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April 02, 2001 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2001-04-02

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2B - The Michigan Daily - SportsMonday - Monday, April 2, 2001

ATHLETE OF THE
Who: Melissa Karjala Sport: Water Polo
Hometown: Ann Arbor Year. Senior
Aft Karjala set a school record for Michigan's water polo team by scorng
six goals in a single game against Massachusetts on Saturday. The team
sqored four other goals to net the 108 win. With eight goals in the three
game toumnament, Karjala was named Offensive Player of the Invitational
$Hstory: Karjala is a senior tri-captain for the Wolverines in their inaugural
season of varsity competition. She has netted 28 goals thus far in the sea-
son.

; WEEK

CLUBSPORTSWEEKLY

TIE FORUM

- Edited by Seth Klempner and Naweed Sikora
Officiating, penalties
leave 1cers devastated

Your chance to speak out on
issues in Michigan spowts
e How will the Michigan hoclky team fare
in the Frozen Four?
What have you thought about the Final Four
so far?
Are Michigan's spring sports going to be
any good this season?
Daily Sports wants feeaback! Visit
www.m rx l /Yomm for your chance to

By Mike Hensch
Daily Sports Writer

M9 NOTES

Women's track.
runs into Stanford
This weekend, the Michigan
women's tennis team made the trip
to'Palo Alto for the 2001 Stanford
Track and Field Invitational. It was
a big meet including teams from all
over the nation including several
Big'Ten teams.
The Invitational was Michigan's
second outdoor meet of the season.
Both of which have been non-scor-
ing events.
Over the weekend the Wolverines
had several top ten finishes in the
Invitational that included over 35
events and three first place finishes.
.Mx TAT

Two of those firs
came in the 400-met
Carly Knazz and S
placed top in their p
Knazz ran a 54.64
beat out Maggie Ves
SLO by .2 of a seco
noon race. Rankin fi
seconds in the morni
Katie Jazwinski a
in the 800 meter run
ond place finisher b
onds.
The 4x100 relay
second with a time<
to the San Fransisco
ond. Michigan's ot
finished third.

rala The women's club hockey team ended
its season this past weekend with memo-
ries of numerous successes overshadow-
ing stories of controversies. The team
t place finishes fell to Pittsburgh, 3-2 in the final game.
er dashes where Earlier in the year, the team ended a
harlina Rankin game with Arizona State in a bench
erspective races. clearing brawl. The national tournament
second dash to was marred by bad officiating as well as
ssi of Cal. Poly- a scandal, in which Wisconsin used an
nd in the after- illegal goalie.
nished in 57.56 After going undefeated in league play
ng race. during the season, the sky was the limit
lso placed first for the women's club hockey team as it
beating the sec- entered the CCWHA Championship
y over two sec- and the national tournament.
The team, which lost an early round
team finished game in the league tournament to
of 46.64, losing Western Michigan, had to beat the
by .04 of a sec- Broncos twice in the finals to claim its
her relay team second-consecutive championship due
to the double elimination format.
- Staff reports "After going through the regular sea-
son undefeated, my team had all the
confidence in the world," first-year
coach Hal Krenkel said. "No one on the
team had any doubts that we would beat
Western twice in the finals."
A Pts Sh , The inaugural national tournament
39 65 207 was plagued with problems. The team
32 60 159 was frustrated with the seeding of the
24 3 8 tournament as well as the officiating.
17 31 88
19 29 98 The Wolverines were the top-ranked
11 27 147 team in the East all season, but received
18 27 114 a No. 2 seed in their bracket.
16 26 65 The three-game round robin portion
14 22 104 of the tournament decided which game
7 21 769 each team would play in the final round
12 16 81 in the tournament, consisting of first,
9 12 42 third, fifth, and seventh place games.
8 10 55 Michigan was left with a bitter taste
5 9 28 in its mouth after settling for a fifth
8 9 35
4 5 PLAY4BA2LL51
4 4 37
2 3 11

place finish. In a controversial game,
the Wolverines lost to Pittsburgh in the
round robin, after two Michigan goals
were called off by the referees.
"The two goals called back were two
blatantly bad calls," Krenkel said."The
Pittsburgh head coach apologized after
the game because he knew that we were
robbed out of a win."
Another game with Colorado ended
in a tie, yet the game was ultimately
decided by penalty minutes. With more
penalty minutes, the Wolverines were,
in a sense, given a loss because the tie
hindered their chance at placing higher.
"Deciding a game by penalty minutes
is a poor way to decide a game," senior
forward Jodi Berris said. "We should
have played a five minute overtime and
than gone into a shootout."
With the decision based on penalty
minutes as well as the goals that were
called off, the Wolverines played the
Badgers in the fifth place game. But,
Wisconsin was forced to forfeit the
game, due to the use of a varsity goalie.
Krenkel summed up the tournament
for Michigan: "Although we were not
deemed national champions, we are
confident that we could beat any team
in the tournament."
With the season coming to an end,
the team must deal with the loss of the
seniors. Although key players have
ended their careers this past weekend,
the Wolverines expect to reload their
roster with in-state talent.
Though the national tournament
ended with undesirable results,
Michigan beat the two top teams, St.
Cloud and Wisconsin. The season was
capped by a 30-3-2 record second-con-
secutive league title as well as numerous
stories that will be remembered for years
to come.

be heard.

PoR TsBR IEFS

TOM FELOKAMP/Daily

Baseball
Through April 1.
Player G
tEsper 3
LOIft 15
-Ccntalamessa 19
oman 22
Tousa 22
Wright 16
Jominy 10
LaRosa 20
Roberts 18
Gfannam 13
Wuerful 7
Sokol 19
Rutkowski 17
Fox 17
Trzos 9

Hockey
Through March 25

BA
.500
.447
.373
.357
.308
.278
.278
.226
.204
.200
.200
.197
.143
.137
.136

AB
2
47
67
84
78
54
18
62
54
30
15
61
35
51
22

RBI
0
11
11
21
8
9
0
4
6
2
1
5
2
3
1

HR
0
3
1
3
1
4
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0

Player
Hilbert
Cammalleri
Shouneyia
Kosic k
Jillson
Langfeld
Matzka
Koch
Mink
Ort meyer
Murray
Komisarek
Trainor
Roemensky
Kautz
Vancik
Blackburn
Huntzic ker
Burnes
Wyzgowski
Swistak

GP
41
41
44
40
42
41
44
39
44
27
41
40
42
44
34
38
44
28
40
14
30

G
26
28
9
14
10
16
9
10
8
10
10
4
3
2
4
1
0
0
0
1.
0

Tourney riots may
lead to expulsions
STATE COLLEGE (AP} - Penn
State students involved in a melee
when the school's team vks elimi-
nated from the NCAA touirnament
might be expelled, school officials
said.
The university plans to send "a
stronger message" by inposing
stiffer punishment than in the past,
said Joe Puzycki, the unTversity's
director of judicial affairs.
About 4,000 people swarmed into
the street, hurled firecrackers, cans
and bottles, and tried to tear down
lampposts March 23 after Penn
State's 84-72 loss to Teilple in the
tournament's round of 1
Police arrested 20 peole - most
of them students - a*1 say more
arrests are likely as irovestigators
review videotapes and pihotographs.
The melee caused about $8,000 in
damage.
Street violence brote out in the
same area during the Central
Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts in
1998 and 2000. The crowds were
smaller, but property damage from
the first disturbance vas estimated at
$120,000.
Raiders could be
back in LA, soon
LOS ANGELES (0.P) - The bil-
lion-dollar legal battle to determine
the rights to the Los Angeles pro foot-
ball market raises an intriguing ques-
tion:
If the Oakland Raiders win their
lawsuit against the ILL, will they try
to return to Los Angees?
It's a question Ptaiders owner Al
Davis has so far declined to answer as
he has watched the trial in a cramped

Los Angeles courtroom the past three
weeks.
After a weekend break, the trial is
to resume Monday.
As part of a separate lawsuit againsW
the city of Oakland, Davis had asked a
judge to let him out of a lease requir-
ing the Raiders to play at the Oakland
Coliseum for 10 more years. That
request was denied.
NFL owners hope he'll come up
with the same result in Los Angeles.
Selig loving new
Milwaukee stadiun#
MILWAUKEE (AP) - When base-
ball commissioner Bud Selig entered
Miller Park to a packed house for the
first time, he was so moved that he did-
n't say a word for several minutes.
Selig finally turned to his wife, Sue,
and said simply:"Oh, my God!"
Selig attended President Bush's base-
ball celebration at the White House on
Friday, then jetted back to see the
Milwaukee Brewers open Miller Park
with a 5-4 exhibition win over the
Chicago White Sox.
"The president loves baseball, he's a
real fan, it was an extraordinary day,"
Selig said
And the night was even better for
Selig, who worked tirelessly to get a
retractable-roofed replacement for
County Stadium as owner of th@
Brewers before becoming fulltime con
missioner in 1998.
Selig spent the evening in a private
suite with White Sox owner Jerry
Reinsdorf and Hank Aaron, among oth-
ers. He was so deluged by thankful fans
as he walked around the stadium that he
never reached the press box for his cus-
tomary visit with reporters.
President Bush will see it for himself
on Friday night, when he throws out th
first pitch before the Brewers officiall
open Miller Park.

ERA leader (5 innings pitched)
Leveque 0.00
Srtfikeout leader
Korecky 25
Save leader
Trzos 2

M' S HDULEL
Tuesday, Api 3
Baseball vs. Bowling Green, 3 p.m.
Softball vs. Oakland (DH), 3 p.m.
Wednesday, April 4
Baseball at Eastem Michigan, 3 p.m.
Softball at Bowling Green, 3 p.m.
fhurda, Api 5
M Gymnastics at NCAA Championships Qualifier (Columbus), 7 p.m.
lee Hockey vs. Boston College at NCAA Frozen Four (Albany, N.Y.), 7:30 p.m.
Friday, Apdi 6
Softball vs. Purdue (DH), 2 p.m.
Baseball vs. Indiana, 3 p.m.
M Gymnastics at NCAA Championships Team Finals (Columbus) 7 p.m.
-M-Golf at Marshall Invitational
M Track/Field at Duke Invitational
«.Sd Wrday, Api 7
r W Tennis at Ohio State, 10 a.m.
I*i Tennis vs. Penn State, Noon
Baseball vs. Indiana (DH), 1 p.m.
Softball vs. Indiana, 2 p.m.
W Gymnastics hosts NCAA Northeast Region Championships, 6 p.m.
A.ce Hockey at NCAA Frozen Four Final (Albany, N.Y.), 7 p.m.
M 'Gymnastics at NCAA Championships Individual Finals (Columbus), 7 p.m.
M Golf at Marshall Invitational
W Golf at Indiana Invitational
Rowing at Michigan State
M Track/Field at Duke Invitational
Water Polo at Southern Division Championships (Grove City, Pa.)

DAILY C RL BOARD

NBA STANDINES
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GS~
Philadelphia 51,22 .699 -
Miami 43 29 .597 7.5
New York 4230 .583 8.5
Orlando 39 33 .542 11.5
Bosin 33 40 .452 18
New Jersey 25 50 .333 27
Washington 18 55 .247 33
Central Division
WL Pct GS
Milwaukee 46 26 .639 -
Charlotte 4; 32 .562 5.5
Toronto 40 32 .556 6
Indiana 313 40 .452 13.5
Detroit : 46 .361 20
Cleveland *a 47 .356 20.5
Atlanta 23 51 .311 24
Chicago 12 60 .167 34
WESTERN CONFERENW
Midwest Division
VV LPctGB
San Antonio 51 22 .699 -
Utah 49 24 .671 2
Dallas 46 26 .639 4.5
Minnesota 43 30 .589 8
Houston 40 33 .548 11
Denver 35 39 3473 16.5
Vancouver 21 53 .284 30.5
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
Sacramento 49 22 .690 -
LA Lakers 48 25 .658 2
Portland 47 26 .644 3
Phoenix 44 29 .620 5
Seattle 41 34 .549 10
LA Clippers 27 47 .365 23.5
Golden State 1.7 55 .236 32.5

NHL STANDINGS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division

New Jersey
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
NY Rangers
NY Islanders
Northeast Division
Ottawa
¢uffalo
Toronto
Bostorn
Montreal
Southeast Division

W
44
41
40
32
20
w
46
44
35
33
27
W;

ST RT Pts GF GA
19123 103 278 186
21 112 95 231 198' i
279 2 91 267 242
415 1 70 245 281
48 7 3 50 174 255
L T RT Pts GF GA
20 9 4 105 263 194
285 1 94 208 175
28 11 5 86 224 200
298 8 82 215 238
398 5 67 201 225
L T RI Pts GF GA
25103 91222200
318 3 83 200214
36 13 S 62 192 237
456 4 38 195 270
43 12 2 58 204 280

Washington
Carolina 3
Florida 20
Tampa Bay 2
Atlanta 2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division

9
6
0
4
2

AP PHOTO
The Texas Rangers and the Toronto Blue Jays listen to the national anthem yester-
day as the baseball season officially began In San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Detroit
St. Louis
Nashville
Chicago
Columbus
Northwest Division
Colorado
Edmonton
Vancouver
Calgary
Minnesota
Pa-cifi Division
Dallas
San Jose
Phoenix
Los Angeles
Anaheim

46
41
33
29
25
W
50
38
35
26
24
46
37
34
;36
24

f RT Pts Gf GA
19 9 4 105 242 196
21 11 5 98 241 190
349 3 78 181 194
378 4 70 202 232
37 9 6 65 179 221

L

L T RT
159 4
27 113
24 117
34 14 4
37 125

Pts GF GA
113 257 182
90 234 213
88 232 227
70 186 223
65 159 198

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L T RT Pts GF GA
24 7 2 101 227 178
27 122 88 202 1849
26 163 87 207 205
28 12 2 86 242 220
39 10 5 631822 3a

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