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November 05, 2001 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 2001-11-05

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2B - The Michigan Daily - SportsMonday - November 5, 2001

CLUBSPOIRTSWEEKLY
FdieejoksK fin reopeeauteti tmat /riber
Form ecsfn creative outlet in ultimate frisbee

ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

By Josh Holman
For the Daily
It's true that most of the athletes
on Michigan's ultimate frisbee club
started out with little exposure to the
game, but that doesn't mean they
treat it like a day in the park.
"I had some ideas about what I
thought ultimate was," said senior
Joe Bernard. "I thought it was just a
bunch of guys running around with
dogs. But the level we try to play on
is very serious. There is lots of train-
ing, -and we have a lot of real ath-
letes out here."
Bernard fits the general profile of
many of the students who take up
ultimate when they arrive on cam-
pus. He was a former athlete who
was trying to find a way to stay in
shape.
"Almost everyone out here has
played some sort of high school
sport, whether it be track or soccer,"
club president Dave Pohl said. "But
'M'sCuEULE

only about one or two guys played
ultimate frisbee competitively in
high school.
"Most people start not knowing
much about the game."
While Bernard was a baseball
player, a number of soccer players
have stumbled across the similarities
between ultimate frisbee and their
former sport.
Much like soccer, the game is in
continuous motion and the
endurance factor always plays a role.
The general appeal of the sport is
very apparent on campus. Intramural
and pick-up games are a frequent
occurrence on any patch of grass
that can be found;
The popularity has greatly helped
the club team.
Each fall to club team opens up
clinics to anyone who shows the
faintest interest. The numbers have
swelled large enough in recent years
that the team found it necessary to
slice itself up into "A" and "B"

teams.
The increased popularity the sport
has seen at Michigan in the past five
years has given the team a chance to
take the program to a national level.
The "A" team is composed of only
those who treat the sport with the
proper intensity needed to field a
competitive team.
The commitment is paying off.
The team has advanced to the
national tournament the past three
years, placing eighth this past sea-
son.
Pohl is happy with the club's
recent success, and is hoping for
more in the future.
"In the past we've always hoped to
win regionals and make it to nation-
als," Pohl said. "Now that we've
done that the past few years, we
hope to go all the way."
Pohl is a veteran on the team and
is expected to be one of the team's
captains along with Mike Haley.
This leadership is, in a way, the

breath of the team.
The energy they emit trickles
down to anyone toying with a com-
mitment to the sport.
"The leaders on the team need to
be very fiery and extremely compet-
itive," Bernard said. "That will really
charge up the younger guys and get
them into the game."
The veterans on the team, past and
present, must be doing something
right.
They've already managed to pro-
duce a nationally-prominent team in
just a few years and are striving for
that extra amount of respect the
sport doesn't seem to get.
They even manage to get the ath-
letes out for a few weekend practices
in the dead of winter.
"To be honest, I don't know how
much we get done in those prac-
tices," Bernard said. "Your fingers
are so cold you can't even hold the
disc. It's just more fun than any-
thing."

Who: Josh Blackburn
Hometown: Choctaw, Okla.

Sport: Hockey
Year: Senior

Why: Blackburn stonewalled the opposition this weekend, allowing just
one goal in the two game series against Alaska-Fairbanks. He is now just
one shutout shy of the school record, which was set i y Marty Turco in
1997.

Blackburn

SPORTS BLRLFS

Thursday, Nov. 8
W Soccer vs. Michigan State at Big Ten Tournament quarterfinals (West
Lafayette), 1:45 p.m.
M Soccer at Big Ten Tournament First Round (Madison), 2:30 p.m.
Friday, Nov. 9
W Basketball vs. Latvia RTU Clondica, 7 p.m. (exhibition)
W Soccer at Big Ten Tournament Semifinals (West Lafayette), 1 p.m.
M Soccer at Big Ten Tournament Semifinals (Madison), 3:30 p.m.
Saturday. Nov. 10
Football vs. Minnesota, 12:10 p.m.
Volleyball vs. Northwestern, 7 p.m.
M Tennis at Big Ten Singles Championships (East Lansing)
M Cross Country at NCAA Great Lakes Regional (Terre Haute, Ind.), 11 a.m.
W Cross Country at NCAA Great Lakes Regional (Terre Haute, Ind.), Noon
Rowing vs. Eastern Michigan, 8 a.m.
Sunday Nov.11
M Basketball vs. Nike Elite, 2 p.m. (exhibition)
W Soccer at Big Ten Tournament Championship (West Lafayette), 1 p.m.
M Soccer at Big Ten Tournanent Championship (Madison), 3 p.m.
Field Hockey at NCAA Regional Final (Campus Sites)
M Tennis at Big Ten Singles Championships (East Lansing)
Runnin' down the dream

Marlins exec will be
Tigers' new president
DETROIT (AP) - The Detroit
Tigers are expected to hire Florida Mar-
lins executive Dave Dombrowski as
president, a source close to the situation
told The Associated Press on Sunday.
The source, speaking on condition of
anonymity, also said Tigers general
manager Randy Smith and manager
Phil Gamer would keep their jobs. Both
have two years remaining on their con-
tracts.
The announcement is expected early
this week.
"We may have some things to say
tomorrow," Dombrowski said in a tele-
phone interview from his Florida home
last night. "Anything I would say
tonight would be preliminary."
Steve Copses, a spokesman for the
Marlins, said the team would have no
comment.
Dombrowski, the Marlins' president
and general manager, would be replac-
ing Tigers owner Ake Ilitch, who
appointed himself team president when
John McHale left the Tigers for the
Tampa Bay Devil Rays.
Dombrowski was a candidate for
similar positions in Toronto and Texas.
The Rangers decided to hire former
Cleveland executive John Hart.
Dombrowski is widely regarded as
one of baseball's top executives. He has
two years left on a five-year, S5 million
contract, but owner John Henry gave
him permission to talk to the Rangers
and Blue Jays.
Weir wins PGA finale
in four-man playoff
HOUSTON (AP) - Mike Weir sure
knows how to finish off the year in
style.
In a thrilling conclusion to the PGA
Tour season, Weir holed a five-foot
birdie putt to win the Tour Champi-
onship on the first hole of a four-man
playoff Sunday, giving the Canadian his
first victory of the season.
It was the second straight year Weir
won the final official event of the PGA
Tour. A year ago, he surged past a
world-class field at Valderrama to win
the American Express Championship.
This one was even sweeter.
Weir, the first foreign player to win
the Tour Championship, closed with a
67 and wound up in the playoff with
hard-charging Ernie Els, the theatrical
Sergio Garcia and PGA champion
David Toms.
Only Weir and Toms hit the fairway
with their tee shots and only Weir had a
decent shot at birdie.
He ended it quickly.

Els, desperate to keep alive his streak
of at least one victory on the PGA Tour
every year since 1994, was seemingly
stuck behind the trees down the 18th
fairway in the playoff when he hit over
the branches to about 40 feet.
His birdie putt grazed the right edge
of the up.

Former Michigan wide receiver David Terrell (83) watches as James Allen (20) catch-
es a deflected Hall, Mary in the final seconds. The Bears won 27-21, in overtime.
Cardiac Bears shock"I

Kenyan triumphs in
New York marathon Browns in OT, 27-21

NEW YORK (AP) - Tesfaye Jifar
won the New York City Marathon in
record time yesterday, pulling away
from his lone challenger with three
miles left in a race dedicated to victims
of Sept. 11.
Jifar ran the 26.2 miles in 2 hours, 7
minutes, 43 seconds to become the first
Ethiopian to win the race. He broke the
12-year-old mark of 2:08:01 set by Tan-
zania's Juma Ikangaa.
The women's winner also set a race
record. Margaret Okayo of Kenya won
in 2:24:21, trimming 19 seconds off the
mark set by Australia's Lisa Ondieki in
1992.
Wolverine netters
compete in Toledo
The Michigan men's tennis team
sent three members to Ohio this week-
end to play in the Toledo Rocket Invita-
tional. Sophomores Brett Baudinet and
Anthony Jackson and junior ChriA
Shaya, competed in the three-day
event.
In the A division, Baudinet lost to
Bowling Green senior Vitek Wild, 4-6,
6-2, 6-2. In the consolation bracket, the
Wolverine sophomore rebounded to
defeat Joost Hol of Northwestern.
Jackson also competed in the A divi-
sion, defeating Jimmy McGuire of
Michigan State, 4-6. 6-3, 6-2. But he
lost in the second round to Northwest-
ern's Jackie Jenkins, 6-0, 6-.
Shaya, rebounding from an off-sea-
son wrist injury, advanced to the semi-
finals of the B division by defeating
Wildcat Russell Bennett and Robert
Kurek of DePaul. The results of the
junior's semifinal match were unavail-
able.
In the doubles bracket, Baudinet and
Jackson fell to the Kurek and Andy
Michael of DePaul in a close match, 8-
6.
The Wolverines will head to East
Lansing for the Big Ten Singles Cham-
pionship Nov. 10-12.
- Dan Rosen

CHICAGO (AP) - The ball
popped in the air, Mike Brown
grabbed it and the Chicago Bears won
in overtime.
Again.
Brown returned the interception 16
yards for a game-winning touchdown
for the second straight week as the
Bears stunned Cleveland 27-21 yester-
day for their sixth straight win.
This is one they'll be talking about
for years.
Trailing 21-7, the Bears scored two
touchdowns in the final 28 seconds of
regulation, forcing overtime when
James Allen caught a 34-yard pass
from Shane Matthews that the Browns
(4-3) tried to bat down in the end zone
on the final play.
. As several Browns jumped up to
knock the pass down, Allen caught the
ball as he landed on top of teammate
Marty Booker, sending Soldier Field
into delirium for the second straight
week.
Chicago, which beat the 49ers 37-31
in overtime last Sunday on Brown's
33-yard interception return after trail-
ing by 19 points in the second half,
won the toss in overtime.
The Bears couldn't move, and Brad
Maynard's 52-yard punt pinned the
Browns to their 12.
Tim Couch completed a 16-yard
pass and then was sacked. On a second
down from the 23, Couch's pass was
tipped by Bryan Robinson, and Brown
was there again, carrying the ball 16
yards to the end zone and then all the
way out of the stadium.
The Bears cut the lead to 21-14 on
Matthews' nine-yard pass to Marty

Booker with 28 seconds left; and then
Bobby Howard recovered an onside
kick at the Browns 47 following,
scrum that took awhile to unscramble.
Cleveland looked in control, getting
a fumble return for a touchdown from
Courtney Brown on the second scrim-
mage play of the game, intercepting
three passes and sacking Matthews
five times.
Couch got untracked in the second
half, throwing a pair of touchdown
passes, one a tipped 55-yarder to
Kevin Johnson late in the third quarter.
Cleveland led 14-7 when Couc$
dropped back and threw to the middle
for Johnson. The ball grazed off the
fingers of Brown and went right into
the hands of Johnson, who then beat
Tony Parrish to the end zone with
three minutes left in the quarter.
The Browns moved 57 yards on
their first possession of the second
half.
Gambling on a fourth-and-one fro
the Bears 31, Couch lofted a 28-yar
pass to Quincy Morgan. On the next
play, he found Mike Sellers for a three-k
yard touchdown for a 14-7 lead.
Matthews was clobbered on a blitz
by Wali Rainer on the game's second
scrimmage play, fumbled and Brown
- who'd missed the first six games
with a knee injury- picked the ball up
and rumbled 25 yards for the touchy
down.
Matthews struggled against Cleve-
land's quick defense, throwing inteq
ceptions on the Bears' next two
possessions - one by Earl Little after
the pass was tipped by Gerard Warren
and the second by Brant Boyer.

DAILY SCOREB(AIRD

NFL STANDINGS
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
Eastern Division

NHL STANDINGS

AP PHOTO
A participant in the 32nd New York City Marathon runs in patriotic gear along 4th
Avenue, in the Brooklyn borough of New York yesterday.

Miami
Indianapolis
NY Jets
New England
Buffalo
Central Division
Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Cleveland
Cincinnati
Tennessee
Jacksonville
Western Division
Oakland
San Diego
Denver
Seattle
Kansas City

w
5
4
4
4
1
W
5
4
4
3
2
W
5
5
4
3
2

L
2
3
3
4
6

T
0
0
0
0
0

Pct.
.714
.571
.571
.500
.143

I..

Office of the Registrar
Attention:
Student
Reservists and
National Guard

FZ "
Te Ses J: o::amus
.~

NATIONAL CONFERENCE
Eastern Division
W
NY Giants 4
Philadelphia 4
Washington 3
Arizona 2
Dallas 2

T Pct.
0 .714
0 .625
0 .667
0 .571
0 .429
0 .286
T Pct.
o .833
0 .714
0 .571
0 .500
0 .143
T Pct.
0 .500
0 .500
O .286
0 .333
0 .286
T Pct.
0 .833
0 .714
0 .429
0 .429
0 .000
T Pct.
0 .857
0 .667
O .667
0 .429
0 .125

PF PA
153 137
200 197
141 166
185 160
122 195
PF PA
120 78
141 129
132 118
120 136
129 180
114 115
PF PA
151 105
206 146
164 144
118 158
164 172

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
NY Islanders 6
NY Rangers 4
Philadelphia 3
New Jersey 2
Pittsburgh 2
Northeast Division

Boston
Buffalo
Montreal
Toronto
Ottawa
Southeast Division
Carolina
Washington
Tampa Bay
Atlanta
Florida

TF
1
1
3
0
0

RT Pts GF
1 14 30
0 9 22
0 9 27
1 5 18
1 5 16

PF
148
145
111
99
116

W
4
4
4
4
3
W
4
4
3
1
1

PA
140
98
193
166
147

T RT Pts GF
2 0 10 20
1 1 10 23
1 0 9 20
1 0 9 28
1 0 7 25

GAG
17
26
20'
22
21
GA
14,
22~
18'
25.'
28
GA,
19,
18-
19
260
GA
21
18
22,
23,
20

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
W
Detroit 7
St. Louis 3
Chicago 3
Columbus 1
Nashville 1

T
0
0
0
1
1
TF
0
3
2
4
2

RT Pts GFC
0 14 29
0 9 22
0 8 21
O 6 17
0 4 14

RTI
1
0
0
2
0

Pts GF
9 18
8 24
6 15
5 14
3 14

Central Division
Chicago
Green Bay
Minnesota
Tampa Bay
Detroit
Western Division
St. Louis
New Orleans
San Francisco
Atlanta
Carolina

W
6
5
3
3
0
W
6
4
5
3
1

L
1
2
4
4
7
L
1
2
2
4
7

PF PA
162 95
168 105
138 165
139 119
110 197
PF PA
207 115
139 118
174 155
135 151
118 169

Northwest Division
Edmonton
Calgary
Minnesota
Colorado
Vancouver
Pacific Division
Dallas
Phoenix
San Jose
Los Angeles
Anaheim

W L
6 2
6 1
30
4 3
2 5

T RT Pts GF GA-
1 0 13 30 19,
0 1 13 21 10,
3 1 10 20 17
0 0 8 19 19.
1 0 5 26 28
T RT Pts GF GA
2 1 9 17 18 4
2 0 8 18 20 "
3 1 8 16 20
1 1 6 20 21
1 0 5 15 25

W
3
3
2
2
2

L
2
3
1
4
5

NHL GAMES

NFL GAMES
Yesterday's games
New England 24. ATLANTA 10
Indianapolis 30, BUFFALO 14
GREEN BAY 21, Tampa Bay 20
MIAMI 23, Carolina 6
NY GIANTS 27, Dallas 24 (OT}
Baltimore 13, PITTSBURGH 10

Yesterday's games
CAROLINA 1. PHOENIX 0
Edmonton 2, MINNESOTA 0
Detroit at CHICAGO, INC.
Atlanta at ANAHEIM. INC.
MLB PLAYOFFS
World Series

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