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September 20, 2001 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2001-09-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

oiTS

michigandaily.com/sports

THURSDAY
SEPTEMBER 20, 2001

1OA~

Blue ready to return to field

By Matt Kramer
For the Daily
It's been 11 days since the Michi-
gan field hockey team has played a
competitive match. But don't think

ready to get back into the competitive
atmosphere.
"It's been a while since we have
competed against anyone but our-
selves," Powers said. "Our hearts

weren't in it

that the Wolverines are feel-
ing rusty.
"We have had some time
off, but we are definitely
back on track and ready to
get things started with the
Big Ten and defend our
championship from last
y'bar," Michigan coach Mar-
cia Pankratz said. "Emotion-
ally we are doing pretty well
too."
Michigan hosts Massa-

2IS WEEKEND
OCKER FIELD
Who: Friday, Michigan (4-2)
vs. UMass (1-2); Sunday vs.
Indiana (1-4)
When: 4 p.m. tomorrow,
Noon Sunday
Latest: Friday's game vs.
Massachusetts is Michi-
gan's last nonconfer-
ence game.

last week. But now we
are really looking for-
ward to getting back
into action."
Instead of playing
their eight scheduled
games before this
weekend's matches,
the Wolverines (4-2)
now only have Fri-
day's game ag.ainst
Massachusetts (1-2) to
prepare for the begin-
ning of Big Ten play.

off to a rocky 1-4 start.
"We don't take any team lightly,"
sophomore forward April Fronzoni
said. "But we have high expectations
of ourselves and we're very excited to
get going with Big Ten play."
Although the game is between
Michigan and Indiana, it's safe to say
that the people of Oak Park and Lake
Bluff, Ill. will be keeping a close eye
on the action.
That's because five players sched-
uled to play in the game are from the
same Oak Park River Forest High
School - Michigan's Powers, Jessie
Veith and Erin Kopelow and the
Hoosiers' Lindsey Nealis and Mar-
garet Dunne.
Michigan's Molly Maloney, along
with three Hoosiers, attended Lake
Forest High School in Lake Bluff.
"The two of them are both fresh-
men and I think of them as friends
from home who I used to play soccer
with also," Powers said with a smile
in reference to the her former team-
mates from Oak Park.
"I will say it's going to be neat for
me to show them what the Big Ten is
like," Powers said. "But hey, I'm not
going to talk any trash."

chusetts and Indiana Friday and Sun-
day, respectively.
The Wolverines, ranked fourth
nationally in the last National Field
Hockey Coaches Association poll,
were scheduled to play two games last
weekend in Connecticut against
Boston College and Connecticut.
Both matches were cancelled due
to last week's terrorist attacks.
So after a few days off, and a few
days of what junior forward Molly
Powers called, "pretty intensive prac-
tices," the Wolverines are more than

Michigan h'as not played Massachu-
setts, an NCAA quarterfinalist last
year, since 1988. That year, the Min-
utemen knocked off the Wolverines 3-
0.
"It's exciting to play a team that we
haven't met before and see their dif-
ferent style of play," Powers said, ".I
think that could help us out."
Fortunately for Michigan, Sunday's
Big Ten opener just happens to be
against an Indiana team that went I-
12 last year - including an 8-0 loss
to Michigan - and has already gotten

4

Junior Molly Powers and the rest of the Wolverines are itching to play something more than an intrasquad scrimmage.

.1

Wolverines enter crucial stretch of schedule
With five of next seven games at home, 'M' has a chance to build momentum

By Rohit Bhave
Daily Sports Writer

Under the lights at Elbel
Friday, the Michigan men
program will begin a stretch
games that will shape
the course of its season.
For the next four weeks,
the Wolverines will play
nonconference teams on
Friday, and take on Big E
Ten opponents on Sun-
day. Prior to their Oct. 7E
meeting against mighty c
Indiana, the young t
Wolverines have an v
opportunity to develop
their identity in some w
games.
Friday's opponent, But
0), has participated in thr
the past five NCAA tourn
Coming off three losses,i
tain that Butler is anticip
first victory against Stev
young program. A school t
tionally recruits heavily i
gan, Butler wants to
statement against the Wolvi
team that has bit heavily
state's talent pool.
While Elbel certainly d
provide the best surface for
Wolverines do have the op

to attract a noisy student crowd at
night.
"With a spirited crowd composed
Field on of unruly college kids, we can estab-
's soccer lish the home field advantage that is
of home so vital to success," Burns said.
Sunday's opponent,
Northwestern (0-2-2),
ELBEL AND VARSITY had a disappointing sea-
FIELD son last year, going win-
Who: Michigan(3-1)vs. less. However, new
Notwsern(0-2-2)ich . coach Tim Lenahan is
Northwestern (0-2-2)
When: 7:00 p.m. Friday at bringing in a tenacious
Elbel Field, 2:00 p.m. Sun- attitude. With an
day at Varsity Field. increased commitment
Latest: Both games are from their athletic
winnable for the 31 department, the Wildcats
wolverines. might punish overconfi-
vinnable dent conference opponents this year.
In their preparation, the Wolverines
ler (0-3- have taken notice of the Wildcats'
ee out of more intense style.
naments. "We have prepared for a team that
it is cer- will play very defensively and fight
ating its tooth and nail for a goal," Burns
e Burns' said.
hat tradi- The Northwestern game will be
n Michi- played at the Varsity Soccer Field,
make a which has a better playing surface
terines, a than Elbel. As a result, the Wolver-
into the ines will look to establish a more
controlled game plan against the
does not Wildcats. Michigan wants to
play, the methodically advance the ball to
portunity upfield targets, then isolate the

defense by pushing the ball wide.
Though the team wanted to com-
pete very badly last weekend, the
time off has given the coaching staff
an opportunity to improve its squad.
Because Michigan is predicated on
being a strong ball possession team,
the 12-day break has allowed the
team to build on that philosophy
with speed-of-play and development
games.
"[The drills are] something the
players enjoy because they are chal-
lenged -mentally to play faster then
they are accustomed," Burns said.
The practice time has also allowed
the coaching staff to evaluate the
skill development of its players.
Kevin Taylor has emerged as the
torch-bearer of the defense, while

J.J. Kern is thriving after"a switch to
his natural position, left-midfield.
Burns would like the backbone of
his team to step up, beginning with
sweeper Taylor, goalkeeper Joe
Zawacki and stopper Mike White.
The Wolverines' possession attack
needs to be finished by central mid-
fielder Knox Cameron along with
forwards Robert Turpin and Jody
Keeling. Turpin especially should be
able to break out this year in' terms
of goal production.
After last week's horrifying
events, the Wolverines are craving
an opportunity to play. Following a
week of sharp, intense and attentive
practice, Michigan wants to launch
into the meat of its schedule with
some strong wins this weekend.

4

Upcoming Schedule
This weekend, the Michigan men's soccer team starts a home stretch that will
determine its Big Ten standings.
Date Opponent Location Time
9/28 Dayton Pioneer High School 7:00 p.m.
9/30 Western Michigan *Varsity Soccer Field 3:30 p.m.
10/3 at dakland U, Rochester, MI 4:00 p.m.
10/7 Indiana . * Varsity Field 2:00 p.m.
10/11 Bowling Green Salem High School 7:00 p.m.
10/14 at Michigan State East Lansing, Mi 2:30 p.m.
10/21 Wisconsin *Varsity Field 2:00 p.m.
* On State Street between Dewey Street and Granger Street.
Baseball to contribute
$1OM to relief fund

FILE PHOTO
Kevin Taylor (No. 2) and his Michigan teammates are entering a very important
series of home games in their schedule.

d.

t

The Associated Press
Major League Baseball and its play-
ers' association contributed $5 million
each yesterday to establish a relief fund
to aid victims of last week's terrorist
attacks.
The MLB-MLBPA Disaster Relief
Fund will distribute money after con-
sulting with governmental and charita-
ble relief organizations.
Many baseball teams and players are
making separate contributions.
"All of Major League Baseball is
deeply saddened by the loss of life and
the terrible damage wrought by the ter-
rorist attacks that struck our nation,"
commissioner Bud Selig said.
"The events of Sept. 11 left all of us
horrified, and none of us untouched,"
said Don Fehr, executive director of the
union. "Baseball and America have
always gone together, and now, as the
country moves forward to relieve the
suffering and heal the wounds, everyone
in the baseball community wants to go
along."
The New York Mets said manager
Bobby Valentine, his coaching staff and
the 34 players on the team's active ros-
ter would contribute their salaries from

donating $250,000 - roughly the
equivalent of one day's pay - to the
Heroes' Fund, established to help fami-
lies of the New York firefighters, police
officers and Port Authority employees
killed in the attacks. Colorado players
donated nearly $60,000, which, with
matching funds, is expected to total
about $144,000.
The NHL Players Association donat-
ed $500,000 to aid families of New
York City firefighters and police offi-
cers.
"The members of the NHLPA want-
ed to make a donation. to support the
families of the victims of last week's
terrorist attacks in New York City,"
NHLPA president Trevor Linden said.
"This donation is in addition to the vari-
ous contributions we are making with
our teammates and our teams."
NASCAR is pledging its help
through a variety of paint schemes and
donations. A combined 37 Winston Cup
and Busch series drivers informed
NASCAR yesterday of special patriotic
paint schemes they will have on their
cars this weekend in Dover, Del.
In addition, 12 drivers have joined
Rusty Wallace and Jeremy Mayfield's
call to donate money for every lap they

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