5-11
6-0
6-1
6-0
6-3
6-0
5-8
6-0
6-4
6-0
6-1
5-10
6-0
6-3
5-11
6-3
6-1
6-3
6-1
5-11
5-11
5-9
6-1
5-10
6-0
5-11
5-10
6-2
6-0
5-8
6-0
5-8
5-11
5-8
5-9
6-0
6-0
6-0
6-4
6-3
6-1
6-2
6-1

194
190
174
217
167
188
191
200
200
205
201
170
198
215
196
175
201
190
218
176
201
193
207
206
195
185
170
180
160
199
200
183
233
192
178
201
174
197
178
174
170
186
184
253
238
228
248
209

47 Justin Waldron .I
48 Austin Osei t
49 Jerry Macken i
50 Greg White t
51 Akeem Akinwalet
52 Kyle McKenzie I
52 Jeff Norton t
52 Ben West t
53 Bradley Vance I
55 Charlton Keith I
57 Peter Prudden t
58 Terrance CampbellI
59 Dan Gitlewski t
59 Sam Logan
60 Mike Nicholson
61 Timothy Ward I
62 Morgan Kirkland
64 Ryan Domin [
64 Rob Kraemer
65 Jason Green
66 Ryan Roth
67 Mark McElroy t
68 Derek Burns t
69 Jeremiah Carter
71 Richard Ellman t
74 Brandon Hall t
75 Jake Kuppe t
76 Matt McIntosh t
77 Matt Anderle t
78 Rickey Wymer t
79 Trevor McCullocht
79 Joseph Quinn t
81 Dustin Braun
81 Zach Vevea 1
82 Ben Utecht
83 Jared Ellerson
84 Rian Melander
85 Chad Redmann
86 Jakari Wallace
87 Dan Kwapinski 1
88 Scooter Baugus
91 Jerry Barnes I
95 Kason Love I
95 Brandon Harston1
97 Mark Losli 1
98 Keith Lipka 1
99 Damian Haye I

216
230
238
259
270
220
274
233
211
220
240
185
295
220
285
285
280
273
285
246
313
291
281
291
278
270
352
295
316
321
300
292
224
267
242
181
240
237
170
278
248
230
260
307
240
265
245

After a two year layoff, Michigan
(4-1 Big Ten, 6-2 overall) will
resume its battle for the Little Brown
Jug with Minnesota (1-4, 3-5) this
Saturday.
This once-balanced rivalry has lost
some of its luster with the fans in the
past half-century, since the
Wolverines began dominating the
series. Michigan has won 29 of the
last 31 meetings and holds an all-
time advantage in the series at 63-
23-3.
Nevertheless, the hype is not lost
on coach Lloyd Carr.
"We are looking forward to play-
ing for the oldest trophy in college
football, the Little Brown Jug, and it
has great value to our program," Carr
said.
But it may not have the same
meaning to Minnesota, which not
only hasn't had the Little Brown Jug
in the last 12 chances, but it also
plays for three other rivalry trophies.
"Obviously that Minnesota versus
Michigan for the Little Brown Jug
was a big thing at one time," Mason
said. "I think once the rivalry
becomes lopsided - which it has -
I think maybe the rivalry is dimin-
ished to a certain extent, especially
when you take into account at
Minnesota we've got a lot of builtin
rivalries, we play for a lot of trophies
- probably more trophies than any-
body."
The Gophers nearly pulled off the
upset in the their last mtchup in
Minneapolis, when a Tom Brady-led
Michigan squad fell behind 10-7 in
the first quarter, but came back to
win 15-10 in a defensively dominat-
ed game.
If Minnesota expects to defeat the
Wolverines this year, it will have to
rely on its rushing game, which is
second in the Big Ten at 240.5 yards
per game. Michigan retained the No.
1 rushing defense in the country,
despite allowing 211 yards to
Michigan State's T.J. Duckett last
week. But Mason still expects the
Wolverines to be tough on the
ground game.
"A lot of times guys change their
opinions on things based on one per-
formance," Mason said. "Michigan
didn't become a good team against
the rush overnight, nor will they dis-
appear being a good team against the
rush overnight. I'm expecting a team
in Michigan that will be extremely
tough to run against."
Last week, the Spartans neutral-
ized the Michigan linebackers by
spreading the field and forcing the
Wolverines to commit to the pass.
The Gophers aren't as talented at
wide receiver or quarterback as the
Spartans, but Carr expects
Minnesota to challenge the
Wolverines' secondary.
"They are like a lot of teams that
have an outstanding ability to run in
the sense they are going to make you
put eight or nine guys on the line,
and then they throw the ball to (Ron)
Johnson on the outside. It's not com-

Larry Foote attacked Jeff Smoker all afterr

plicated, but it's effective." Carr saic
The game has bowl implication
for both teams as Michigan will tr
to retain the lead in the Big Ten an
the Gophers will try to win thei
remaining games to finish with
chance to go to a bowl for the fourtl
consecutive year. Minnesota faces
tough road in its remaining game!
and coach Glen Mason is realisti
about his team's chances.

0

i!

- A

Subs* Party Subs * Frozen Y
-------------------------
1/0 Off
any Party Sub or Catering Order
Not valid with any other discount. Valid at
participating stores only. Please present
coupon before ordering. One offer per
coupon per person. Jumbos extra.
Offer expires 11V30/01

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan