100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 29, 2001 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2001-03-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

2Ai - fhe Michigan Daily -- i hursdav, March 29, 2001

N AT ION! WORLD

Israel retalates against bombin

GIAZA CITY, Gaza Strip (AP) _ -
Israeli helicopters rocketed head-
quarters of Force 17, Yasser Arafat's
elite guard, in Gaza and the West
Bank town of Ramallah yesterday,
retaliating for a wave of bombings,
including a suicide attack that killed
two Israeli teen-agers.
Reed flares lit up the night sky
over Ramallah, where two people

were killed in the assault, and
flames leaped from burning build-
ings and cars as firefighters tried to
put out tnultiple blazes.
Doctors in Ramallah said the dead
included a member of Force 17 and a
female civilian. Overall, more than two
dozen Palestinians were injured in
Ramallah and Gaza, several critically,
doctors said.

The attacks on Palestinian gov-
ernment buildings were the first
since last fall and further eroded the
fabric and foundation of the peace
agreements that granted the Pales-
tinians autonomy and self-govern-
ment.
Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon
has repeatedly accused Force 17 of
involvement in attacks against Israeli

civilians.
"The purpose is to strik(
those responsible for terr
Israeli military said in a sta
military said it hit the Fors
quarters in Ramallah, and
17 targets around Gaza Ci
al-Balah in the southern G<
including a training camp
depot.

- * dults with Develo
June11 Augua,
I. Counselors
~~ Outdoor Euc
-: Barn & Organic c
:. :..qu stia Instri
* ~,Creative Art,-
:4. Sports
".. Thrdy 'ueBa Outdoor LIvi
$1DsticBersan Make a difference in so
- $ Wl Dins9-0'n Barrier free recreatici
5'ngIslCalltil517-673-21
9 -mil director~thefowlE
Satud*V,. lub Musc °Write: 2315 HarmonL
$Mayville, MI 487,
" The Fowler Cen. atr'17 SIw l Dik 1
9 9 0 6 - P 6OutdoorLer

* Unlimited Nights, Unlimited Weekends. Talk for hours
without burning minutes.
*! Plus, Nationwide Long Distance. At no extra cost, 24/7.

g.s NEWS IN BRIEF Ita
ce directly at WSIGO
rorim," the m e (~ ir p .1 s t
atemet.ThSupremeCor has aijaa ut%
rce 17 head- The Supreme Court took a first look at prescription pot yesterday, heaing argu--
d four Force ments on an issue that has pitted the federal government against cancer, AIDS an .,
ity and Deir other patients who sometimes regard marijuana as a wonder drug.
aza Strip- As far as the federal government is concerned, marijuana is illegal and should-.,,-
and an arms remain so. Federal enforcement efforts have led to confrontations and arrests inE
California and other Western states.
The issue for an openly skeptical Supreme Court is whether a patient's need for
marijuana trumps a 1970 federal law that classifies it as an illegal substance with ..
no known medical value.;,,,,;
President Bush supports federal prohibitions on marijuana, but also respecs _.1
hildren and states' rights to pass voter initiatives, as was the case in California, spokesman A, A,
ilidrn and Fleischer said.
pmentai"The president is opposed to the legalization of marijuana, including for medi,-®
cinal purposes," he said Yesterday.4
St 17 Lawyers for the Oakland Cannabis Buyers' Cooperative in California want to.; M
make what they call a "medical necessity" defense in federal court, and argue that. ,
.fQx federal judges and juries have the power to decide if the drug is warranted.ep
$ Several justices seemed to think that approach was a stretch at best.
Iton WASHINGTON
3arden
'utor Senate votes to raise 'limits on hard money,--
The Senate voted overwhelmingly yesterday to raise the limits on contributions t,
candidates and political parties, hoping to strike a balance on campaign finance legi ,
nig lation one day after moving to flush millions of dollars out of the nation's politi,7
system.
!050 allies to curtail the influence of big money in politics.K
"Money is not evil in and of itself," said Sen. Fred Thompson (R-Tenn.) shortly
rcenter.org before the Senate agreed to increase donation limits enacted in the wake of the Water-,
ake Rd
144 gate scandal a quarter-century ago.
Donors would be permitted to give $2,000 a year each to candidates of their
iter for choice, and $37,500 overall to candidates and political parties for use in direct cam-,
ing" paign expenses. These limits would rise with inflation in the future. The current limiyts;.{
are $1,000 and $25,000. -
-The compromise called for smaller increases than Thompson originally wantP_,
but more than Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) proposed in an alternative.
WASHINGTON ness, the self-styled Ral, who says
Bushorde ban aid cloning is a mandate conveyed to him -4
Bush oder ba s aid an extraterrestrial he met in 1973, sever- u
to family planning al leading House members said t1i* ;
intended to pass a law this year to bar,
Without fanfare or public notice, cloning as a means of reproduction.
President Bush yesterday signed a spe- President Bush has said he also suppr
cial memorandum barring U.S. foreign a ban on cloning and will work
aid to family planning groups involved Congress to pass one.
in abortion. Ral, a French former journalist born.
"It's been done. It will be in the Fed- as Claude Vorilhon, claims he has fund,,
era Register tomorrow White-.House ing and a list of 100 women who will.
spokesman Scott McClellan said. help him clone a human.
The action, which the White House
foreshadowed late last Friday, was . ATLANTA
designed to quietly pre-empt abortion- .
rights proponents in Congress who Children beaten in1
hoped to overturn Bush's policy of deny- ch rh s sin
ing U.S. aid to family planning groups c u c e so s¢
that also do abortion counseling and lob- A judge put 41 children in foster
bying with their own private funds. care for a year yesterday after their par-,,
"President Bush has responded by tak- ents refused to stop whipping them i ,
ing procedural steps aimed at stopping church-sponsored beating sessions and.
Congress from even voting on this issue' forcing teen-age girls to marry.
said Amy Coen, president of Population "I hate to see these children jeopar ,,,
Action International. "It is patently unde- dized by what I consider to be a cult,".,,
mocratic ... and calls into question his Juvenile Court Judge Sanford Jones said.
stated desire to work with Congress"' The decision followed a two-day-
hearing into practices at the House .,
WASHINGTON Prayer, led by the Rev. Arthur Allen Jr ,
The judge was told about a 7-yea -old
Congress hears from left with welts and bruises and a 1-ear-
cloning advocate old with open wounds on his belly ,aj~(, ,
side. A former church member also tes-,f.
A star-shaped pendant around his fled that she was forced to marry at L5
neck, his hair gathered atop his head in a and was beaten when she refused to have
bun, the white-suited leader of a Canadi- sex with her 23-year-old husband.,.t{{
an religious group told lawmakers yes- Allen has said the beatings aresm-
terday that they should no more block pl discipline.

