100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 01, 2001 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2001-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

2B - The Michigan Daily - SportsMonday - October 1, 2001

4

- ,

Sip)riTsBRIEFS
Indians rout Twins,
clinch AL Central
CLEVELAND (AP) -- As cham-
pagne soaked Cleveland's clubhouse
from floor to ceiling, Charlie Manuel
toasted the Indians' American League
Central title the only way he could.
He raised a glass of cranberry juice.
The Cleveland Indians returned to the
top of the division they've always
believed was theirs, clinching their sixth
division crown in seven years with a 9-1
win yesterday over the Minnesota
Twins.
However, as the players celebrated,
their thoughts were with Manuel, who
remains hospitalized with an abdominal
infection.
"This one's for Charlie," said first
baseman Jim Thome, his shirt and cap
drenched. "Charlie's our leader. We'll
celebrate this one without him, but
hopefully he'll be here for a few more."
Bartolo Colon pitched eight shutout
innings and Thome hit his 49th homer
as the Indians routed the surprising-
Twins, the team they had to chase down
in the second half to get back into the
playoffs.
Ripken bids adieu to
Yankee Stadium
NEW YORK (AP) - About 3 1/2
hours before the final road game of his
career, Cal Ripken Jr. sat in the visitor's
clubhouse at Yankee Stadium yester-
day, watching a movie on a big-screen
TV.
In shorts and a shirt, empty plastic
plate and cup in hand after breakfast,
Ripken took in "61" - about Roger
Maris, Mickey Mantle and the pursuit
of 61 homers 40 years ago.
The story of the Yankees, history,
and an unbreakable record seemed an
apt choice for Ripken, whose Hall of
Fame career has less than a week left.
He was honored with a 15-minute
ceremony yesterday before the Orioles
and Yankees played the closing game of
a three-game series, the latest in a string
of tributes to Baltimore's star.
Ripken, who announced his retire-
ment in June, started yesterday at third
base for the Orioles - his 126th game
at Yankee Stadium, the most by an
opposing player. His first game there
was June 18, 1982.
DAILY SPORTS.
WE'RE GRATEFUL
THAT WE DON'T
ATTEND COLUMBIA.
GRANTED, IT'S A
FINE SCHOOL, BUT IT
HAS QUITE POSSIBLY
THE WORST
ATHLETIC PROGRAM
IN THE HISTORY OF
OUR NATION.

CLUBSPORTSWEEKLY
- Edited br Kareemcn rpeland and Jim Weher
Aikido club welcomes all comers

ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

By Eric Chan
For the Daily
Aikido is an old Samurai fighting
technique dating back over 800 years.
Literally translated from Japanese to
English, aikido means "The way of
harmony with universal energy."
Many of the moves it incorporates
used to be kept very secret. But, the
moves aren't secret anymore, as evi-
denced by the teachings offered by
the aikido club at Michigan.
"We do not study it as a self defen-
sive technique or a fighting technique
but more as a way to learn balance
and how the body works, trying to
understand how people can relate to
each other and communicate with
each other," club head instructor
Akira Kushida said. "However, its
moves can be very deadly."
Sensei Kushida emphasized that
aikido is probably more physical than
it is mental.
"Unlike other Eastern martial arts,
we don't do meditation, or try to do
ESP or anything like that," Kushida
said.
"But we do try to have good atti-
tudes and respect toward others and

we try to build our minds in that
way."
In movies like "Under Siege" and
"Hard to Kill" one can see aikido as
seventh-degree black belt Steven Sea-
gal throws around armed terrorists.
This is a poor portrayal of aikido, as
Kushida warned that practices are
quite demanding aerobically. But
Kushida also added that club mem-
bers can move at their own pace and
take breaks.
Every martial art has a central
theme. For example, tae kwon do cen-
ters on striking, Brazilian jiu-jitsu
centers on submission holds, and judo
centers on throwing.
Aikido focuses more on using the
topponent's energy against him with
joint locks and throws as counter-
moves. In addition, unlike other mar-
tial art forms, aikido is a
non-competitive art.
Like most martial arts clubs at
Michigan, the aikido club is great for
beginners. According to fourth-year
club member Jeff Balcerski, "The
instructors were great in getting me
up to speed and very supportive of me
starting out as a beginner," he said.
Balcerski also noted that there are

