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September 21, 2001 - Image 17

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2001-09-21

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- B Aw
108 - The Michigan Daily - FOOTBALL SATURDAY - Friday, September 21, 2001

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Friday, September 21, 2001 - FooTBAL

NYU students adapt to
life near Ground Zero

WHEN W. MICHIGAN
HAS THE FOOTBALL

Wolverines face potei

30 Reed
20 Clark

TB

By Arun Gopal
Daily Sports Writer

By Elizabeth Kassab
Raily Staff Reportcr

NEW YORK New York University
sophomore Bryce Roebel said he attend-
ed class as usual after watching from
Washington Square Park as United
Airlines Flight 175 crashed into World
Trade Center Tower 2 on Sept. 11.
"During class they collapsed. so when
I came out of class and looked south, they
weren't there," he said.
The collapse knocked out power in
four of NYU's residence halls, including
the one Roebel lives in.
Like thousands of other New Yorkers
who live in the vicinity of the World
Trade Center, Roebel had not yet been
able to return to his home as of last week-
end.
Roebel said he had been staying with
friends, and NYU gave students some
money to buy clothes and other necessi-
ties they didn't have.
The residence halls farther away from
the site of the terrorist attacks were able
to remain open. NYU freshman Chris
Hale still had access to his residence hall,
located near Washington Square Park. lie
walked out of his room the morning of
Sept. II for a class, not realizing what
had happened.
"I noticed a lot of people just standing
around," he said. "When I got to the cor-
ner, I looked downtown and saw lots of
smoke."
Second-year law student Denise Ryan
said she and her neighbors stood in and

"If we've ever been justified in going to
war in the past, we're justified now."
- Denise Ryan
New York University law student

81 Wolverton
3 Mosley
WR
60 Stover 71 Conesmy
77 McCord 68 Montgomery

12 W
4 Bush
nay 67 Kramer 64 Hinson
6 oe 79 Ras 70 McCants

around Washington Square Park watch-
ing the destruction of the twin towers.
"You could see glass coming out and
people coming out" of the top floors, she
said.
In the streets, people clustered around
the cars that were stopped in the road to
hear the radios' explanations of the sight.
Ryan said she listened in "complete
disbelief" as the reports kept coming in.
She then went to the law school, where
there were televisions set up in the
lounge. Some of the students watching
had friends, family or fiances who
worked in the World Trade Center.
"When the first tower fell, you knew
there were people in there that you knew,
and there was nothing you could do," she
said.
Tuesday was filled with frantic search-
es, Ryan said. Since virtually no tele-
phones were working, people were using
e-mail and instant messaging services to
try to locate friends and family.
The rest of New York responded with
an outpouring of support, she said.
"People were just trying to find out
how they could help" IHale said. "They
told people they needed blood, and then
within an hour they were telling people

there were five-hour lines."
I Hale said he always took it for granted
that he was born an American. But the
recent events and New York's response
"brings a deeper sense that we are all
Americans. It has made it a little more
real:' he said.
Ryan said she is skeptical that the
United States would commit to a ground
war. but she admitted she would never
have imagined a week ago that the twin
towers could be the target of a terrorist
attack.
"If we've ever been justified in going
to war in the past, we're justified now,"
she said.
When he was growing up. Roebel said
he dreamed of being in the Navy. Though
he didn't pursue that ambition, he said he
is willing to serve his country now.
"I'd do almost anything if they asked
me to," he said. "It's time for everyone to
come together."
Ryan said last weeks events have New
York shaken. but she said it will get back
to normal.
She said New Yorkers have no choice
but to continue walking the streets and
taking the subway. "It's hard. You can't
really leave."

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W. MICHIGAN ROSTER

DAVID KATZ/Dady
Two New York City firefighters stand outside the Engine 54 fire station last weekend
after having returned from Ground Zero. More than 135 firefighters were promoted in
a ceremony Sunday, with hundreds still trapped in the rubble and presumed dead.
Local firefighters
aid rescue effort

TH~M~8K~N AIL's(~QT:: le VEB(XOF T 6:SP -W ~BQI~ ~A
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www.michganaily con/atack

Good Food,
Good Drinks,
Good Prices...
Good Time Charley's After 11 P.M.

By David Enders
Daily News Editor
NEW YORK James McRoberts
still couldn't believe 15 firefighters are
missing from the Engine 54 Fire
Stat -
"Nobody ever can turn around and
say they lost 15" said McRoberts, a
lieutenant with the Southfield, Mich.,
fire department. His nephew, who is
alive, is a member of the Engine 54 sta-
tion at the corner of Eighth Avenue and
48th Street in Manhattan.
Outside the station, relatives of fire-
fighters lost when the World Trade
Center towers collapsed wept and lit
candles, so many that the entire side-
walk was covered with wax.
"This is going on at every engine
house," McRoberts said. As
McRoberts spoke last weekend, dust-
covered firefighters arrived from
Ground Zero. The crowd around the
station clapped for the new arrivals.
Firefighters and other rescue work-
ers have been working 10- to 12-hour
shifts at the site, he said, removing
what is left bucket-by-bucket so no
remains are missed.
McRoberts spent time at Ground
Zero earlier in the week, and was plan-
ning to return Saturday.
"It's a logistical nightmare," he said.
"With decomposition (of the bodies)
it's going to be extremely difficult."
The toll on the entire fire department
has been estimated at around 300.
"I think there were more people than
normal (responding to the World Trade
Center) because it was a shift change,"

McRoberts said. "You had guys who
were coming in early and guys who
were still hanging around"
At the Jacob Javits Convention
Center at I11th Avenue and 34th Street,
people from all over the country stood
in a line that stretched two city blocks,
waiting to become part of the relief
effort.
"The crater is 60 feet deep," said
Lance Myck, a structural steelworker
from Queens. N.Y., who was at Ground
Zero the day after the attacks. "They
can't use a crane because (the rubble)
is too heavy."
Officials announced during the
weekend that they will use DNA to
identify many of the remains.
"We couldn't find anybody," Myck
said. "Everything was pancaked."
Fires still burned at the site last
Saturday, sending smoke across lower
Manhattan. People walked down Wall
Street in gas masks.
On King Street between Sixth and
Seventh avenues, the America.: Society
for the Prevention of Cruelty to
Animals was reuniting pets with their
owners.
"We're providing food, transporta-
tion and carriers," said ASPCA spokes-
woman Deborah Sindell. "In the last
two days, we've rescued 45 to 50 pets
- cats, dogs, ferrets, guinea pigs."
Sindell said the group was sending
"Humane Law Enforcement Officers"
into areas near Ground Zero to bring
the pets out.
"We've seen some extremely
stressed out pets," she said. "Some
with respiratory problems."

2 Ronald Rogers
3 Kendrick Mosley
4 Josh Bush
5 Antonio Thomas
6 Osborn Curtis
7 Carlos Smith
8 Brandon Johnson
9 Micah Zuhl
10 Mitch John
10 Anthony Turner
11 Jermaine Lewis
12 Jeff welsh
14 Ryan Harris
15 Greg Jennings
15 Walter Malone
16 Wes Dodson
17 Rob Menchinger
18 Blayne Baggett
18 Brian Henderson
19 Jonathan Drach
20 Benny Clark
20 Ryan Powell
21 Tony Carr
22 Charles Woods
23 Kevin Coleman
23 Matt Rittenour
24 K.T. Robinson
25 Brent Bradney
26 Joe Ballard
27 Rashad McDade
29 Brandon Brown
30 Daniel Marks
30 Jon Randall
31 Mike Johnson
32 Trovon Riley
33 Erik Oleson
34 Willie Miller
35 Nick Melcher
35 Ross Farren
36 Steve Gubernick
37 Anthony Allsbury
38 Blake Nasif
38 Steve Dick
39 Adam Anderson
40 Jason Feldpausch
41 Sam Reynolds
41 Ted Newhoff
42 Jermaine Foreste
43 Tony Gioutsos
45 Josh Behrens
45 Marc Sears
46 Bryan Lape

5-9
6-3
5-9
6-4
6-1
6-4
6-3
6-0
6-3
5-11
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6-3
6-1
6-1
5-11
5-10
5-10
6-2
6-0
6-4
5-7
6-0
6-1
5-10
5-10
6-2
5-11
6-2
6-1
5-10
5-10
6-0
6-1
5-9
5-11
6-3
6-2
6-3
6-4
5-11
6-2
6-0
6-3
6-0
59
6-2
5-11
5-10
6-1
6-2
6-3
6-3

47 Mark Hardy WS
47 Kevin Ford SS
48 Charles Missant TE
51 Blair Eklund LB
52 D.J. Lockhart C
53 Joe Alvarez DT
54 Bill Crane LB
55 Jason Malloy LB
57 Shawn Wiza OT
58 Jo Jo Mesa LB
59 Jack Gitler DE
60 Matt Stover OT
60 Jim Kilcoyne DT
61 Mark Ottney OT
62 Brandon Boone C
63 Henry Moultry OT
64 Jeff Hinson OG
65 Mike Weaver OT
66 Matt Steffen P
67 Kevin Kramer C
68 Chris Montgomery G
69 Jake Gaseway C
70 Fred McCants OT
71 Adam Cones G
73 C.R. Moultry OT
76 Jon Garcia OT
77 Mike McCord OT
78 Tim Nichols DT
79 Kyle Ras G
80 Pat Graham WR
81 Marco Wolverton WR
82 Anthony Kiner TE
83 Tyrone Walker WR
84 Walter Stith TE
84 Rob Lindberg LB
85 Tony Scheffler WR
86 Mobolaji Afariogun TE
87 Marlan McClendon WR
87 Jerome Bloodsaw TE
88 Darnell Jennings WR
89 Alex Gardner WR
90 Ernest Osborne DE
91 Ryan lorillo DT
92 Larry King NG
93 Jason Babin - DE
94 Bryan Pinder DT
95 Paul Moersch NG
96 Byungwoo Yun K
97 Chris Browning DE
98 Chad Wangerin NG
98 Anthony Apa K
99 Jeff Westgate DT

6-2
5-11
6-3
6-2
6-4
6-2
5-11
6-1
6-7
5-11
6-2
6-4
6-2
6-5
6-4
6-5
6-2
6-7
6-1
64
6-4
6-3
6-6
6-5
6-6
6-5
6-7
6-3
6-6
6-0
5-10
6-5
6-3
6-8
5-11
6-5
6-4
6-0
6-2
6-3
6-0
6-5
6-3
6-4
6-3
6-2
6-4
5.11
6-2
6-4
5-7
65

180
185
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263
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238
245
305
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334
270
318
197
289
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344
273
330
334
288
271
281
180
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244
190
231
221
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238
174
230
200
186
231
285
277
237
275
275
195
235
298
185
267

Letdowns are a fact of life in
sports. So often, a team that is com-
ing off of a highly-anticipated, emo-
tionally-charged matchup is ripe for
the pickings in its next game, when it
faces a team of significantly lower
profile.
A shining example of this arose in
1997, when Louisiana State knocked
off then-No. 1 Florida in a national-
ly-televised Saturday night game in
Baton Rouge.
The Tigers skyrocketed in the
polls, but they spent a little too much
time patting themselves on the back
and were embarrassed at home by
Mississippi the next week.
Michigan faces a similar situation
this weekend when the Wolverines
face Western Michigan. In its last
game, Michigan journeyed to Seattle
to play Washington in a game with
major national implications.
The Wolverines outplayed the
Huskies in virtually every facet of
the game and were driving for a
potential game-clinching field goal
in the fourth quarter before the
unthinkable happened - readers will
be spared a rehash of the nightmare
which took place.
Although it lost, Michigan turned
a lot of heads around the country. All
of a sudden, a team rife with ques-
tion marks looked like a team that
could win the Big Ten. So, will there
be a letdown for the Wolverines this
week? Not likely.
"It's an opportunity for Western to
beat Michigan," Michigan coach
Lloyd Carr said. "There's a lot of
things in this game Western to play,
they have a lot of pride. We're fore-
warned about that."
Despite the Broncos' 31-0 shel-
lacking at the hands of Virginia Tech
two weeks ago, they are still a tough
matchup for Michigan.
Aside from the obvious state brag-
ging rights at stake, the Broncos run
- drumroll, please - the spread
offense.
Those words still cause night
sweats for Michigan fans. Anyone
who watched Purdue. and
Northwestern torch the Wolverines
last year, and Miami (Ohio) have
success this year, knows that
Michigan still has trouble with the -
spread.
More than anything else, to run the
spread effectively, a team needs a
poised quarterback. Western
Michigan has that in senior Jeff
Welsh, who struggled mightily
against a swarming Virginia Tech
defense but threw five touchdown
passes the previous week against
Illinois State.
Welsh figures to give Michigan's
defense some trouble, but the
Wolverines don't seem worried.
"You're going to see a lot of teams
go to that and see a lot of defenses
figure it out," defensive tackle Jake
Frysinger said. "I'm not going to say
it's a fad but we're going to be pre-
pared for whatever they throw at us."
Even if Michigan's defense strug-

Calvin Bell and Ronald Bellamy need to p
gles against the Broncos' spread, th
Wolverines' offense could compen
sate.
In raucous Husky Stadium
Michigan demonstrated an ability 1
shut out the crowd noise and pu
together multiple time-consumir
drives.
A big chunk of the credit goes 1
the running game. Tailbacks Chr
Perry and B.J. Askew ran right at ti
gut of Washington's defense - i.
All-America tackle Larry Tripple
- and repeatedly kept the chair
moving.
Considering that Virginia Tec
piled up 271 yards rushing again
the Broncos, Perry and Askew shoul
have continued success on th-
ground this week.
"Either one of those guys ai

Is

Every night from 11p.m. until close, Charley's features...
Pitchers ................$3.00
Bud Light, Molson, Killian's, or Honey Brown
Margaritas ...................$2.25
Regular or Strawbeny Margaritas
Beer ........................$2.25
22 oz. Bud Light, Molson, Killian's, or Honey Brown
Iced Teas .....................$3.25
All of our Iced Tea'vaneties, 22oz.
Also featured after 11p.m. is a limited menu of appetizers,
burgers, and sandwiches at special midnight hour prices.
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1140 South University at Church 668-8411

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Offer expires 11130/01

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