Is plans to clone, human beings than "The Bible says that if you spareth-1
they would stop the development of rod you're going to spoil the child,"
antibiotics, blood transfusions, vaccines said last week..4
and other medical advances. c.
But shortly after hearing from the wit- - Compiled from Daily wire reports.
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745.967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter terms by °
students at the University of Michigan. Subscriptions for fall term, starting in September, via U.S. mail are
$100. Winter term (.January through April) is $105, yearlong (September through April) is $180. Oncampus
PHONE NUMBERS (ALl area code 734): News 76-DAILY; Arts 763-0379: Sports 647-3336; Opinion 764-0552 ""
Circulation 764-0558; Classified advertising 764-0557; Display advertising 764-0554; Billing 764050.
NEWS Nick Bunkley, Managing Editor
EDITORADaMidEnaelsGLiassovNlchoias NisoJerrmyEditotes
STAFF Kristn BaumonKaDBant, edcarGern, Ais~ain olnna HlrkarurnedriinsuWhireyHElitt, enrishy aat h~laarel
N.d ixo ,iannon ArtyPl , ohnl Poleya, MamethestoShatephLare Strer, ka S.Be hul teie.cwrtMraSroCr
CThooniSelyTraan Baranel, aroneBrinkPleThma ?'grg
COLUNISTS:Lney Apenu.Gntaae. ai orCt ~ja utnSlerMk~av.Ae ar
SPIORS . Joae GasNchoatzoManatingEditor
ASOIREDITORS: Pheler Cunnt,nts~h al r, JoeSmIckh an Wllam
SCI DTOFRynW,Sumo~sn FdhAnGpl,JssiGeeraisn, JelHmlton, RanC MolondAey ern ry ery ytSabn h
SF.i Bhave. MAicRhake nao, CMasturhewScharz, LCrenStayi en H ed e hts elBin.~o1,Mr F~~s
RCOUNTS:Glmer, ch aad n mae, David Hoe,,Ain (ln, hit Kua, DusbetimSeblr, Meepn, o r ahi, . B yMolouh '-
APRTS Ben SGoldstz, Managing Editor"
SEENR C.EDITORS: a l Gen,EichaehenslJe Sih anWlim
SUB-TEDITORS: UsKri os ld , ALyle H Se veJkon e ft riI i lf i le/erllpsAy an.Ml, oeBejanSngtIu~I e.DcesnIl/e eil
STAFF RiC hachautalom, BhisiBMattew aree etl aeBeDavdRynHerd, Ces DuBoeRy, BranD.Aun r, Cacsctophe
Chailmer, Diceard, lHanddDidan, A a peFurMlanA,anK, AlrtaKmth, J nGws, CourstineyHoewd, J rad oy Mon, Mredh
Adam rcuRng thaninslhey, utSeertn, JamsMeaner, th aefen Sanh P ane,ad RyohFawe, Rcrth hu iner, J imi.Webda.
PHTOousBrn onsJesicaonsoinEditor.
ASOEADEITORJnie oS:lavRoKbynMlamje Ma"hl
ARTSN, C.EDITR: TOyRS:enum nn itaehPese
SBDTARSsaRC(Booksa , Lyl e Hkrmp, SamJiSchiff Jol Hu rvlin AcetLe, LmLithnnyMoush,J keroun tinreda.
OSDAFF:lChryAchQsnn Gutm a ksedtf, MathnanTrr,Eade Blenardlyan ry esWoodr o rde uun rwChitp
CosNouraneau la ielGbKaudieis oloMt ran dtaf, PhauoslhisWa oar, EMaJonsgingMedt
STAFFra Chei KlaBenyoer.Ls ClenlaiDna MuritSerilaSMmlear, WM aad MeltonsmryMrezShannO'ulvtBnOxnug
ACOIULATSEDTORSavidKatn, MikedBrleah alain

Home ~i

1$2999'

$399

$4999

a - 4 m i 31 -in

O-ffer avaiable to'
new and existing
customers.

250
Anytime
Minutes
Unlimited
N'ights
Unlimited
Weekends
'
Nationwide
Long Distance

400
Anytime
Minutes
Unlimited
Nights
Unlimited
Weekends
S
Nationwide
Long Distance

600
Anytime
Minutes
S
Unlimited
Nights
0
Unlimited
Weekends
0
Nationwide
Long Distance

Ericsson A1228di
FREE
ERICSSON

-Suddenly, "I'll call you tonight"
makes good economic sense.
S *. e

r

3

Ceilular Services
is now a part of Cingular Wireless.
9-866-CINGULAR
wwwmcinguiar corn

cingularM
WIRELESS
What do you have to say?"

Available At
ctrguiar wrees sores
Bus,,ess Saes Office, (248737 4662
ANN ARB3OR ;734) 664-8074-
BiRMINGHAM 248 258-3106
C LARKSTON i248:-62-.6870'
DEARBORN 313) 277-4111'
EASTPOWNTE ;810) 77 7-LW17'
PUNT ;80-133-061'
LATHRUP VILLAGE (2481 55-8855
NOVI 4, 444174)"
PLYMOUTH '7A 1,41-0720
SHELBY IW. ,8101,566-8?5W1
SOUTHGATE (734l? 866'

BRIGHTON Henderson Glass, 810229-5506
MB Signa. (810) 220-8500
BROWNSTOWN
Cellular Aciesnage, Inc., 1734362-7200
BURTON Mike's Pager. 810 7434847
CANTON lrender$<y, Gloss, (734) 459.6440
Prltrc. 734; 455-5100
CHIESTERFIELD
D vnnd Cmmnincations Inc. 810) 948-0035
CUNTON TWP MaCel, (810286.3333
Pae. One, 1810 7900000
Rapid Page, -610 4160000
Slpylecl.Celuia R Pagn9. (tB0V 792-8400
US W,,eless, (810! 263.5700
DEARBORN Pox P- i', {'n 313;" 581 1100

FENTON Pager One, Inc., (8101710.3333
FLUNT Joe's Pagamnaser. (8101743.3151
Metro Cetl. (810767.7900
PORT ORATlOT Cellular or MDOBA Bee",e8&
Cellular Orliet. (810) 385.1400
Metro Cell. ,810 385.6913
GARDEN CI'TY Pamrec, (734421.8000^
GROSSE POINTE Metro Cet, 313) 4172520
Pointe Commruncarions,.13114179000
HAZEL PARK
Rapid Page & Celular, Inc,. 248; 542.3333
HOLLY A-1 Wreless. (248)634-4100.
iMIAY CTY Custom Canirois Inc., 00;O 724.580(0
LAKE ORON
A & P Conmuncations. (248) 814-1122

PONTIAC
A & P Conmunicaions, (248) 332.0116
A & P Communications. (248) 373.8583
In Touc Wuieess, (2481745-15W0
Select Communications. 248) 745.8800
PORT HURON Henderson Gass,, (810 9876504
T-r Main Steet, (810) 965-7220
REDFORD Pone-Tec. Inc., (313) 387.9600
RICHMOND
AliTin: Commnunications,.(81) 727.6884
ROCHESTER Sounid Advanage. (248656-1611
Telecom USA, (243) 601-1818
ROSEVILLE
Acvmrned Communications. (8104989704
Advanred Commuications, (810) 774-5200

TAYLOR
Atlvmrced Communicatioms (7341374-1000
Cell Tech Wireless, 1313 389-3500
Elite-Cell, Inc.. (7341 374-10.20-
Page One, 313) 2954000
Pager One, Inc., 7341 374-2337
TROY Cellular Advantage, (248435-9800'
General Cellular, (248) 524-3232
Platinum Comrmunications. Inc., (248) 879-0000
Prime Paer. (248) 74039001
WARREN Airime Cellular, U.C, (810 751.4900
Cell Toch Inc., (810) 751-3777'
imperiai Plus Communicaion. (810) 759-4600
hMeg-aCel. (810 7560000
Wreiess World Comm., Inc, 810) 558-9999

J

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan