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October 15, 2001 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2001-10-15

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2B - The Michigan Daily - SportsMonday - October 15, 2001

4

'M' tennis
focused on
improving
By Melanie Kebler
Daily Sports Editor
For tennis players, the fall season is
a time for improving individual skills
and perfecting techniques, and the best
way to improve is to compete at the
highest level possible. That's exactly
what four members of the Michigan
men's tennis team did last week at the
ITA All-American Championships in
Stone Mountain, Ga.
"There are two or three things we
look to do with the team during the
fall," Michigan assistant coach Dan
Goldberg said. "We want to see indi-
vidual improvement, help players
make technical changes to their game
and get them involved in top level con-
ditions. The idea is to let them see
some different faces and find out
where they stack up nationally."
The tournament - one of the top
two or three in the nation, according to
Goldberg - consisted of a prequalify-
ing round, a qualifying round and a
main draw. Players without a national
ranking started competition in the pre-
qualifying round, while the top-ranked
players automatically received a bid to
the main draw.
Michigan sent three team members
to the prequalifying round. The
Wolverines' No.1 singles player Henry
Beam (No. 43) was invited to the main-
draw.
In prequalifying last Tuesday,
sophomore Anthony Johnson and
freshman Matt Lockin won their first
matches but failed to advance any fur-
ther toward the qualifying round.
Senior Ben Cox went 2-1 for the tour-
nament, advancing through the first
two rounds of prequalifying before
falling to Zoltan Papp of Baylor, 7-5,
6-2.
"I thought we played fair, but
nobody was quite as sharp as we
would have liked," Goldberg said.
"Ben has been battling some arm
problems but otherwise I thought he
had a good chance to make it to the
qualifying round"
Beam began play last Thursday, fac-
ing a tough draw in No. 1 Stanford
singles player K.J. Hippensteel (No.
3), who beat Beam 6-2, 6-0 en route to
the finals of the singles tournament
yesterday.
"Henry got down early and never
quite dug himself out," Goldberg said.
"His opponent played well from the
start. Still, he learned quite a bit in his
first match and played better in his
later consolation match"
In the consolation round, Beam bat-
tled Indiana State's No. I singles play-
er, Stefan Him, but lost in three sets,
6-3, 5-7, 6-2.
Although none of the Wolverines
played particularly well at the ITA
Championship, that doesn't mean that
they didn't get a chance to learn and
improve.
"You learn quite a bit playing
against top players, and that's what we
wanted to do at this tournament,"
Goldberg said. "Our goal this fall is
have some individual time with players
and to help them improve the fine
points of their game."

CLUBP0RTSWEEKLY
Edited bh Kanen, Copeland and Jim heer
Not a draft pick? Join hockey club*

ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

By Eric Chan
Daily Sports Writer
The varsity men's hockey team at Michigan is one of
the best in the nation. But not everyone on campus can
be Mike Komisarek or Mike Cammalleri.
The club hockey team was established eight years
ago, and has been increasing in numbers ever since.
This year the team had 50 hopefuls trying out for a
team with only 25 spots.
Seniors make up more than half of the club team's
roster.
There were freshmen who impressed coach Mike
Radokavich, but there weren't any spots on the team.
Radokavich knows that they are the future of the club
team; so these freshmen are invited to practices that are
very intense and competitive.
But club members noted that the club isn't all work
and no play.
"This is probably the most fun I've ever had with a
hockey team," club president Dan Burkons said. "We're
all friends in there, and we all party together on the
weekends too."
The club hockey team is one of the most competitive
and elite non-varsity teams on campus. Its schedule this
year includes a non-league game against Life Universi-
ty of Georgia, last year's national champion of the
American Collegiate Hockey Association (ACHA). The

team has competed in the ACHA national tournament
the past three years, but it has not been able to bring
home the title.
"Our team has high expectations this year, with only
one goal in mind: Win nationals," Engineering sopho-
more Derek Hickey said.
The team usually plays two games a week, but this
past weekend, it competed in the Oakland University
Showcase in Fraser, Michigan.
Burkons was not pleased with the team's perfor-
mance.
"It was a tough weekend for us," Burkons said. "We
didn't get a full week of practices in like we would have
liked, and a lot of the older guys were taking the
LSATs. Our team just seemed very disorganized."
The squad lost to Michigan State and Humber Col-
lege, a varsity team from Canada Michigan salvaged a
tie with Illinois' club team.
Club members pay a pretty hefty price to be part of
the team.
The amount the club needs to pay for travel and facil-
ities runs about 540,000, but the team only receives
55,000 from the University.
Dues per player this year will be about $1,200 each.
The team does its best to lower these dues through
fundraising and program sales.
"Our club is definitely a great opportunity for good
hockey players to keep on playing," Burkons said.

Who: Alan Webb
Hometown: Reston, Va.

Sport: Cross country
Year: Freshman

Why: Webb finished first in yesterday morning's Wolverine Invitational,
leading 12th-ranked Michigan to a first place team finish. Webb dominat-
ed the field, winning by a margin of 32 seconds en route to his second
victory of the season.

'M'SCHEDULE
Monday, Oct.15
M Golf at Duke Golf Classic, 8 a.m.
Friday, Oct. 19
Ice Hockey at Western Michigan, 7:05 p.m.
Volleyball vs. Ohio State, 7 p.m.
W Soccer vs. Minnesota, 4 p.m.
W Swimming and Diving at Florida, 6 p.m.
M Cross Country at Eastern Michigan Open, 4:30 p.m.
W Golf at Hatter Golf Classic (Orlando, Fla.)
Saturday, Oct. 20
Ice Hockey vs. Western Michigan, 735 p.m.
Field Hockey vs. Penn State, 11 a.m.
Volleyball vs. Penn State, 7 p.m.
W Swimming and Diving at Florida Relays, 10 a.m.
W Golf at Hatter Golf Classic (Orlando, Fla.)
Sunday, Oct. 21
Field Hockey at Central Michigan, 1 p.m.
W Soccer at Oakland, 1 p.m.
M Soccer vs Wisconsin (Varsity Soccer Field), 2 p.m.
W Golf at Hatter Golf Classic (Orlando, Fla.)
W Rowing at Head of the Charles (Boston, Mass.), 8 a.m.
DAILY SCOE 3 AD

I
I
I

Bad weather stymies Wolverines

By Nauman Syed
For the Daily
So far this season, the Michigan
men's golf team has been in the
middle of the pack. Most of the
tournaments it has participated in
have resulted in one school clearly
playing better than the competition.
But the Wolverines' chances to
leave the Duke Golf Classic with a
victory were not dashed by Virginia
Tech - which leads the field after
yesterday's play -- but by bad
weather.
The Wolverines scored 306 in the
first round of play, which was good
enough for 10th out of 18 teams.
Michigan finished 13 strokes behind
the Hokies (5 over par) for the lead,
but only eight behind second place
Tulsa.
The four Michigan scores that
counted were sophomore David
Nichol's 73, senior Andrew Chap-
man's 77 and 78s from senior Andy
Matthews and junior Scott Carlton.
Originally, two rounds were
scheduled yesterday, but weather
conditions halted the second round
just as they began the back nine
holes.
Michigan coach Jim Carras feels
there are several reasons for the
Wolverines' inflated numbers.
"This is a difficult golf course
without adverse weather condi-
tions," Carras said, adding that the
course hosted last season's NCAA
Tournament.
Adding to the difficulty of the
course, the heavy wind and rain cre-
ated higher scores for the entire
field.
"You couldn't see 50 yards in
front of you," Carras said.
In a game with a ball as light as a
golf ball, even slightly adverse con-
ditions have a major impact on the
game. Eventually, tournament offi-

NFL STANDINGS

MLB PLAYOFFS

4

AMERICAN CONFERENCE
Eastern Division
W
Miami 3
Indianapolis 2
NY Jets 3
New England 2
Buffalo 0

T
0
0
0
0
0

Pct.
.750
.667
.500
.250
.000

PF PA
106 111
100 94
114 120
103 102
71 128

Central Division
Baltimore
Cleveland
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Jacksonville
Tennessee
Western Division
Denver
Oakland
San Diego
Seattle
Kansas City

W
3
3
3
3
2
1
W
3
3
3
3
1

T Pct.
0 .750
0 .750
o .667
0 .5oo
0 .50o
0 .000

PF
96
87
59
89
63
67

PA
78
77
48
85
56
98

T>
0
0
0
0
0

Pct.
.750
.750
.750
.500
.250

NATIONAL CONFERENCE
Eastern Division
W
NY Giants 3
Philadelphia 2
Arizona 1
Dallas 0
Washington 0

Central Division
Green Bay
Chicago
Tampa Bay
Minnesota
Detroit
Western Division
St. Louis
San Francisco
New Orleans
Atlanta
Carolina

w
4
3
2
2
0
W
5
4
3
2
1

T Pct.
0 .750
o .50o
0 .333
0 .000
0 .000
T Pct.
o .750
0 .667
0 .667
o .250
o .o0o
T Pct.
0 1.oo
0 .750
0 .667
0 .500
0 .250

PF PA
123 97
108 77
132 87
84 107
95 93
PF PA
91 71
104 62
65 112
66 110
25 135
PF PA
134 50
74 43
68 67
89 111
46 118
PF PA
142 67
122 105
92 67
105 114
86 116

AMERICAN LEAGUE (Home teams in CAPS)
Cleveland vs. Seattle
Game 1: Cleveland 5, SEATTLE 0
Game 2: SEATTLE 5. Cleveland 1
Game 3: CLEVELAND 17, Seattle 2
Game 4: Seattle 6. CLEVELAND 2
Game 5 (today): Cleveland at SEATTLE, 4:20 p.m.
New York Yankees vs. Oakland
Game 1: Oakland 5. NEW YORK 3
Game 2: Oakland 2, NEW YORK 0
Game 3: New York 1, OAKLAND 0
Game 4: New York 9, OAKLAND 2
Game S(today): Oakland at NEw YORK, 8:17 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Atlanta sweeps Houston, 3-0
Game 1: Atlanta 7, HOUSTON 4
Game 2: Atlanta 1, HOUSTON 0
Game 3: ATLANTA 6, Houston 2
St. Louis vs. Arizona
Game 1: ARIZONA 1, St. Louis 0
Game 2: St. Louis 4, ARIZONA 1
Game 3: Arizona 5, ST. Louis 3
Game 4: ST. Louis 4, Arizona 1
Game 5: ARIZONA x, St. Louis x
6M9NOTES L
Stickers split pair of
games over weekend
After losing 2-1Ito No. 10 Ohio State
on Friday, the Michigan field hockey
team bounced back against No. 12
Ohio with a 2-1 victory on'Sunday.
The winning goal yesterday came
from freshman Jessica Blake - who
was also Michigan's only scorer in Fri-
day's contest - with 5:40 left in the
game. Michigan scored in the first half
against the Bobcats with a goal from
sophomore April Fronzoni. Ohio
evened it up in the second with just
over 10 minutes left before Blake's win-
ning goal. The Wolverines' win pre-
vented them from losing two in a row
for the first time all season.
Goalie Maureen Tasch had plenty of
help from the defense as Ohio was only
able to manage six shots on goal.
Michigan's shot total reached .l1 as the
Wolverines kept pressure on Ohio net-
minder Tara Elliot.
The Wolverines will return home
from their weekend in Ohio and will
host their final regular season home
game next week against Penn State
- From staff reports

4

4

DANNY MOLOSHOK/Daily
Poor weather conditions prevented Andy Matthews and his teammates from
finishing all three rounds of the Duke Golf Classic.

NFL GAMES

cials decided to end the day's second
round prematurely.
Normally, a rain delay would not
ruin the Wolverines' chances to win
the tournament. But instead of
throwing out the second round of
play and proceeding with the third,
the leftover holes will be played this
morning at 9 a.m. which will push
back the final round. Carras can
only recall one other incident in his
20 years as Michigan coach when
the second round was finished
instead of being discontinued after

bad weather - 20 years ago at a
tournament in South Carolina.
Aside from its irregular nature,
the delay tomorrow has caused the
team to forgo the final round in
order to make its 4 p.m. return
flight. There are no later flights to
the Detroit Metro Airport that the
team could catch, and four of the
five team members have class on
Tuesday.
"We're not in contention to win
it," Carras said. "This is the
strongest field of the year."

Yesterday's games
CHICAGO 20, Arizona 13
GREEN BAY 31. Baltimore 23
CINCINNATI 24. Cleveland 14
MINNESOTA 31, Detroit 26
New Orleans 27, CAROLINA 25
ST. Louis 15, N.Y. Giants 14
Pittsburgh 20, KANSAS CITY 17
NEW ENGLAND 29, San Diego 26 (OT)
San Francisco 37, ATLANTA 31 (OT)
TENNESSEE 31, Tampa Bay 28 (OT)
SEATTLE 34, Denver 21.
N.Y. JETS 21, Miami 17
Oakland at INDIANAPOLIS, inc.
Today's game
Washington at DALLAS, 9 P.M.
Next week's games
Buffalo at JACKSONVILLE (Thurs. night), 8:30 P.M.
Pittsburgh at TAMPA BAY, 1 P.M.
Carolina at WASHINGTON, 1 P.M.
Chicago at CINCINNATI, 1 P.M.
Baltimore at CLEVELAND, 1 P.M.
Tennessee at DETROIT, 1 P.M.
New England at INDIANAPOLIS, 1 P.M.
Atlanta at NEW ORLEANS, 1 P.M.
St. Louis at NEW YORK JETS, 1 P.M.
Kansas City at ARIZONA, 4 P.M.
Denver at SAN DIEGO, 4 P.M.,
Green'Bay at MINNESOTA, 4 P.M.
Philadelphia at NEW YORK GIANTS (Monday night),

Aa 4

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It Not too Late.
We are pro-rating.
Step Aerobics,
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Kickboxing, Tae Kwon Do

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