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January 12, 2001 - Image 11

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2001-01-12

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, January 12, 2001-11

agrabs running
back recruit Baraka
Kelly Baraka, an all-state running back
from Portage Northern, will play at
Michigan next season.
Baraka turned down Notrc Dame,
Michigan State and Nebraska among
others. Baraka said he would have the
opportunity to play as a freshman.
"The coaches at Michigan, Lloyd Carr
and Andy Moeller, told me I would have
a very good opportunity to play early and
that I could really offer a lot to the pro-
gram," Baraka told the Kalamazoo
Gazette. "They told me, Anthony
Thomas is leaving and somebody has to
fill his shoes.'
"They told me, '(freshman running
back) Chris Perry is a great runner, but
you're faster. He's bigger, but you have
better hands. There are things you pos-
sess that he doesn't and a couple of things
he possesses that you don't."'
The six-foot, 190-pound back won
Michigan's 100-meter championship this
past spring in track and etched the 200-
meter crown the year before.
-Staff reports
Fargas chooses
*Southern Cal
Former Michigan running back
Justin Fargas has decided to transfer
to Southern Cal. He will be eligible
to play in the 2002 season.
Fargas broke his leg in the first
game of his sophomore season and
was never able to crack the
Michigan running back rotation
-when he returned the next year.
Fargas recorded 10 tackles this sea-
son after switching over to safety
and special teams after the Illinois
game.
For his career at Michigan, Fargas
rushed for 360 yards on 95 carries.
-Staff reports
Friday. Jan. 12
Women's swimming and diving hosts
Wolverine Invitational, 6p.m.
Women's gymnastics vs. Oregon
State, 7 p.m.
Hockey at Ohio State, 7:35 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 13
Women's swimming and diving hosts
Wolverine Invitational, all day
Men's gymnastics at Windy City
Invitational (Chicago), 7 p.m. CST
Men's basketball at Illinois, 7 p.m. CST
Hockey at Ohio State, 7 p.m.
en's tennis at Big Ten Singles
Championships (East Lansing), all day
Men's track and field hosts Indiana
dual, all day.
Women's track and field hosts
Indiana dual, all day.
Sunday. Jan. 14
Wrestling at Wendy's Classic
(Ashland, Ohio), noon
Women's basketball vs. Ohio
OWtate, 2 p.m.
Men's tennis at Big Ten Singles
Championships (East Lansing), all
day

JUST ONE OF THE GUYS
Olympian and former All-American Kevin Sullivan
returns as assistant coach for men's track and field
By Shawn Kemp Daily Sports Writer

Racing around the Olympic sta-
dium track in Sydney,
Australia, Canadian Kevin
Sullivan proved himself to be the
fifth-best miler in the world.
And now,just four months after his
Olympic debut, Sullivan can be
found playfully slapping the backs of
daunted freshmen on the Michigan
men's track team after pacing a blis-
tering workout of repeat hills and
multiple 600-meter sprints.
A former Wolverine and current
assistant track coach, Sullivan trotted
around the worn, blue indoor track
this past Monday while Michigan
head track coach Ron Warhurst
observed his prodigy.
"He's still my kid," Warhurst said.
And it's true. Although Sullivan
may assist Warhurst in developing
workouts and coaching the distance
runners, Warhurst is still his coach
for upcoming events like the 2001
World Track and Field
Championships and the 2004
Olympic Games.
Sullivan, who is currently spon-
sored by Reebok, "coaches by exam-
ple," Warhurst said. "Out on the road,
he comes after the kids and says,
'hey, you've got to run harder."'
The bonuses of having an interna-
tionally known runner to push ath-
letes in practice and share his knowl-
edge in running can set intimidating
standards. For 18- and 19-year-old
freshmen, training with an Olympian
creates added pressure to keep up in
practice and show their prowess.
"I think the younger guys were in
awe of him," Warhurst said. "He's a
miler, but he can run 16 miles at 5:30
pace, and they're going, I'm a dis-
tance runner, but I can only run 10
miles at 5:30 pace."
But, Warhurst said his younger
runners sometimes forget that
Sullivan is six years older than them,
and his experience at an elite level far

surpasses that of a first-year student-
athlete at Michigan.
"If they take a step back and ana-
lyze what's going on, they can see
that he's been there because he went
through the growing pains as a
youngster, too," Warhurst said._
During his reign at Michigan
(1993-1998), the 14-time All-
American in track and cross country
racked up a collection of awards and
titles. Sullivan was a four-time Big
Ten cross country champion, making
him just the third Big Ten athlete to
accomplish such a feat.
He also won the NCAA indoor
mile in both 1995 and 1997, and was
a member of the 1995 distance med-
ley quartet which, at the time, held
the world record.
Sullivan's most recent athletic
accomplishments include his perfor-
mance in the finals of the 1500-meter
run at the 2000 Olympics. His time of
3:35.50 was good for fifth place.
But Sullivan's status as an elite
runner has not hindered his involve-
ment with his alma mater. Rather, he
uses his experiences at Michigan,
coupled with his knowledge of racing
in the professional circuit, to further
develop Michigan's track athletes.
"Even though I'm not in school
anymore, I'm only a couple years
removed from it," Sullivan said. "I
know what they're going through -
the troubles they have and the pres-
sures they have. I just try and be there
for support for them."
Although Sullivan tries to "be like
one of the guys on the team," he still
has assistant coaching responsibili-
ties. While Warhurst devises most of
the workouts, Sullivan has input as to
what the team actually does during
the week.
"There's more responsibility of
keeping the guys in order and in
shape, and making sure they're doing
the things they should be doing dur-

SUCCESS IN ALL FIELDS
Kevin Sullivan not
only excelled on
the track, but also
in the classroom.
Throughout his five
years at Michigan,
he managed a list
of academic acco-
lades which rival
his athletic accom-
plishments. Sullivan
plishments.
- Received NCAA 1998 Today's Top
VIII award
- Holds a BSE degree in civil engi-
neering
- Named to the Academic Dean's
List five times
- Selected as the GTE Spring At-
Large Academic All-American of the
Year in1998
- Academic All-Big Ten Conference
honoree
While training for his upcoming com-
petitions in the 2001 World
Championships and the 2004
Olympic Games, Sullivan currently
resides in Ann Arbor with his wife,
Karen Harvey. Harvey is a former
Michigan cross country and track
and field All-American and the
Michigan women's track and field
assistant coach.
ing the week, during practice, and off
the field as well," Sullivan said.
But while Sullivan holds the title
of assistant, Warhurst is still his
coach, and Sullivan knows it.
"He's'always looking out for me,"
Sullivan said with a smile. "He's still
my coach, so I'm under his supervi-
sion all the time."
So while the assistant coach push-
es his athletes during a 10-mile road.
run at a scorching sub six-minute
pace, Sullivan will still be Warhurst's
kid.

,, eY alf
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e..... r...~,,, I M

3.AD QUINN/Dau
Alayne Ingram drives past Penn State's Ashley Luke as Michigan ended its
losing streak last night.

I

LIONS
Continued from Page 10
picked up three first-half steals that
turned into transition points before
Penn State knew what hit them.
Michigan boxed out to the tune of a
47-33 edge in reboundin. The
Wolverines were yelling, high-fiving
and cheering. They were doing sorne-
thing they hadn't done in a while.
They were getting excited.
"We had to put up a good fight and
a lot of energy and a lot of enthusi-
asm to be able to play with them,"
Anne Thorius said. "If you have it
from the beginning and you keep it
going and you make the big plays, the
team s just going to continue to be
excited."
With Penn State bringing in four
starters who average double-digit
scoring, it was hard for Michigan to
pick one player to shut down. But for-
ward Maren Walseth must have felt
like she was the chosen one. She was
held to 1-of-6 shooting from the floor
and no offensive rebounds. Walseth
spent a good portion of the game
picking herself up offthe court as she
was pushed around on both ends.
"Every time she touched the ball
she had two people on her," Guevara
said. "We did a decent job with slid-
ing our feet, so she was shooting into
two people."

YESTERr
Penn State (62)

DAY'S GAME

FG FT REB
MIN MA MA OT A F PTS
Shepherd 38 816 23 14 1 0 20
Waleth 37 16 68 05 3 3 8
Barnes 15 4 9 1I1 4 5 1 5 9
Carr 24 08 00 24 3 0 0
Mazzante 33 715 11 12 1 4 17
Shook 3 0 1 00 00 0 0 0
Brungo 9 1 3 0-0 00 3 3 3
Upshaw 19 02 2 2 3 7 2 3 2
Luke 22 16 00 12 3 2 3
Totals 200 22-62 12-1515-33 14 20 62
FG%: .333. FTo: .800. 3-point FG: 6 21,-286
(Shepherd 2 4, Mazzante 2 6, Brungo 12, Luke 1-6,
Carr 0 31 Blocks: 3 (Bames 2. Walseth). Steals: 13
(Luke 3, Shepherd 3, Walseth 3, Mazzanie 2, Brungo,
Carr) Turnovers: 12 (Luke 3, Shepherd 3, Walseth 3,
Brungo 2). Technical fouls: none.
MICHIGAN (71)
FG FT REB
MIN MA MA o A F PTS
Goodlow 30 3 11 2 3 29 1 3 8
Gandy 31 47 14 4-5 1 2 9
Bes 34 9 12 24 3 11 0 3 21
Thorius 37 26 33 1 4 9 1 7
Ingram 37 710 01 04 4 1 14
Jara 0+ 0-0 0,0 0-0 0 0 0
Leary 0+ 0-0 1 2 00 0 0 1
Schumacher 4 02 00 00 0 0 0
Oesterle 10 12 00 0-1 1 1 2
Robinson 0+ 00 0-0 00 0 0 0
Dykhouse 1 00 0-0 0 0 0 0 0
Smith 16 25 5 6 2 2 0 2 9
Totals 200 28-55 14-2316-47 16 15 71
FG%:.509. FTO/o:+609. 3-point FG: 1 3, 333 (Bies).
Blocks: 1 (Bies). Steals: S (Ingram 3, Gandy, Thorius)..
Turnovers: 19 (Smith 4, Ingram 3, Gandy 3, Goodlow
3, Oosterle 3, Jara, Leary, Thorius) Technical fouls:
none.

Penn State..
Michigan....

29 33 - 62
.38 33 --71

At: Crisler Arena
Attendance: 1,091

Personal pride on line at Big Tens

EARLY NFL DRAFT ENTRIES

By Albert Kim
Daily Sports Writer
It will be every man for himself at the Varsity Tennis
Center this weekend, as Michigan hosts the start of the
Big Ten season - the Big Ten Singles Championships.
With no team scoring, each player will
play for personal - and a little school - TMWV
"The Big Ten is loaded with some out- W
standing players and I expect it to be a chmo nsp l
wide open event," Michigan coach Mark Wws w.t
Mees said. suday aiM
The tournament will run from Saturday t Thi i
to Tuesday. Michigan's best chance of a tw Jits an h
top performer may come from junior event
Henry Beam, the 39th-ranked singles
player in the country.
He finished the fall individual season with a 9-3
record, and hopes to lead the Wolverines to a Big Ten
championship.
The team consists of four juniors, three sophomores
and only one freshman. Although there are no seniors on

the team, most of the players have Big Ten experience,
and Mees doesn't need to worry about losing anybody
after this season.
The Wolverines have no injuries to note, and all eight
players on the roster will compete this weekend.
For many players, it will be the first time they've

1i415 G' I
SirVes
tomrow
lmday tt
th fr,

played in a couple of months, and for Mees, it
will be a good time to see how his players
have progressed.
"It is always interesting to see how every-
one comes out of the blocks in the second
half of the season. It usually takes a tourna-
ment or two to get back into feeling comfort-
able playing matches again," Mees said.
The Wolverines may get a chance to see
their newest player, Brett Baudinet from the
Cook Islands near New Zealand, in action. In

Player
Keith Adams
Hakim Akbar
Michael Bennett
Josh Booty
John Capel
Quincy Carter
Nate Clements
Ronney Daniels
Heath Evans
Robert Ferguson
Jamar Fletcher
Renaldo Hill
Rudi Johnson
Willie Middlebrooks
Freddie Mitchell
Ryan Pickett
Dominic Raiola
Koren Robinson
Justin Smith
David Terrell
Ja'Mar Toombs
Kenyatta Walker
Gerard Warren
Reggie White
Adrian Wilson

Position
LB
S
RB
QB
WR
QB
CB
WR
FB
WR
CB
CB
RB
CB
WR
DT
C
WR
DE
WR
FB
OT
DT
RB
SS

School
Clemson
Washington
Wisconsin
LSU
Florida
Georgia
Ohio State
Auburn
Auburn
Texas A&M
Wisconsin
Michigan St.
Auburn
Minnesota
UCLA
Ohio State
Nebraska
N.C. State
Missouri
Michigan
TexasaA&M
Florida
Florida
Oklahoma St.
North Carolina St.

Year
Jr.
Jr.
Jr.
Jr.
So.
Jr.
Jr.
So.
Jr.
Jr.
Jr.
Sr.
Jr.
Jr.
Jr.
Jr.
Jr.
So.
Jr.
Jr.
J r.
Jr.
Jr.
J r.
Jr.

Yesterday 's results
No. 24 IOWvA 78, No. 8 Illinois 62
No. 20 Arizona 84, WASHINGTON STATE 51
Oregon State, No. 1 STANFORD INC.
UCLA ,No. 18 USC Inc.
NHL
Yesterday's results
CALGARY 2, Nashville 1,
LA KINGS, Buffalo Inc.
SAN JOSE, St. Louis Inc.
Today's games
New York at PITTSBURGH, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at TAMPA BAY, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at TORONTO, 7;30 p.m.
Carolina at FLORIDA, 7:30 p.m.
SMontreal at ATLANTA, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at COLUMBUS, 7:30 p.m.
Colorado at MINNESOTA, 8 p.m.
Detroit at DALLAS, 8:30 p.m.
Vancouver at EDMONTON, 9 p.m.
Buffalo at ANAHEIM, 10:30 p.m.
NBA
Yesterday's results
ATLANTA 107, Golden State 96
Portland 83, CHARLOTTE 70
Orlando 101, NEW JERSEY 87
Houston 76, NEW YORK 75
Milwaukee 102 DALLAS 94
PHoENIx 93, Indiana 85
Today's games
Philadelphia at WASHINGTON, 7 p.m.
Toronto at BosToN, 7:30 p.m.
San Antonio at DETROIT, 8 p.m.
LA Clippers at MINNESOTA, 8 p.m.
Charlotte at CHICAGO, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at DENVER, 9 p.m.
Vancouver at SEATTLE, 10 p.m.
Cleveland at LA LAKERS, 10:30 p.m.
0NFL Playoffs
NFC Championship
Who: Minnesota at New York
Giants- -
When: Sunday,
12:30 p.m.
TV.: Fox

addition, they will have the benefit of playing at home.
"I do think it is an advantage to play at home in that
you are sleeping in your own beds and you are comfort-
able with the speed of the courts and the building," Mees
said. "But, the bottom line is you have to play good solid
tennis to have success in the tournament."

*HilI could have petitioned the NCAA for an additional year of eligibility if he had complet-
ed his undergraduate degree in merchandising management prior to the opening of pre-
season camp in August.

BLOOD
Continued from Page 10
is Ohio State's leading scorer and serving
as captain in Signoretti's absence, the
youthful Buckeyes have nearly half of
their goal production coming from their
freshmen class - including two of their
top three in that category, Umberger and
Steckel.
What the freshmen won't remember
though, is last year's heated confrontation
between the Buckeyes and Michigan in
Columbus, when the largest crowd to
ever watch an NCAA hockey game (17,
343) was also possibly the rudest. The
Ohio State fans littered the Michigan
bench and the ice with YooHoo chocolate
drink. They also reached over the glass,
grabbed some of the Wolverines' sticks
and threw them on the ice.
Michigan players had to fend for
themselves as their coach, Red Berenson,
was on the receiving end of some
obscene gestures.
"Fans just got a little carried away
behind the bench," Berenson said. "I1
think we'll have more security this year."
Last year's game proved that although

Ohio State's hockey program hasn't been
around long enough to establish a consis-
tent rivalry with Michigan, blood boils
when the the they take the ice together.
"I think there's a lot of hatred between
us and them," Michigan senior Josh
Langfeld said. "I don't even think their
coach likes us. There's hatred anywhere
you go between here and Ohio State."
Games played with heavy emotirns
often lead to chippy play, which would
best describe the last meeting between
the two teams in Columbus.
With the teams combining for 40
penalties, the game took more than three
hours to complete and featured a brawl
late in the third period.
But what the Wolverines remember
most is how they made the Buckeyes pay
for their undisciplined play, converting
on 4-of-Il chances on the power play in
its 6-4 victory.
"They're always pretty chippy,"
Langfeld said. "We expect that and hope-
fully we can bury them on the power play
and not retaliate and give them the
chances they need to win the game.
"It's two tough games and we defi-
nitely have to have them."

Joel Siegel, GOOD MORNING AMERICA
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Women's Basketball

Women's Gymnastics
U-M vs. #12 Oregon State
Friday, Jan.12 at 7pm
Cliff Keen Arena
2001 Poster Giveaway!!
*FACULTY/STAFF NIGHT

U-M vs. Ohio State
Sunday, Jan.14 at 2pm

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