always two instructors per class: One
to help out the beginners and one to.
teach the more advanced students.
There is a great deal of tradition
and honor that goes along .with the art.
Students step on the mat at a specified
corner, and bow when doing so. Bow-
ing is also appropriate when address-
ing an instructor and is done before
students practice any techniques.
The class is taught by Sensei
Kushida and third-degree black belt
Karen Clark. Sensei Kushida has been
training for almost 25 years, while
Clark has been practicing aikido for
16 years. Both are affiliated with the
Genyokan Dojo on Airport Boulevard
in Ann Arbor.
Martial arts instructors are usually
stereotypically depicted in popular
media as mean, pushy and even tyran-
nical. This is far from how Sensei
Kushida and Clark could be
described. Both are kind, energetic
teachers of an art form they love.
Michigan's aikido club is open to
everyone. Practices are held Tues-
days, Thursdays and Fridays from 5-6
p.m. Dues are S40 a month, which
mostly goes toward the instructors'
fees.

Who: Eric Nystrom
Hometown: Syosset, N.Y.
Position: Forward

Sport: Hockey
Year: Freshman

Why: In only his first game as a Michigan Wolverine, freshman Eric Nys-
trom recorded a hat trick as Michigan defeated Queens University 9-0.
Nystrom scored two of his goals off rebounds in front of the net, and
sniped his third in on a power play during the second period.

Nystrom

Wednesday, Oct. 3
M Soccer at Oakland, 4 p.m.
Volleyball vs. Michigan State, 7 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 4
Field Hockey at Michigan State, 7:30 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 5
W Cross Country at Notre Dame Invitational, 4:15 p.m.
W Soccer at Ohio State, 6 p.m.
Volleyball at Purdue, 7 p.m.
W Tennis hosts Wolverine Fall Invitational
M Tennis at ITA All-American Championships Prequalifying
(Stone Mountain, Ga.)
Saturday. Oct. 6
Football at Penn State, 3:30 p.m.
Ice Hockey at Michigan State, 7:05 p.m.
Softball hosts Michigan Fall Tournament, 10 a.m.
W Crew at Head of the Ohio (Pittsburgh, Pa.), 8 a.m.
M Cross Country at Murray Keatinge Invitational (Orono, Maine), 11 a.m.
W Golf hosts Wolverine Invitational
W Tennis hosts Wolverine Fall Invitational
M Tennis at ITA All-American Championships Prequalifying
(Stone Mountain, Ga.)

4

Club Sports Round-up
Here are some of last week's results for Michigan club sports teams.
MEN'S SOCCER (4-1-1) RUGBY - "A" SIDE (3-1) WOMEN'S SOCCER (3-0)
MICHIGAN 31 OHIO STATE 29 MICHIGAN 2, MIAMI
(OHIO) 0
MICHIGAN 4 EASTERN MICHIGAN 0
MICHIGAN 5 MICHIGAN STATE 1
MICHIGAN 0 DAYTON 0
Tankers open with intrasquad

4

DAILY COREBOARD

MLB STANDINGS

NFL STANDINGS
AMERICAN CONFERENCE

By Kyle O'Neill
For The Daily

After 13 Big Ten Championships, 110 All-Americans,
two NCAA Coach of the Year awards, and one NCAA
team silver medal in 1995, one might think Michigan
women's swimming coach Jim Richardson feels comfort-
able knowing that he has history on his side when he goes
into a season - but he knows better.
"It's a brand new year and the team that won last year is
not the team who will compete this year" said Richardson,
whose squad competed for the first time in the 2001-02
season with an intrasquad meet on Friday.
Although the meet was not scored, it provided the first
chance for Richardson to see how the team would swim
without three key contributors - departed seniors Jennifer
Crisman and Melissa Sugar and 2000 Olympic gold medal-
list Samantha Arsenault.
Arsenault, a sophomore, has been out with a shoulder
injury since last year's NCAA Championships and it is
unknown when she will be able to get back into the pool at
100 percent.
The Wolverines who did compete at the intrasquad did
not disappoint. Senior captain Lindsay Carlberg, a repre-
sentative at the World University Games, led her team to
10 first-place finishes over the team led by fellow senior
captain Andrea Kurrle.
Lindsay "had a great summer," said Richardson. "It gave
her a lot of confidence. She likes to hit the wall first and
she's tougher right now than ever before."
Also making a good impression at the intrasquad were
the new Wolverines. Freshman Amy McCullough scored a
win for Kurrle's team in 1000-yard freestyle and Kentucky
transfer Kelli Stein claimed firsts in the 100 and 200 breast-

strokes and was a part of the winning 200 medley relay.
'Kelli has tools. is very coachable and has a good mind-
set. She could be among the best breaststrokers in school
history, which is some very elite company," Richardson
said.
All-American Emily Fenn, who had a lengthy fight with
scoliosis this summer, has returned to the pool with an
upbeat attitude, even though it may be until December
before she can get back to swimming well on a daily basis.
With Fenn and Arsenault - who is resting her shoulder
in hopes she will be able to train for the 2004 Summer
Olympics in Athens - both not at their normal level, the
Wolverines will be relying on the rest of the team, especial-
ly the younger swimmers, to step up.
"I was happy with what we had from our freshmen,"
assistant coach Stefanie Kerska said. "It takes time for
them to adjust to our program. We have (the intrasquad) to
start thinking about competition, but we will need all three
weeks of practice to be ready for the meets in Florida."
Michigan begins its season in Gainesville, Fla. on Oct.
19-20 and will remain on the road until Christmas break
before going to Hawaii for a two-week training trip. The
Wolverines open at home on Jan. 18 against Penn State,
last year's Big Ten runner-up.
"This team looks about average right now when com-
pared with other Michigan teams," said Richardson. "Their
commitment and attitude are above average, so I am hop-
ing the physical part catches up. It is important to swim
confidently and not feel the pressure, which I don't think
we have so far. That's definitely the challenge in front of
us.
"We need to take the season one day at a time. If we can
string together enough of those days in a row, we give our-
selves a very good chance to have success.

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Eastern Division
New York Yankees
Boston
Toronto
Baltimore
Tampa Bay
central Division
cleveland
Chicago White Sox
Minnesota
Detroit
Kansas city
western Division
Seattle
Oakland
Anaheim
Texas
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Eastern Division
Atlanta
Philadelphia
New York Mets
Florida
Montreal
Central Division
Houston
St. Louis
Chicago Cubs
Milwaukee
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh'
Western Division
Arizona
San Francisco
Los Angeles
San Diego
Colorado

W L
91 62
76 77
74 80
62 92
57 97
W L
88 66
81 74
81l 74
64 91
61 94
W L
110 45
96 56
75 80
71 84

Pct GB
.595 -
.497 15
.481 17.5
.403 29.5
.370 34.5
Pct GB
.571 -
.523 7.5
.523 7.5
.413 24.5
.394 27.5

Eastern Division
Indianapolis
Miami
NY Jets
New England
Buffalo
Central Division
Cincinnati
Jacksonville
Cleveland
Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Western Division
San Diego
Denver
Oakland
Seattle
Kansas City

W
2
2
1
0
0
W
2
2
1
1
0
0
W
2
2
1
1
0

T
0
0
0
0
0

w
84
82
79
72
65
w
91
89
84
65
64
58'
w
88
86
81
76
70

Pct.
1.00
1.00
.500
.000
.000

L
71
73
76
83
90
L
64
66
71
90
91
'97
L
67
69
74
79
85

Pct GB
.710 -
.619 14
.484 35
.458.39
Pct GB
.542 -
.529 2
.510 5
.465 12
.419 19
Pct GB
.587
.574 2
.542 7
.419 26
.413 27
.374 33
Pct GB
.568 -
.555 2
.523 7
.490 12
.452 18

NATIONAL CONFERENCE
Eastern Division
W
NY Giants 1
Philadelphia 1
Washington 0
Arizona 0
Dallas 0

T Pct.
0 1.00
0 1.00
o .5oo
0 .500
0 .000
0 .000
T Pct.
0 1.0
0 1.00
0 .500
o .500
0 .000
T Pct.
0 .500
0 .500
o .000
o .ooo
0 .000
T Pct.
0 1.00
0 .500
0 .000
0 .000
T Pct.
0 1.00
0 1.00
0 .500
0 .5oo
0 .500

PA
50
38
48
33
66
PA
27
9
23
27
21
44
PA
24
37
42
33
40
PA
34
23
67
38
42
PA
'6
6
27
41
52
PA
43
6
32
43
37

4

Central Division
Green Bay
Tampa Bay
Chicago
Minnesota
Detroit
Western Division
St. Louis
New Orleans
Atlanta
San Francisco
Carolina

w
2
1
1
0
0
W
2
1
1
1

L
0
0,
1
2
2
L
0
0
1
1
1

4

MLB SCORES
Yesterday's games
Minnesota at Cleveland
Boston at Detroit
Baltimore at New York Yankees
New York Mets at Atlanta
Montreal at Cincinnati
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City
Pittsburgh at St. Louis
Houston at Chicago Cubs
Milwaukee at Colorado
Texas at Anaheim
San Diego at San Francisco
Philadelphia at Florida
Oakland at Seattle
Los Angeles at Arizona

NFL GAMES
Yesterday's games
Pittsburgh 20, Buffalo 3
Minnesota 16,.Tampa Bay 13

W HY WOULD
ANYONE EVER
WANT TO GO
THERE?

-_ _ _ _ __,

HELP WANTED

New York Giants 21. New Orleans 13
Green Bay 28, Carolina 7
St. Louis 42, Miami 10
New England 44, Indianapolis 13
Kansas City 45. Washington 13
Atl~nta 34, Arizona 14
San Diego 28, Cincinnati 14
Oakland 38, Seattle 14
Cleveland 23, Jacksonville 14
Baltimore 20, Denver 13
Dallas at Philadelphia, 8:30 p.m.
BYES: Chicago, Detroit, Tennessee
Today's game
San Francisco at New York Jets, 9:00 p.m.
Next week's games
Chicago at Atlanta, 1:00 p.m.
San Diego at Cleveland, 1:00 p.m.
New England at Miami, 1:00 p.m.
Minnesota at New Orleans. 1:00 p.m.
Washington at New York Giants. 1:00 p.m.
Arizona at Philadelphia, 1:00 p.m.
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 1:00 p.m.
Tennessee at Baltimore. 1:00 p.m.
Jacksonville at Seattle. 4:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
New York Jets at Buffalo, 4:05 p.m.
Dallas at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
Green Bay at Tampa Bay, 4:15 p.m.
Carolina vs. San Francisco. 8:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Detroit, 9:00 p.m. (Monday Night)
MINOTES

4

4

4

Trip to Notre Dame
successful for netters
The Michigan men's tennis team
won a total of 13 singles matches and
three doubles matches at the Notre
Dame Invitational this weekend.
The tournament - which took place
in South Bend over the past three days
- featured I1 teams from around the
nation, including Harvard and several
teams from the Big Ten.
Senior Greg Novak led the way for
the Wolverines with a 3-2 singles
record. In doubles play, Novak record-
ed two victories, partnered with both
iunior Jeremy Edelson and sophomore

m

m

"II IS

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan