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December 12, 2001 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2001-12-12

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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, December 12, 2001- 7

$100 milion spent on recruzting annually

ADMISSIONS
Continued from Page 1
receives from that area. Spencer compared it to a
view of the earth from space - lights can be seen in
the most populous parts of the world.
"We try to go where the lights are," Spencer said,
adding, "That does not mean to say we neglect any
areas of the state or the country."
Spencer said the University tries to make personal
visits' to each in-state high school at least once every
two years.
He estimated the University spends about $100
million in recruiting every year.
"There's never an 'i' we won't dot or a 't' we
won't cross to identify students who will be success-
ful at the University of Michigan, no matter what
their background," Spencer said. "There may be
some (universities) that do as much but few who do
more."
He added that counselors focus not only on geo-
graphic diversity but on the diversity of interests and
hobbies prospective students express in their applica-
tions.
"This is not a school of GPAs and test scores,"

Spencer said.
Spencer said that 85 percent of accepted students
have done community service, 50 percent play a
musical instrument and 10 percent have started their
own business.
Another way the University recruits students from
underrepresented areas involves the efforts of alumni.
Alumni travel to college fairs at different schools
in their communities to advise prospective students.
They also have an effect on prospective applicants
when they drive with a University of Michigan
bumper sticker or fly a maize-and-blue flag outside
their homes.
"If I'm a kid and I see that, that's going to res-
onate," Spencer said.
Most students hear about the University because
of its national reputation as a leader in many differ-
ent areas, Spencer said.
"We've always been a very, very popular universi-
ty," he added.
Joyce Williams, career center director at Ann
Arbor Pioneer High School, said students at the
school are able to form their own opinion of the Uni-
versity simply by living in the same city. The campus
is close enough that students can take advantage of a

number of experiences and events there.
Williams said a University counselor visits the
school and is available to answer students' questions
throughout the year.
Anne Young, counseling department head at Troy
High School in Oakland County, said a University of
Michigan counselor comes to her area for a college
night every fall.
"She is a very, very good spokesperson for the
University," Young said.
"U of M comes up a lot," Young added. "I think
the school speaks for itself, the reputation of the
University of Michigan."
A lot of students at the high school have parents
who attended college, which generally makes them
more aware of higher education.
Pat Cleary, a college counselor at Stuyvesant High
School in New York City, said her students have usu-
ally heard of the University prior to the application
process, and students who have friends and family
who attended the University create an additional net-
work.
More applications come to the University from
Stuyvesant than any other high school in the country
outside Ann Arbor.

SOLOWAY
Continued from Page 1
support you while on the path of
learning who you are and teach you
the skills you will need to interact
with people throughout your life,"
wrote another student in a nomina-
tion.
About 520 students nominated
various professors for the Golden
Apple Award and about 15 of those
nominations were for Soloway, said
Engineering junior, Brian Netter.
But the group of students that
nominates the winner, Students Hon-
oring Outstanding UniWersity Teach-

ers, does not only consider the num-
ber of nominations but also thequal-
ity of the comments professors
receive.
"From engineers naming a profes-
sor, that is quite a few," Netter said.
"What struck me most was how
inspired the students were to chal-
lenge themselves."
In honor of winning the Golden
Apple Award, Soloway will give his
"ideal last lecture" Jan. 22 at the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater and be
awarded S1,000 cash.
When Soloway was informed that he
would get to give the lecture, he jok-
ingly protested, "But I don't lecture."

REGENTS
Continued from Page 1
host events, which might defeat the pur-
pose of a study break for some students.
But Regent Rebecca McGowan (D-
Ann Arbor) said she supports the pro-
posal.
"I'nf all for it. The time has come,"
she said yesterday.
Regent Olivia Maynard (D-
Goodrich) said she was also in favor of
the proposal.
"I'm not saying it's going to be a
unanimous decision, but I don't think it
will have any problem passing," she
said. "Matt really did his homework."
The proposed break would be Mon-
day and Tuesday, Oct. 14 and 15 in next
year's fall calendar. To make up for
missed time, classes would start the day
after Labor Day - Tuesday, Sept. 3
next year - instead of the following
day. This would shorten the University's
Welcome Week by one day but would
have no effect on the ending date for
the michigan daily
FAMILIES NEEDED! Two Sisters OR
Two Brothers (one a current or ex-smoker,
the other a non-smoker) and their living
biological parents are needed for a study on
smoking and genetics. African-Americans
with 3 siblings can participate without
Itparents. Each family earns $50. Call
1-800-742-2300, #6311. No travel necessary!
GREAT CASH FOR a morning person!
Driver needed to Redford, Mon.-Fri., meeting
place in morning neg. in Manchester/Ann
Arbor area. Start after Jan. 1. (734) 428-8638.

"I'm not adverse to the changes in
the bylaws at the moment," McGowan
said, adding that she has not heard any
opposition to the proposal aside from
SACUA's protests.

classes. Classes would end Wednesday,
Dec. 11, and the last day of finals is
scheduled to be Friday, Dec. 20.
The proposal would not affect the
winter term.
The regents will also be asked tomor-
row to approve changes to the athletic
bylaws proposed by University Presi-
dent Lee Bollinger.
The changes would modify the name
of the Board in Control to be the Advi-
sory Board on Intercollegiate Athletics.
The plan has come under fire in the
Senate Advisory Committee on Univer-
sity Affairs. SACUA Chair Moji
Navvab plans to speak to the regents
and submit a letter expressing SACUA's
concerns.
"Basically, our concerns are that we
do not want to dilute the faculty gover-
nance in the board of control," said
SACUA Vice Chair Jack Gobetti, a
Dentistry professor, who added that the

power of the two students and two
alumni on the board would also be
diminished.
The Board in Control has a say in
financial and academic matters in the
University's athletic program. The
Advisory Board on Intercollegiate Ath-
letics would be purely advisory.
The changes would give the presi-
dent of the University the final say in
athletic matters and would give the fac-
ulty control over only those matters
related to academics. The modified
Board in Control would no longer have
power over the athletic director.
Gobetti said he feels the changes
would leave open the possibility that.
the athletic director could nominate fac-
ulty members who might not put stu-
dent athletes' academic interests first.
"The athletic director, by nature of
the beast, is looking at an athlete who
happens to be a student," he said.

UM STAFF & STUDENTS needed! You
are needed for a study on the events of 9/l1.
Earn $7 for 20 mi. email survey. Go to
www.umich.edu/-~syrhee/911
UNIVERSITY CATERING hiring positive
and personable people for wait staff
positions. Will train. Varied shifts avail.
Call 764-2142.
WORK STUDY POSITION IN SCHOOL
OF NURSING business and finance office.
Develop interpersonal, organizational,
professional, office, and computer skills.
Responsibilities include light typing,
copying, filing, telephone coverage, and mail
sorting. 1-2 students needed. 58-10 per hour.
Contact Reva Frye at 764-8153.

SPRING BREAK! Flight Concerns & Sail
from Florida, spend 5 Day in Bahamas from
$279! Includes most meals! Get Group - Go
Free! springbreaktravel.com
1-800-678-6386
***ACT NOW! GUARANTEE THE BEST
SPRING BREAK PRICES! SOUTH
PADRE, CANCUN, JAMAICA,
BAHAMAS, ACAPULCO, FLORIDA &
MARDI GRAS. REPS NEEDED... TRAVEL
FREE, EARN $$. GROUPS DISCOUNT
FOR 6+. 800-838-8203 OR
WWW.LEISURETOURS.COM.
ACAPULCO'S #1 Spring Break Company,
BIANCHI-ROSSI TOURS, wants you to Go
Loco in Acapulco! Book Spring Break
2002's Hottest Destination with the only
company specializing in Acapulco!
Call 1-800-875-4525 or log onto
www.bianchi-rossi.com
Travel Free-ask how!

HOUSE CLEANER
Experienced, reliable,
References needed. Close
day/wk. Call 763-1592.

NEEDED.
meticulous.
to campus. 1/2

LACROSSE OFFICIALS WANTED for
spring season -men's and women's lacrosse.
Around $45/game depending on level.
Lacrosse experience helpful, not mandatory.
Training will be provided. Women's refs.
I contact Elaine at ETORVINEN@aol.com
Mens refs. contact Clark at
michlaxref@home.com
LIFEGUARDS NEEDED!! at Dexter
Community Pool. Starting pay is $8.25.
Please call (734) 426-1935, John Robinson,
Pool Director.
LOOKING FOR A
BREAK FROM CLASSES?
We need Bio, Chem, Biochem, ChE,
Pharm Sci or related sci people to join
A U-connected biotech co near campus.
Research a new eye drug delivery system:
Polymers, lasers, enzyme immunoassay,
And work with a MD on human subjects.
Start now, full time for 1 or 2 years.
E-mail: admin@eyelabgroup.com
NEED A FEW EXTRA BUCKS?
Church needs a student to: change light
bulbs, run errands, spot clean, do basic yard
work, etc. Must have own transportation. Be
avail. 2 days/wk Tues.-Sat. anytime between
loam and 5pm 5-15hrs/wk $7.50/hour or
better. 769-4157.
REASEARCH DATA COLLECTION
AND PROCESSING
The University of Michigan, Survey
Research Center Survey Lab is recruiting
people with excellent communication skills
and interest/background in the
social/economic sciences to join a team
collecting national public opinion telephone
interviews. Candidates need to be highly self-
directed with a professional telephone
manner for conducting research interviews.
Experience with IBM compatible computers
helpful. Keyboard/typing skills required.
Must be available to work a minimum of 16-
20 hours per week. Day, evening and
weekend schedules are available.
Competitive wages - 'starting at $9.50/hr.
Hiring will begin in Januray 2002.
Apply immediately in person, weekdays
8 am-9pm, Saturday loam - 6pm and Sunday
12pm-9pm at the University of Michigan,
Survey Research Center, Survey Services
Laboratory, 2058 S. State Street, Ann Arbor.
The University of Michigan is an Equal
Opportunity, Affirmative Action employer.
ROMULUS SCHOOLS are seeking an
after-school Drama teacher and a foreign
language teacher. $15/hr. 4 hrs/wk. (734)
722-1050 x273. strongd @romulus.k 12.mi.us
SCOREKEEPERS is now hiring Cooks.

Ir

AFTERSCHOOL caregiver for engaging 10
yr. old. 2-5 days a week 3:30-5:30. West side
near campus. Experience, Reliably, and
interest in children. Car Desirable for some
afterschool activity trans. Pay generous.
With some hours flexibility. 994-0810.
ASST. TEACHER (LOVE TODDLERS).
Cook, clean, organize, enjoy pets and
outside. 9-2pm or F/T. $8-10/hr. 769-2795.
BABYSITTER NEEDED for I yr. old girl
after school. Flex. sched., good pay. Car
needed. Call 668-1332.
BABYSITTER Wed. 7:30-3pm. Reliable,
drive 6 yr. old to school & stay w/ 3 yr. old.
Start Jan. 2002. kathaikens@mediaone.net
DRIVER NEEDED to pick up 2 kids (12
&14) for two schools in Ann Arbor. M/W
1:30 to 3:15pm T/Th/F 2:15 -3:15. Need own
car $75/wk. 995-2447 eves. 615-4507 day.
Needed Jan 7-mid June.
FREE ROOM IN lovely home in exchange
for child care. Private entrance and kitchen
privileges. Walking distance to U of M
campus and only one block to Nichols
Arboretum. For details, call Nan at 332-1662.
LOVING BABYSITTER for 3-yr. old boy.
Non-smkr., own transportation, 1-yr
commitment, 6-8 hrs./wk., afternoons,
$10/hr. Westside Ann Arbor. Call Cathy @
623-8460.
SITTER NEEDED IN E. Ann Arbor home.
Occas. eves. & wknds. for 2 yr. old. Over 18,
'exp. & own car pref. 734-975-8866.
WINTER CHILDCARE substitutes: work
according to your schedule. Great job for
psych and education students. Fun job.
Bilingual encouraged. Call St. Paul Early
Childhood Center: 668-0887.

SPRING BREAX
up to 7 night 1'$7 l Per
room package student
Surcharge for Peak Spring Break weeks
BIGGEST POOL DECK PARTIES
'r I FE
Tropical BeachesVideorochures
of Florida & Reservations
LIVE WEB CAM OF DAYTONA BEACH
. S -

NEED 2 TICKETS to Garrison Keillor on
12/15. Call (231) 947-2214.

8yOAS bna&k
Panama City Beach
from $39/night
$215/week
$9.75/person/day
Sandpiper Beacon beach
resort the "fun place"! Home
of the world's longest keg
partyW
Dlrink draft beer all week long

.r/W'

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