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October 25, 2001 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2001-10-25

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SPORTS

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THURSDAY
OCTOBER 25, 2001

8A

Wolverines fight valiantly, but
fall to Michigan State atJenison

By Charles Paradis
Daily Sports Writer
EAST LANSING - State pride
was at stake when the Michigan vol-
leyball team (6-5 Big Ten, 10-8 over-
all) traveled to face its intrastate rival
Michigan State (5-6, 12-6)
In the
first meet-
ing of the MICHIGAN 1
season, it MICHIGAN ST. 3
took five
games and
an incredible come from behind
effort for Michigan to win, but in
East Lansing it only took four, and
the Wolverines won just a single
game. N
The Wolverines got off to a horren-
dous start as the Spartans grabbed a
11-2 lead without breaking a sweat.
Michigan repeatedly found its attacks
blocked by the Spartans, who record-
ed six kills in game one alone.
But the Wolverines got over their
early game jitters to bring the game
back to 15-10 on Erin Moore's first
kill of the night.
Michigan State again resumed its
dominance and surged out to win the
first game, 30-18. It was a game in
which the Wolverines recorded only
nine kills and committed 10 errors.
"We just fell apart in the first

game," junior Katrina Lehman said.
"I don't even think we played to our
level."
In game two, the Spartans could
not muster the same early superiority
they had achieved in the first game.
Nevertheless, the Wolverines com-
mitted errors early on, which set
them behind 10-7. Then, Michigan
State regained its authority and estab-
lished a 23-13 lead. With a double-
digit advantage, the Spartans did not
need dominance to win. Michigan did
little to help its cause as it committed
three consecutive attack errors to lose
the game 30-15.
This was the third lowest scoring
output by the Wolverines this season
- the other two came against Hawaii
and Wisconsin. Against the Spartans,
Michigan was continually unable to
execute in its system.
"I didn't think we represented what
we were about as a team, in the first
two games very well," coach Mark
Rosen said.
The Wolverines came out of inter-
mission down two games to none to
the Spartans, facing the same dire sit-
uation they had in the first matchup
of the State Pride Series. But the
Wolverines did not have the same
good showing they had had in the
first match and had almost no
momentum to build on.

Michigan has proven so many
times this season that it does not need
momentum to win, just hunger. The
Spartan's dominance disappeared
during the intermission as the
Wolverines grabbed a 12-7 lead, their
largest advantage to that point.
Michigan stepped up its offense
and posted its only positive attack
percentage of the match with an
amazing .471 percentage, which led
to its only win of the night 30-19. A
big part of the Wolverines' offensive
output was generated by Moore. She
tallied six kills in the third game
alone and led Michigan offensively
with 15 kills in the match.
"I just wanted the ball," Moore
said. "And finally in the third game,
it happened."
Could Michigan's miracle come-
back victory at Cliff Keen Arena on
Oct. 3 be repeated on the road? The
Wolverines fought hard to force a
deciding game five, as they overcame
an early Michigan State run to tie
game four at 13.
But the Spartans proved too domi-
nant and seized a 25-20 lead. This
would ultimately prove too much for
the Wolverines, as the Spartans pow-
ered past Michigan 30-22.
"They beat us flat-out, they out-
played us, they outworked us," Moore
said.

DAV
Try as it might, Michigan just couldn't get the ball past Michigan State last night. The Spartans won In four games.

'M' trying to avoid letdown following bye

By Raphael Goodstein
Daily Sports Editor
There are two ways of looking at
a bye week.
On the one hand, a week off can
be beneficial, because it allows
injured players to heal while also
giving a team an extra week to pre-
pare for its next opponent.
But, a ,bye week can be bad,
because it can throw a team off of
its routine.
With that in mind, nobody knows
yet how No. 8 Michigan (3-0 Big
Ten, 5-1 overall) will respond com-
ing off its bye week with a game at
Iowa looming on Saturday.
"How we're going to play after an
off-week, no one knows," Michigan
coach Lloyd Carr said. "Our team
knows this is a big game for us."
Said defensive end Dan
Rumishek: "It's all about remaining
focused - going in there and
watching film, being prepared,
being ready. Iowa's a tough team.

BRENDAN O'DONNELL/Daily
Michigan fans have to hope that Norman Heuer and the rest of the Wolverines
aren't rusty coming off of a bye week. Michigan will face Iowa on Saturday.

"An off-week is a great thing for a
football team in terms of being
healthy again and refocusing on
your goals. I think of it as a momen-
tum builder. I really was able to
look back and see how I've been
doing so far this season and reevalu-
ating my goals and getting after
them again. That fire's back in me
again."
Michigan has lost its game'fol-
lowing an off week for two straight
years, losing at Northwestern last
year 54-51, and falling to Illinois
35-29 the prior year.
But that's not what concerns Carr.
He's more worried about playing at
Iowa (2-2, 4-2) for the first time in
three years.
Former Michigan coach Gary
Moeller once referred to Iowa's
Kinnick Stadium as the Big Ten's
most difficult stadium for a visiting
team.
"The crowd in Iowa is tremen-
dous, and it's a little different envi-
ronment," Carr said. "It's a
throwback. You go to Kinnick Stadi-
um, you sense how much those peo-
ple truly care and love the
Hawkeyes. It's nice to see how much
they care about their players and
programs."
Michigan's current seniors won in
Iowa City as freshmen, as the
Wolverines triumphed 12-9 in a
sloppy game played in the rain.
Similar conditions are a possibili-
ty Saturday. To prepare for that,
Michigan made it a point to practice
outside last Wednesday and Thurs-
day, when it was raining.
"You don't go out there if it's
pouring rain," sophomore quarter-
back John Navarre said. "But
Wednesday and Thursday, when it's
lightly raining, cold and muddy, you
have to see how your team handles
those situations.
"You have to do it with respect to
what you can do with your offense,
and Coach Carr does a good job."
Carr has Michigan in the driver's

seat for another Big Ten title, as the
Wolverines have a one-game lead
over Illinois, Purdue and Ohio State,
three teams that share second place.
Because of Michigan's 45-20 win
over No. 22 Illinois and 24-10 win
over No. 24 Purdue, the Wolverines
own the Big Ten tiebreaker over at.
least those two teams.
Michigan has won at least a share
of three of the last four titles.
"At this point in the road, you
need teams to help you," Navarre
said. "Especially when you don't
play Northwestern, you need a team
like Penn State to help you. You

need all the help you can get, even
though we control our own destiny
if we win out."
Winless Penn State upset North-
western last Saturday, giving the
Wildcats their second Big Ten loss.
"It feels good in the fact that we
can win out and win the Big Ten
championship," Navarre continued.
"If both teams are undefeated and
you don't play each other, it's a dif-
ferent feeling then waiting for
someone to lose.
"It's a great feeling to know if we
win out, then we have the clampi-
onship."

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