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April 09, 2001 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 2001-04-09

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28 - The Michigan Daily - SportsMonday - April 9, 2001

Ae idEuO THWE
ATH LEUTE OF T HE W EEK

Who: Scott Vetere
Hometown: Pennsburg, Penn.

Sport: Gymnastics
Year: Junior

Why: Vetere took home three AlAmerica awards at the men's gymnastics}
NCAA Championships in Columbus this weekend. He finished runner-up on
the still rings with a 9.847, and finished among the top six on the parallel
bars and the horizontal bar. Veterebegan his impressive weekend by finish-
ing fourth in Friday's all-around competition. With hIs performance this
weekend, Vetere is now an eight-time All-American.

Tuesday, April 10
Baseball vs. Eastern Michigan, 3 p.m.
Wednesday, April 11
Softball vs. Central Michigan (DH), 2 p.m.
Baseball at Western Michigan, 3 p.m.
M Tennis at Michian State, 6 p.m.
Friday, April 13
Softball at Minnesota (DH), 2 p.m.
Baseball at Minnesota, 3 p.m.
Saturday, April 14
Football in Spring Game, 1 p.m.
Baseball at Minnesota (DH), 1 p.m.
Softball at Wisconsin, 2 p.m.
M Golf at Kepler Invitational (Columbus, Ohio)
W Golf at Iowa Howkeye Invitational
Rowing at Ohio State
M Track and Field hosts Michigan State, Central Michigan
W Track and Field hosts Michigan State, Central Michigan

THE FORUM
Your chance to speak out on
issues in Michigan sports
Was this hockey season the last for Andy
Hilbert and Jeff Jillson?
N How much will the "Talk with Tommy"
help raise spirits for men's basketball?
® Will the softball and baseball teams be able
to extend their respective win streaks?
Daily Sports wants feedback! Visit
www.michigandaily/forum for your chance to
be heard.
CL UB 3P9P WEEKLY

Baseball
Through April 8
PlIyer G
Esper 4
blffio 15
Koman 28
Cantalames 25
Wright 22
Tousa 28
Ghannam 19
Jominy 15
Sokol 25
LaRosa 24
Fox 22
Roberts 23
Coleman 8
Wuerfel 9
Rutkowski 22
French 11
Trzos 9

Softball
Through April 8

BA
.667
.447
.385
.360
.355
.302
.275
.258
.243
.224
.221
.215
.200
.167
.158
.154
.136

AB
3
47
104
89
76
96
51
31
74
67
68
65
20
18
38
26
22

RBI
3
11
29
14
19
10
21
1
8
4
8
7
1
1
2
3
1

HR
1
3
5
1
5
1
6
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0

Player
Taylor
Kollen
Moulden
Tune
Volpe
Doe
Bugel
Young
Schock
Mack
Churchill
Garza
Betley
Elsner
Conner
Murdock
Prichard

G BA
31 .480
33 .360
33 .310
33 .296
31 .275
29 .273
20 .273
30 .253
29 .229
21 .200
17 .176
24 .174
16 .156
6 .100
18 .000
5 .000
4 .000

AB
100
111
100
98
80
77
33
79
70
5
17
46
32
10
8
2
0

RBI
6
16
23
10
21
4
2
9
10
0
4
4
3
3
0
0
0

HR
0
0
4
1
2
0
0
2
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0

NOTES
April Phillips breaks record in hammer throw

- ditddb)ip thAlmner an Ni v ikra
Money main concern
for ultimate frisbee

The Duke Invitational this past
weekend in Durham, N. C. brought
some record-breaking results. The
Michigan women's track team was
on site at Wallace Wade Stadium to
see how it measured up against
South Carolina - the defending
NCAA champions - and 77 other
teams.
"Overall, it was a good meet with
the exception of three or four ath-
letes who had outstanding perfor-
mances," Michigan coach James
Henry said.
In field events, sophomore April
Phillips broke the school record in
the hammer throw with 182 feet,

six inches. Trying to make a quali-
fying mark in the discus, freshman
Melissa Bicket's throw was only
six inches away from NCAA quali-
fication.
Taking a huge victory in distance
events was senior Katie Jazwinski.
Competing in the 1500-meter run,
she provisionally qualified for
NCAAs with a time of 4:20:22.
Senior Lisa Ouellet also ran in the
same event and ran her second-
fastest career time.
"For me, to be at this point so
early into outdoor season is pretty
good," Ouellet, said.
- Rhonda Gilner

By Mike Hensch
lDaily Sports Writer

where the game is more popular.
With distances too far to cover by
bus or van, the team is forced to fly

ERA leader (Sinnings pitched)
Leveque 0.34
Strikeout leader
Hill 43

ERA leader (5 innings pitched)
Young 1.20
Strikeout leader
Young 111

DAILY SCOREBOARD

NBA STANDINGS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 53 23 .697 -
'Miamit 45 30 .600 7
New York 45 30 .600 7
vorlando 41 35 .539 12
Boston 35 42 .455 18
New Jersey 26 51 .338 27
Washington 18 58 .237 35
central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 48 28 .632 -
Toronto 43 33 .566 5
Charlotte 42 35 .545 6
Indiana 35 40 .467 12
3Detroit 29 47 .382 19
Cleveland 26 50 .342 22
Atlanta 23 53 .303 25
chicago 12 63 .160 35
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
W L Pct GB
San-Antonio 54 22 .711 -
Utah 5o 26 .658 4
Dallas 49 27 .645 5
Minesota 45 30 .600 8
Houston 42 35 .545 12
Denver 37 40 .481 17
~Vancouver 22 55 .286 32
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
" Sacramento 51 24 .680 -
£LA akers 51 26 .662 1
-Portland 48 28 .632 3
Phoenix 47 29 .618 4
Seattle 41 36 .532 11
LA Clippers 28 49 .364 24
Golden State 17 58 .227 34
GRAND SLAM
Continued from Page 1
call-this remarkable feat. Purists argue
that a Grand Slam is accomplished in a
calendar year. Woods, emotionally
drained after a relentless battle from
start to finish, stayed out of the argu-
ment.
"I won four," he said with a coy
smile.
Locked in a thrilling battle with his
- two chief rivals, Woods hit a daring
approach from 149 yards into the per-
ilous 1 Ith hole. The ball grazed the cup
for a tap-in birdie, giving Woods a lead
that he never let go.
Duval, believing this might be his
year after three close calls, made it
through Amen Corner without a mis-
take but took bogey on the par-3 16th,
firing his tee shot over the green and
missing an 8-foot putt for par.

SPORTsBRIEFS

NHL STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division

New Jersey
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
NY Rangers
NY Islanders
Northeast Division
Ottawa
Buffalo
Toronto
Boston
Montreal

W
48
42
41
33
21
W
48
46
37
36
28

L T RTPts GF GA
19 12 3 111 295 195
25 113 98238206
289 3 94 275 252
435 1 72 2F~0290
517 3 52 135 268
L T RT Pts GF GA
2219 4 109 274 205
29 5 1 98 217 182
29115 90 232 207
308 8 88 227>249
408 6 70 206 232
L T RT Pts GF GA
27 104 94 231 210
319 3 88 208 219
38 13 9 66 200 246
452122 60 211 289
466 5 59 200 278

Southeast Division
W
Washington 40
Carolina 38
Florida 22
Atlanta 23
Tampa Bay 24
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division

Detroit
St. Louis
Nashville
Chicago
Columbus
Northwest Division
Colorado
Edmonton
Vancouver
Calgary
Minnesota
Pacific Division
Dallas
San Jose
Los Angeles
Phoenix
Anahiem

w
49
43
34
29
27
w
51
39
36
27
25
w
48
39
38
35
25

L T RTF
20 9 4
22 12 5
36 9 3
408 4
399 6
L T RT
16104
2812 3
283117
36 154
38 135
C T RT
248 2
27 123
28 13 3
27 173
4011 5

Pts GF GA
111 253 202
103 249 195
80 186 200
70 207 242
69 186 230
Pts GF GA
116 266 190
93 243 222
90 239 238
73 197 236
68 166 206

Pts
106
93
92
90
66

Gf GA
241 187
213 191
252 228
214 212
187 241

Bulls' Crawford might
get chance to return
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) - Jamal
Crawford is a rookie with the Chicago
Bulls and making a lot of money.
But Crawford still wishes he was
playing basketball at Michigan.
"I miss college a lot," he said. "I live
in a college area now because I like to
be around college kids."
Crawford felt trapped last year when
he decided to leave Michigan following
his freshman season.
He already had served an eight-game
suspension for one mistake - sending
the NBA a letter that said he intended to
enter the 1999 draft before he enrolled
in college. He had missed six other
games and was ordered to repay
$15,000 in benefits to a Seattle busi-
nessman, whom he had lived with for
three years during high school.
The NCAA later said he could give
S11,300 to the charity of his choice. If
he didn't pay, Crawford would lose his
eligibility.
Today, the NCAA Management
Council will consider a proposal that
would give players, like Crawford, an
opportunity to continue their college
careers without penalty.
"It's new territory," Charles Harris,
chairman of the Management Council,
said. "I think it is something we'd like
to fix. It's not whether kids should get
paid, but whether the rules should be
more flexible and more responsive and
that's always the desire."
The changes would be sweeping and
controversial.
If approved, high-school athletes
could accept prize money, sign con-
tracts, compete with professionals and
earn money following graduation, even
enter the draft - and keep their eligibil-
ity.
It also would allow college athletes to
obtain bank loans based on future earn-
ings.

He had two chances to catch Woods,
but looked on in shock as birdie putts
from 12 feet on the 17th and 5 feet on
the final hole failed to fall.
Mickelson, poised to claim his first
major, also missed an 8-foot par putt on
the 16th hole. He also failed to cash in
on birdie putts on the final two holes.
Woods never faltered.
His lead remained at one stroke when
he missed a 3-foot birdie putt on the
15th, but he traded spectacular golf for
solid play with history on the line and
delivered, as he has done from the time
he turned pro five short years ago.
"I've succeeded in what I wanted to
accomplish," Woods said as he sat in
Butler's cabin waiting for last year's
winner, Vijay Singh, to help him put on
another green jacket.
"I don't feel ecstatic yet. It hasn't
sunk in."He later took a congratulatory
call from President Bush.

Harris said today's environment has
forced the NCAA into this position.
"The absoluteness has changed," he
said. "So we need, to the extent we can,
not to be punitive against people who
are doing the normal things in their
life."
Crawford's case is one example.
After discovering the letter, the
NCAA first ruled Crawford forfeited his
college eligibility, even though he wrote
a second letter six days later withdraw-
ing his name. Current NCAA rules
allow college athletes a one-time excep-
tion for players who put their name on
the NBA draft list to retain their eligibil-
ity if they aren't drafted. That does not
apply to high-school players - yet.
Michigan appealed, and the NCAA
reduced Crawford's penalty to an eight-
game suspension.
But even if the changes are approved,
they wouldn't take effect immediately.
Arizona's Jefferson
to enter NBA draft
TUCSON (AP) - Forward Richard
Jefferson, a key to Arizona's drive to
the national championship game,
decided to skip his senior season and
enter the NBA draft.
Jefferson averaged 11.3 points, 5.4
rebounds and 2.7 assists in 35 games
as the Wildcats reached the NCAA
final before losing 82-72 to Duke.
He shot 47.9 percent from the floor
and 34.4 percent from three-point
range.
Martinez K's 16 in_
win over Devil Rays
BOSTON (AP) - The Tampa Bay
Devil Rays couldn't do anything to
Pedro Martinez, and neither could the
weather.
Fighting 42-degree temperatures and
intermittent rain, Martinez struck out 16
in eight innings to lead the Boston Red
Sox to a 3-0 victory over Tampa Bay
for his first win of the season.
"You just have to understand what's
happening to your body," said Martinez
(1-0), who his first six outs on strikeouts
and brought a no-hitter into the sixth.
"It's different. But the cold weather is
affecting the hitters, too."

Ultimate Frisbee is not a normal to tournaments.
sport. Unlike conventional sports, "In the Midwest, there's not that
there are no referees; rather the play- many good teams so we have to
ers are responsible for making their travel a lot," co-captain Tim Murray
own calls, much like pick up basket- said. "This season, we've traveled to
ball. Stanford, North Carolina and this*
"We have a code between each weekend we went to Madison to
other that is, I'm not going to try to play in a tournament."
cheat you and you aren't going to try With much of the money coming
to cheat me' becausq we don't have from MagnUM team member' pock-
referees," said coach Ricky Eikstadt. ets, the team attempts to save as
Ultimate Frisbee teams are unique much money on the road.
in that their nicknames tend not to "Our shortest amount of time
be the mascot of their respective uni- spent in a hotel before being kicked
versity. The men's club team, known out was about seven minutes," team
as MagnUM beat out TUMULT co-captain Mike Haley said. "In
(The University of Michigan Ulti- order to save money on hotel rooms,
mate Team) in 1997 in which sup- we got three rooms and told the
porters of both names played a game front desk that eight people would
against each other to decide the team be staying there, but we really had
name. 28."
MagnUM is unique in the world Insufficient funds also leaves
of ultimate as well. Angus "Gus" MagnUM at a disadvantage when
Mairs is the oldest player in college playing in tournaments.
ultimate and according to the team, "We don't travel all the time with
was discovered in an archaeological our whole team, which is obviously
dig. a hindrance when playing the best
The governing body is the Ulti- teams in the nation," Murray said.
mate Players Association, which MagnUM will travel to Madison
grants five years of eligibility start- this weekend to tune up for the
ing with your first UPA sanctioned regional and national tournaments
event. "Gus", who is 37 years old, where they have finished in ninth
did not play as an undergrad and is place at{nationals for the last two
presently in the school of education years.
as a graduate student. This year, nationals will be held at
As a club sport, the team is given the end of May in Boston. Although
a mere $2,500.00 a year to cover the cost of traveling will put a dent
expenses. Yet, for MagnUM to play into each player's wallet, the shot at
against the best in the nation, it is a national title keeps MagnUM pay-@
drawn to the east and west coasts, ing to play.
Tennis club alms to
ha ve fun in te 5sun

By Elizabeth Edelstein
For the Daily
The theme of this year's Tennis Club
is to combine the best of competition
and fun. Started by seniors Sharon
Reske and Ryan Wisweeser, this is only
the second year for the team. Until
now, the only option had been a non-
competitive club team or the varsity
level.
Things have changed.
The club team now practices twice a
week and competes against other
schools. Their practices are held year
round, Monday and Thursday from
nine to 11 p.m. Players have to pay to
use court-space at the Varsity Tennis
Center. Practices are about five dollars
a night. On top of that, home games
cost from 15-20 dollars each, and away
games are around 60-100 dollars each.
So far the team has played against
Harvard, Michigan State, Ferris State
and Miami of Ohio. One more game is

scheduled for this season against Miami
(Ohio), which is away on April 7.
While the team is becoming more
competitive, the goal is also to have fun
and accommodate academic needs.
Reske said that the team has a "social
focus" and gives people the opportunity
to play tennis and meet people at the
same time.
"People are out there tq have a good
time," Reske said.
The team consists of 60 people -45
of these are active members of the*
team. Among the players, senior Anne
Williams is the top female and the top
male is sophomore Nnamudi Amobi.
If it had not been for Reskes initia-
tive, these people never wouldn't have
had this opportunity to play tennis and
make friends because the club would
have never started. A lot of organization
was needed to get it going, and mem-
bers of the club hope to continue on and
only get better as the years go on.
- Jim Weber contributed to this article

Eta Kappa Nu Association
The Eta Kappa Nu Association is the International Honor Society for Electrical and Computer Engineers. Outstanding
persons elect to Eta. Kappa Nu primarily during their junior or senior year, but also from graduate school. Eligibility
depends on marked ability as demonstrated by academic excellence, personal character, community service, and distin-
guished accomplishments, all of which indicate that the candidate is or will be a success in his or her profession. Members
of Eta Kappa Nu are marked people, sought after by the best companies and schools.
We, the officers and faculty advisors of the Beta Epsilon chapter of Eta Kappa Nu at the University of Michigan, heartily
congratulate the following students for meeting the membership requirements and completing the initiation process for
the following terms, thus becoming active members of Eta Kappa Nu:
Winter 2001

Tau Beta Pi*

MICHIGAN GAMMA
TAU LBEA i\1I, Timi NATIONAI ENGINEERING HONOR SOCIETY, WAS FOUNDED TO MARK IN A FITTING MANNER
THOSE WHO HAvE CONFERRDI) HONOR UPON THEIR ALMA MATER BY DISTINGUISHED SCHOLARSHIP AND
EXEMPLARY CHARACTER AS STUDENTS IN ENGINEERING, OR BY THEIR ATTAINMENTS AS ALUMNI IN THE FIELD OF
ENGINEERING, AND TO FOSTER A SPIRIT OF LIBERAL CULTURE IN ENGINEERING COILEGES.
WE, THE OFFICERS AND FACUlXY ADVISORS OF THE MICHIGAN GAMMA CHAPTER of TAU BETA Pi, wish 'TO
CONGRATULATE LTHI FOLLOWING PEOPIE WHO HAVE ACHIEVED OUR HIGH STANDARDS AND HAVE SUCCESSFULLY
COMPLIETHED TIE INITIATION RITUALS, THEREBY BECOMING ACTIVE MEMBERS OF FAU BETA PI:

Karl Brakora
Emily Burmeister
David Cheng
Jason Cheng
Philip Cherdron
Alina Chu
Jeffrey Gregory
Seong Hye Hwang
Kamran Kashef
Andrew Knofski

Ka-Yee Lee
Leung Kway Lee
Kwok Leung
Jingying Li
John Lim
Benjamin Low
Mark Matteucci
James Newsome
David Papa
Aditya Prasad

Eric Sam
Niraj Shah
Marcel Shell
Travis Smith
Anthony Stark
Jack Stepanian
Daniel Tam
Jeanne Whalen
Peter Wierzbinski
Chi Wong

0

GAIL AGACINSKI
ANDREANA ANDREANA
H IN MENG; AU
IASO BACKI >

JOE DIMAMBRO
NILOTHIPAUL D UTTA
CHERRY EFFENDI
HENRY FAN

MEGAN LEHMAN
FENG-LI LIAN
JOHANNA LICHTMAN
YIIING LIm

NEIL SHAH
NIRAJ SHAH
JUSTIN SHETNEY
ERIC SIIONS

i

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