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September 24, 2001 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 2001-09-24

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2B - The Michigan Daily - SportsMonday - September 24, 2001

'M'NOTES
Freshman sensation
Webb stars at Invite
The Michigan men's cross country
team finished in second place at the
Great American Cross Country Festival
last Friday.
The meet took place in Rock Hill,
S.C., and featured the one-two attack of
the Wolverines' accomplished veteran,
senior Mark Pilja, and their sensational
newcomer, freshman Alan Webb.
Webb finished first with a time of
24:05, and was followed three seconds
later by his elder teammate.
North Carolina State won the overall
competition with a score of 34. Michi-
gan followed with a 67. Duke, Ten-
nessee and Georgia rounded out the top
five.
The team races again this Saturday at
the William and Mary Invitational in
Williamsburg, Va.
-fom staff reports
Strikers defeat Iowa;
even Big Ten record
The women's soccer team used its
head in more ways than one yesterday
in a 1-0 victory over Iowa. The
Wolverines are now 1-1 in the Big
Ten and 3-4 overall.
Captain Andrea Kayal headed the
ball into the goal after a perfect corner
kick by Amy Sullivant for the game's
only goal. Just as important, the team
stayed focused the entire game and
avoided the mental breakdown that
led to a 2-1 loss to Illinois on Friday.
Michigan also played well against
the Fighting Illini and took the lead
with 19:42 in the first half on a head-
er by captain Laurie Peterson.
Stephanie Chavez assisted on the goal
with a header that set up Peterson.
Illinois out-shot Michigan 27-15 in
the game but it appeared Michigan
was going to escape with a win as
they took their lead into the final
minute of play.
With 40 seconds left in regulation,
Illinois' Colleen Joyce tied the score
at'1-1 and forced the game into over-
time. Just 2:47 into the extra session,
Joyce ended the game with another
shot past Michigan goalie Suzie
Grech.
-from stuff reports
Women's golf easily
wins Lady Northern
In a weekend of career-bests, the
women's golf team began its 2001-02
season with an impressive 14-stroke
victory at the Lady Northern. Junior
Kim Benedict and seniors Misia
Lemanski, Cortney Reno and LeAnna
Wicks were second, fourth, sixth and
eighth, respectively, and each set new
individual 54-hole career-lows.
Freshman Laura Olin, in her first col-
legiate competition, shot a 73 on the
final day to jump 16 spots and tie for
1 Ith. Bess Bowers, a senior, posted a
three day total of 240 to tie for 57th on
the weekend.
Michigan's tournament score was
also a school record as its 873 was 16
strokes better than its previous record
set last October during the Women's
Collegiate Shootout in Indiana.
The only other schools in contention
going into the final day was Northwest-
em with a total of 887 on the weekend
and Kent State, a 2001 qualifier for the
NCAA Championships, with an 892.

Kent State also had the individual
champion, Martina Gillen, who tied for
30th last year at the NCAA finals.
-fiom staff reports

CLUBSPORTSWEEKLY

Wanted: Female club

By Eric Chan
For the Daily
"I just love this sport," Amanda Bush
says with a smile. Bush sits by the
wrestling mat, watching the guys drill
double leg takedowns. Dana Sullivan
sits a couple feet away stretching her
legs out. Her stretching will prove futile,
as she won't have anyone with whom to
wrestle. Sullivan usually practices with
Bush, but not this week. Bush -
exhausted from schoolwork and meet-
ings - leaves Sullivan as the only
women dressed for practice.
"Well, it's mostly a matter of strength
and experience," sophomore Brent Frey
said about the difference between the
male and female wrestlers. "Most of the
guys in here are guys who have lots of
high school experience, and some are
even trying out for the varsity team.
When we're learning new moves we'll
work with them some times."
Bush has been enamored with the
sport of wrestling since high school. She
always wanted to wrestle, but said the
community looked down on the idea of
a girl joining the wrestling team.
Instead, she joined the team as a manag-
er. She went to every meet, kept score

and hung out with the other wrestlers.
Bush decided that women should
have their own outlet for wrestling, so
she looked to start a women's wrestling
club at Michigan last fall. But, enroll-
ment faltered and she made the club co-
ed.
Wrestlers, including Frey and Mark
Hoffman, used to go to the Martial Arts
room in the CCRB hoping to find others
with whom to wrestle. When sign-up
sheets for the wrestling club popped up
around the building, they wholehearted-
ly scribbled their names down. More
and more people heard about the club
through word of mouth.
At the first practice, the club had
about 15 wrestlers. Bush, however, was
disappointed to see that none of the 15
were women. None came the entire first
year.
Frey said that the practices through-
out the inaugural year ran smoothly. He
said that he would usually break a
sweat, even though the workouts
weren't that structured.
This year, Chris Bogoski, a high
school wrestling coach, has volunteered
his services to the club. Frey and the
other wrestlers say that practices under
Bogoski have become more

- Eited by Kareem LCopeland and Jim Weber
g Tap plerTs
structured. The wrestlers start with light
drilling and new moves, then wrestle
live. The club usually finishes with an
intense abdominal workout
Frey was disappointed that more peo-
ple did not attend practices, so he and
Bush sought new members at this year's
Festifall. Frey said about 40 people
signed up, half of them women. Bush
was excited that she might have some-
one to wrestle.
But as the club began its second
year, Dana Sullivan was the only other
girl to show up. The men's side had
only three or four new members. Sorori-
ty and fraternity rush could have caused
the paucity of members early in the
term, Bush said. She hopes that more
people, especially women, will drop by
after rush ends.
Bush also believes that many women
may be worried about how men in the
club treat them. "I bet some of the girls
who signed up in Festifall, are thinking,
like now, 'What did I get myself into?"'
Bush said.
"Girls really shouldn't be worried
about coming down here; all the guys
treat us with respect. I think there is a
bond and respect among all wrestlers,
regardless of sex."

ATHLETE OF THE WEEK
Who: Catherine Foreman Sport: Field Hockey
Hometown: Happy Valley, South Australia Year: Senior
Position: Defender
Why: Catherine Foreman was a factor in four of the Wolverines' six goals
on Friday, as Michigan pounded Massachusetts 6-0. Foreman posted a
career-high four assists, moving her a step closer tothe Michigan career
assist record. The Wolverines also won their Big Ten home openeron
Sunday against Indiana 10-1. Foreman
Friday. Sept.28
M Golf hosts Wolverine Invitational, 9 a.m.
Field Hockey vs. Iowa, 3 p.m.
W Soccer vs. Northwestern, 4 p.m.
M Soccer vs. Dayton (Pioneer High School), 7 p.m.
Volleyball vs. Iowa, 7 p.m.
Ice Hockey in Blue/White Intrasquad (exhibition), 7 p.m.
M Tennis at Notre Dame Invitational
Saturday, Sept. 29
W Soccer vs. Wisconsin
Rowing hosts Boathouse Day, 10 a.m.
W Swim/Diving in Intrasquad Meet, 10 a.m.
M Cross Country at Roy Griak Invitational (Minneapolis) 11 a.m.
Football vs. Illinois, 3:30 p.m.
Volleyball vs. Minnesota, 7 p.m.
M Tennis at Notre Dame Invitational
Sunday, Sept. 30
W Soccer vs. Wisconsin, 1 p.m.
Ice Hockey vs. Queens (exhibition), 2:05 p.m.
M Soccer vs. Western Michigan (Varsity Field), 3:30 p.m.
Field Hockey at Ball State, 2:30 p.m.
M Golf hosts Wolverine Invitational, TBA
M Tennis at Notre Dame Invitational
DAILY COcRJEARD

Rumors aside,
dancers return
to, Crisler Arena
Charles Paradis
Daily Sports Writer
They may have pom-poms, but they are definitely not
cheerleaders. They are the women 'of the Michigan dance
team. They do not cheer, they do not flip up in the air, they
do not perform any sort of stunt whatsoever.
These girls just dance.
The team is coached by Valerie Potsos, who was the dance
team captain in 1992. Following in her footsteps are this
year's three co-captains: Junior Brittany Johnson and sopho-
mores Lorin O'Toole and Amy Palmer.
"We do more of a variety of styles, we do dance with
poms in our hands, but at the same time we do jazz routines
and we'll do hip-hop routines," Palmer said.
Not only does the team perform for sporting events, it also
competes at the national level.
"Our biggest performance actually is our national competi-
tion in Orlando, Fla. It is in January and we go down there
and compete against dance teams from across the nation,"
Johnson said "Our goal this year is to be in the top three at
Nationals."
The team also dances during timeouts and in between
halves for those gathered in Crisler Arena, home of men's
basketball team.
For a while, fears were raised that the team would not be
able to dance at basketball games anymore.
"There was some talk based on space requirements," Mar-
keting Director Tom Brooks said.
But last week, Athletic Director Bill Martin, allayed any
fears when he announced his decision that the team would be
allowed to dance at Crisler again this season. Martin's decision
might have been affected by an overwhelming support for the
team. While mulling over the issue, the athletic department
received an undisclosed number of e-mails in support of the
team.
But in the end, Michigan decided that the team should con-
tinue to dance on the court this season.
But the dance team is not welcome at Michigan Stadium.
"We hope one day to get on the field because dance teams
are becoming very popular nowadays and a lot of Big Ten
teams do have their dance teams on the field," Johnson said.
Currently, the athletic department does not see a way to
integrate the team into the football game.
"I don't think there is enough time, enough room and it
isn't a part of the tradition of Michigan football," Martin said.

Despite rumors to the contrary, the Michigan dance team will
be performing during basketball games at Crisler Arena.
Martin was also concerned that the dance team would cut
into the marching band's time.
While it may not be a part of the Michigan football tradi-
tion, it is for six other Big Ten schools, including Michigan
State. Dance teams have also been on the field of Michigan
Stadium for the first two home games as both Miami (Ohio)
and Western Michigan's teams performed.
The closest the team gets to kickoff is dancing before the
home football games at the Michigan Experience. Few peo-
ple have heard a great deal about the Michigan dance team or
dance teams in general. But the sport has seen a significant
increase in exposure recently.
"It has really taken off in the past few years and we intend
to keep going on that same track," Johnson said.
This can be attributed inpart to the increased skill level of
the sport. Moving beyond the realm of a hobby or pastime,
the dance team is now recognized as an important part of
Michigan athletics.
"I have noticed in the past five or six years that dance team
has taken off, they are becoming more athletic," Palmer said.
"They're definitely pushing toward the sport end of it. It's
not just fun and games anymore; it is very serious and very
competitive. We take it very seriously."
This is the first year for coach Potsos, who hopes to lead
the squad to an impressive showing at nationals this year.
"Our coach this year is new and she is doing and awesome
job," O'Toole said. "I think she is really going to help our
team take it up to another level."

MLB STANDINGS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Eastern Division -
W L Pct GB
New York Yankees 88 60 .595 -
Boston 75 71 .514 12
Toronto 73 76 .490 05.5
Baltinore n 89 39 29.
Tampa Bay 53 96 .356 35.5
Central Division W L PtGB
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 86 e4 .573 -
Minnesota 70 701sa5277
Chcago White Sox 7072 .5a 0
Detroit 6es8as.403 25.5
ans City 5 58 9 .389 27.5
Western Division
W L PtnGB
seattle 10643 .70 -
Oaklad m 0 55 5 .600 05
Anaheim 74 75 '097 32
Texas 69 80 .463 37
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Eastern Division
Atlanta 00 69 .037 -
Philaelphia 00 70 .533 0.
New Yark Mets 76 74 .507 4.5
Floriaa 69 00 .403 00
Montreal 64 86 .427 16.5
central Division
W L PctOGB
Houston 08 60 .595 -
St. Louis 85 66 .567 4
Csivago Cubs 00 67 .547 7
Milwaukee 6 4 86 .427 25
C ncinnati 61 89 .407 28
Pittsburgh 56 94 .373 33
Westemn Division
W L Pct000
Arizona 03 66 .557 -
san Franisco 01 60 .544 2
Los Angeles 00 69 .537 3
Sen Diego 74 74 .000 .5,
Colorado 66 03 .443 07
MLB SCORES
Yesterdayns games
Detoit 12, BOSON 6
Tampa Bay 1, TORONTOa0
CCAO ALIDO sansas City 2
Cleveand 4,MIssESOnAo2
TEXAS 5, Anahein3
Alanta 5, Nsa ToeRE (L) 4
Coloado~ 5, MOo,,:A, 3
PHiLADELPHIA 5. Florida 4
PITTSBURGH 2, St. Louis1
MiLWAUKEE 7, Cincinnati 3
HOvSON 7, Chicago (NL) 6
SnFanciscoatSAN DIEGO INC.
Arizona at LOs ANGELES, INC.
Seattle at OAKLAND, INC.
New York (AL) at BALTIMoRE, INC
Today's games
Baltimore a0Boston
Torontoat Cleveland
Detra at Ktansas City
Seattle at Texas
Chicago (NL) at Pittsburgh
Atlanta at Foridatn
St. Lauis at Houston
San Diego at Colorado
San Francisco at Los Angeles

NFL STANDINGS
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
Eastern Division
W L T Pct. PF PA
Indianapolis 2 0 0 1.00 87 50
Miami 2 0 0 1.00 49 38
N lets 0 0 0 .000 24 45
NewEtngland 0 00 .000 17 23
Buffalo 0 2 0 .000 32 66
Central Division WLTPt PF A
W L T Pct. PPAP
Cincinnati 2 0 0 1.00 44 27
Jacksonvilie 2 0 0 1.00 34 9
Clevelani 0 1 0 .500 30 23
Baltimore 0 0 0 .500 27 27
Tnnessee 0 2 0 .0n 29 44
Pittsurgh 0 1 0 .000.3 21
Western Division
W L T Pt. P PA
San Diego 2 0 0 1.00 62 24
Denver 10 01.00 30 20
Seattle 0 001.00 9 6
Oakland 1 1 0 .500 42 42
Kansas City 0 2 0 .000 27 40
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
EsteDivisio
W L T Pt. PP. PA
NY Giants 1 0 00 SOD5 3 34
Philadelphia 0 1 0 .000 17 20
Dallas 0 2 0 .000 27 42
Washington 0 0 0 .000 3 30
Arizona 0 0 0 .000 0 0
W L T Pct. PF PA
Green Bay 1 0 0 1.00 28 6
TampaSay 1 0 0 1.00 10 6
Chicago 1 1 0 .500 23 27
Minnesota 0 2 0 .000 23 4
Detroit 0 2 0.00020 52
western Division
W L T Pt. PP PA
St. Lois 1 0 0 .00 20 7
San Frncisco 1 0 0 1.00 16 13
Newv Orleas 0 0 0 .00 24 6
Caroline00.500 40 37
Atlanta 0 1 0 .500 37 32
NFL GAMES
Yesterdae's games
CINvIsrI 21, Baltimore 10
San Diego 32, DALLAs 21
INDIANAPOs 42, Buffalo 26
JACKSoNvILLE 13Tennessee 6
Atlanta 24, Carolina 16
CLEvELAND 24, Detroit 14
Chicago 17, Minnesota 10
New York Giants 13 KANSAsCITY3
Miami 18, Oakland 15
New York Jets at NEw ENGLAND, INC.
Philadelphia at sEATTLE, INC.
St. Louis at SAN FRANSes, INC.
Denverat ARIZONA, Inc.
BYES: New Orleans, Pittsburgh, Tampa Bay
Today's game
Washington at GREEN BAY, 9:00 p.m. ABC
Next week's games
Pittsburgh at Buffalo, 1:00 p.m.
Tampa ay at Minnesota, 1:00 p.m.
New Orleans at New York Giants. 1:00 p.m.
Green Bay at Carolina, 1:00 p.m.
Miami am St. Louis, 1:00 p.m.
Indianapolis at New England, 1:00 p.m.
Kansas City at Washington, 1:00 p.m.
Atlanta at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
Cleveland at Jacksonville, 4:15 p.m.
Baltimore at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Philadelphia. 8:30 p.m.
San Francisco at New York Jets, 00/1 9:00 p.m.
BYES: Chicago, Detroit, Tennessee
A look at the
underside of U of M
www.1niversitysecrts.com
Food for Thought
Lessons from
Terrorist Acts
If you wonder what we
will learn from the terrorist
attacks, you are already
seeing it. I learned in
Vietnam that Americans
are the best people on
earth. That is why the
Vietnamese people, to the
chagrin of their government,
still respect us.

Gary Lillie & Assoc., Realtors
www.garylillie.com

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