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April 16, 2001 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2001-04-16

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LOCAL/STATE

The Michigan Daily - Monday, April 16, 2001-- 3A

T\r

Exams force changes in
students' Easter plans

[Hopwood Awards
to include novelist
National Book Award-winning nov-
alist Andrea Barrett will speak at the
Iopwood Awards Ceremony tomorrow
at 3:30 p.m. at Rackham Auditorium.
The annual Hopwood Awards recog-
nize University graduate and under-
graduate students' poetry, fiction and
nonfiction writing.
Ann Arbor poetry
slam expands
"The Dog Slam": Ann Arbor Poetry
0lam will be held tomorrow from 8
.m. to I 1 p.m. in the IHeidelberg
Rathskeller, at 215 N. Main, fora price
of S4.
This is usually a monthly event, on
-le first Tuesday of every month, but
'due to its popularity, a second night in
the month will be established. "The
Dog Slam" features open mike ses-
sions and a variety of slams, including
theme slams, multiple-voice slams.
*age-prop slams, wrestling-hold slams
and other slams.
Organizers encourage all people in
Ann Arbor to "shed your restraint, col-
lect those enscribbled bar napkins
from your blazer pockets, and grace
our stage with some poetry (or what-
ever loopy folderol you would like to
'fob offas such)."
I Scientist explains
local archaeological
frauds from 1890s
The Michigan Archaeological Soci-
ety will host University archaeology
research scientist Lisa Young Wednes-
day at 7:30 p.m. in room 201 of the
Modern Languages Building.
Young will hold a free discussion
titled "The Soper Frauds and Pseudo-
I ience in Archaeology." She will dis-
cuss fraudulent clay, stone and copper
tablets depicting biblical scenes, dis-
covered in central Michigan in the
1890s.
Poet to read, speak
on family history
Elinor Benedict, will read from her
debut collection, "All That Divides
s," a series of poems exploring her
z i.tural inheritance from a rebel aunt
who left her family to "marry a China-
man" in the 1930s.
All That Divides Us was chosen for
the May Swenson Poetry Award by
Maxine Kumin, a poet who calls Bene-
dicts poetry "clear, direct, yet artful."
Benedict, a Tennessee native, is a
founding editor of Passages North lit-
erary magazine at Northern Michigan
*niversity.
The free reading will be held at
Shaman Drum Bookshop on Thursday
at 8 p.m.. after which Benedict will
sign her work.
Forum on election
reform planned
.A public panel, including state and
federal election officials, will discuss
election reform from 9 a.m. to 1 1:30
*m. Friday in the Michigan League's
Vandenberg Room, sponsored by the
. niversity Department of Communi-
cation Studies, the College of Litera-
tire, Science and the Arts and the
Office of the Vice President for
Research.
Two sessions will make up the pro-
gram, one on the current electoral prac-
tice in Michigan and the vote-by-mail

*ocedures in Oregon. The other session
will focus on the prospects for election
tform in the area of standards of prac-
'hde and the use of computers.
Speakers will include Vicki Ervin,
director of elections in Multnomah
County, Ore.; Chris Thomas, director of
elections in the State of Michigan; Pene-
lope Bonsall, director of Oflice of Elec-
Iion Administration for the Federal
Election Commission: and Craig Don-
santo, director of the Election Crimes
ranch f'or the U.S. Department of Jus-
ice.
University communication studies
Prof. Michael Traugott will moderate
both panel discussions. Traugott is a
nationally known expert on elections,
polling, public opinion, campaign
reform and the impact of the news
media on American politics and voter
behavior.
Comipiled by Dail' StafReporter
Whitney Elliott.

By Shannon Pettyplece
Daily Staff Reporter
Unable to spend the holiday with their families, students
with fast approaching final exams or out of' state families
were forced to celebrate Easter creatively this year.
Engineering freshman Thomas Phillips said he was unable
to spend Easter with his family because he had to study for
his final exams.
"That's one of the reasons I didn't go home, 'cause I knew
if I went home I wouldn't be able to get any work done and I
have to study," he said.
Phillips' holiday celebration schedule was also different
this year because he was at school instead of home.
"I stayed out till 5 in the morning watching movies and
stuff, then I slept till 5 in the afternoon," Phillips said.
LSA freshman Erin Ealba said finals prevented her from
celebrating like she has in the past and that it was difficult
not to be able to spend time with her family.
"Normally I just go out to dinner and stuff." Ealba said. "I
didn't do anything today cause I had finals -- I have like
three things due tomorrow."
LSA sophomore Kindra Coleman decided not to trav-
el home for the holiday, but said she was still able to
enjoy a traditional Easter with a family from her
church.
"I went to church with one of my friends and after church
I went to dinner with one of the church families." Coleman
said. "We watched the New York/Philly game - - your typi-

cal African-American Easter . then we ate dinner and then
I went home."
Coleman said although she was able to enjoy her Easter
Sunday the conflict between exams and the holiday have
made it diflicult to prepare for finals.
"When I go to church I'm usually there all day," Coleman
said. "It just takes out one more study day."
Other students said they were able to spend time with their
families, but in a different setting than in previous years.
LSA freshman Brooke Bearup said her family came frotn
Traverse City to spend Easter with her. -
"I went to Kalamazoo and I visited family. We went to
church and had an Easter brunch," Bearup said. "My family
came to visit me instead of me going to visit them."
Although Bearup was able to see her family, she said her
hectic end-of-semester schedule prevented her from spend-
ing the amount of time with her family she would have liked.
"I needed to get back and everyone just wanted me to stay
and chat," said Bearup.
Colleen Batty, an LSA freshman, said having family out
of state made it impossible to spend time with them for East-
er but was able to celebrate with a friend's family.
"My family is in Arizona so I stayed here and went to a
friend's house and had dinner with their family," Batty
said.
Batty also said she felt being away from her family bas
not only difficult for her but also for her parents.
"I'm sure it was difficult for them 'cause I'm thle
youngest" 'Batty said.

ELLIE WHITE Daiy
Political science Prof. Harold Jacobson, who is retiring this year, speaks at the
Jack L. Walker Conference on Political Affairs Friday as Desmond Dinan looks on.
Walker conference
rveturn-stocampus

By Karen Schwartz
Daily StaffReporter
After a four-year hiatus, the JackL.
Walker Conference on Political Affairs
made its comeback to campus on Friday.
Previously an annual event, the con-
ference addressed U.S. and European
integration and the issues surrounding
trade policy, industry structure and
general U.S. and European Union inter-
action.
Desmond Dinan. professor of inter-
national commerce and policy at
George Mason University, gave the
keynote address. He discussed the
effects of the Bush Administration on
the U.S. and E.U. relations.
The event also featured a panel
discussion with Dinan, University
political science professors and a
European Commission advisor from
Washington.
The Undergraduate Political Science
Association picked the conference
topic and is one of its co-hosts.
UPSA president Mark Sherer. an
LSA senior, said his goal for the year
was to bring the event back after its
four-year absence.
Sherer said he was pleased by stu-
dent and faculty turnout and that he fit
it was worth it to bring in new voices
and give people the chance to hear
their perspectives.
"It's a chance for undergraduates

to interact with scholars who'd usu-
ally only be at big scholarly confer-
ences - this is our chance as
students to bring it to an undergrad-
uate level," he said.
He added that students don't always.
have the opportunity to interact with
international relations experts. and that
after reading these scholars' works it's
nice to meet some of the people in the
flesh.
"I think we've accomplished our
goal here today," he said. "We cov-
ered a wide spectrum 'of ages and
education and created an engaging
experience for undergraduates and
faculty members."
LSA junior Jessica Fogel said she
found the conference educational and
interesting because it gave her informa-
tion and ideas from a variety of' stand-
points.
"I really liked that they brought in a
professor from another school." she
said. "I think it's neat to get the differ-
ent perspectives."
The conference was held this year in
honor of Harold Jacobson, a political
science professor retiring at the end of
the year.
"It's good that the undergraduates
have revived the Walker conference."
Jacobson said. "They chose a very good
topic to focus on an issue of concern
that students should be paying attention
to.

WRnT FOR THE
SUMMER DAILY.
CALL 7DALY.
Does
Food,
Weight,
Or Exercise
C!ONTRO0L
Your Life???
STARTING THURS. 4/26
"EATING ISSUES
AND BODY IMAGE
THERAPY GROUP"
5:30 - 6:45 PM
SHERI SZUCH, PHD 741-8584
SUZANNE BATES, PHD 668-0077

Admissions exams ar highly ieveraged tests.
Answering even a few more questions correctly
can improve your ranking by many percentiles.
At EXCEL, we focus upon the key distinctions
that result in great scores. Lin to anticipate
the exam's thinking, manage your time more
efficiently, & develop effective exam strategies.
EXCEL provides clear, systematic instruction,
succinct study notes & accurate admissions advice.
COMPREHENSIVE EXAM PREPARATION
INDIVIDUALZED & AFFORDABLE
E 1CL1117 South University
Test Preparation 996-500

0
IL

I,

M iitia members host
'tax-blast' to unwind

o.
REC
SPORTS
INTRAMURALS

The University of Michigan
Department of Recreational Sports
INTRAMURAL SPORTS PROGRAM

WHAT'S

HAPPENING

BANCROFT (AP) --Dr. Carmen
Steigman resents the S50,000 in taxes
she has to pay this year, so she took plea-
sure in firing a 5-inch bullet into an IRS
tax form this weekend.
"Yes, it was kind of gratifying," said
Steigman, a Farmington Hills patholo-
gist. "It was like, 'Here, Uncle Sam, this
is for you.'
At the "Tax Blast" on a remote farm
in Shiawassee County, Steigman and
about 75 other people paid S2 per bullet
for the experience of firing a .50-caliber
Browning rifle -- the type of weapon
used to stop military tanks --- into tax
forms pinned up as targets.
The Michigan Militia and its Wayne
County brigade sponsored the Saturday
shootout. A .50-caliber gun brought by
Dave Franey of Wyandotte was a
favorite with the earplug wearing crowd.
"I love raw power. It's the same reason
I love V-8 cars. I just enjoy shooting.
After shooting that, it felt like I needed a
cigarette -- and I don't smoke,"
Steigman said.
Since 1995, the Militia and other
groups have used the Tax Blast -- held
in Bancroft about 64 miles northwest of
Detroit _ to recruit members.
Steigman wasn't eager to sign up for
the militia, but said she had a good time.
Worried at first by rifle-toting, camou-
flage-wearing security guards that greet-
ed her as she drove up to the farm, the
Garden City Hospital employee said she

relaxed with the rest of*the group.
"I expected a bunch of crazy people,
but these people were courteous. I didn't
see any alcohol and I didn't even hear
one swear word. This group isn't what I
expected it to be"
Steigman also got to hear about
beliefs and ways of' militia members,
including Albion resident Melvin Harris.
le hasn't paid income or property tax
since 1995.
"No, I don't like taxes," Harris told
The Flint Journal. "I recently got a
notice of levy saying I owe $14,299.91.
But I'll never pay that to a fiction gov-
ernment that doesn't exist. There's no
money. Its all an illusion."
Harris, an ironworker at a Lansing-
area factory, doesn't have a telephone or
driver's license as part of his beliefs that
the U.S. government has too much con-
trol over people's lives.
Genesee County Militia member
Jerry Runkle of Clarkston said he pays
his taxes, but likes to attend events like
the Tax Blast to socialize with other
members and support the right to bear
arms.
"A lot of people link us with hate
groups" Runkle said. "But we're not.
We're more of a group who wants to
keep our rights where they are at. I
would like to see my grandkids grow
up and have the same freedoms and
good times that I had when I was a
kid."

SOFTBALL

0

Spring Term
ENTRIES TAKEN:
Thursday 5/3 ONLY
5:00 PM, IMSB
ENTRY FEE:
$60 per team
MANAGER'S MEETING:
MANDATORY
Thurs 5/3, 5:00 PM, IMSB
PLAY BEGINS:
Sun 5/6
Elbel Fields

SAND
VOLLEYBALL
Spring Term
ENTRIES TAKEN:
Thursday 5/3 ONLY
6:30 PM, IMSB
ENTRY FEE:
$40 per team
MANAGER'S MEETING:
MANDATORY
Thurs 5/3, 6:30 PM, IMSB
PLAY BEGINS:
Tues 5/8, Elbel Courts

t

ROLLER
HOCKEY
Spring Term
ENTRIES TAKEN:
Thursday 5/3 ONLY
7:30 pm, IMSB
ENTRY FEE:
$45 per team
MANAGER'S MTG:
MANDATORY
Thurs 5/3, 7:30 PM
PLAY BEGINS:
Tues 5/8, Elbel Pad

3-on-3
BASKETBALL
Spring Term
ENTRIES TAKEN:
Thursday 5/3 ONLY
7:30 PM, IMSB
ENTRY FEE:
$20 per team
MANAGER'S MEETING:
MANDATORY
Tluirs 5/3, 8:00 PM, IM3
PLAY BEGINS:
Tues 5/8, Elbel Courts

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