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January 10, 2001 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2001-01-10

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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, January 10, 2001-- 9

Jions hire Millen as
new president, CEO
PONTIAC (AP) - Matt Millen
moved from the field to the TV booth to
theexecutive suite.
And now, as president and CEO of the
Detroit Lions, he
plans to keep coach
Gary Moeller and is
-tIking to Barry
anders about a
comeback.
Millen agreed to a five-year, $15 mil-
lion contract. He will have complete con-
trol over all football operations.
"We've been ... pretty much stuck on
dead center for quite a few years," team
owner William Clay Ford said. "Matt
offers us an opportunity.to move ahead."
The team hasn't had a general manag-
er since Russ Thomas left in 1989. The
C ons have allowed their coaches -
.ayne Fontes, Bobby Ross and Moeller
rto run the football operation since
Thomas resigned.
- In one of his first orders of business,
Millen said he spoke with Sanders, who
taired from the Lions in 1999 as the
legue's second all-time rusher.
UNLV has contacted
itino, reports state
BOSTON (AP) - Before Boston
Celtics coach and president Rick Pitino
officially resigned on Monday, UNLV
expressed interest in his services on
Stiday, The Boston Globe reported.
"I had a phone conversation with
UJNV, Pitino told Globe. "I basically
told them that I'm going to take some
time off, then I'm going to look at some
situations. Pretty much that's it. There's
6'o openings other than UNLV That's the
ly opening in college basketball.
Were's been no contact with anybody
other than UNLV"
The Globe reported yesterday its
sources said that UNLV supporters, with
Pitino about coaching candidates,
including Pitino himself.
ONLV'officials have said they had
riothad any contact with Pitino.
Wck changes mind
again, entering draft,
11e Associated Press
The NFL might have just found its
Noh draft pick.
Virginia Tech quarterback Michael
Vick will give up his final two seasons
oa eligibility to enter the NFL draft,
according to published reports.
Vick will announce his decision
' orrow afternoon in his hometown
SoTNewport News, the Daily Press of'
Newport News reported last night.
Neither that report nor one in the
Roanoke Times cited their sources by
name. Vick, who led Division I-A in
passing efficiency as a redshirt fresh-
man in 1999, would be one of the top
picks in the draft, probably No. I. The
tan Diego Chargers own the first pick.
onzalez signs with
Indians for 1OM
CLEVELAND (AP) - Juan
Gonzalez agreed to a S10 million, one-
year contract with.the Cleveland Indians
yesterday, giving the club a right fielder
and power hitter to replace Manny
Ramirez.
Gonzalez, who has had a history of
back problems, passed a team physical
*efore signing the deal, which includes
a S14 million'mutual option for 2002.
The idians ield an afternoon news
conference 'at Jacobs Field to introduce

Gonzalez as their new tight fielder and
cleanup hitter.
"The driving force was our desire and
need for a player of Juan's ability and
Juan's desire to want to play in Cleveland,"
Indians general manager John Hart said.
lWe have a player that at 31-years-old has
all of Fame credentials."
NCAA basketball
Yesterday's results
No. 4 Tasm 86, No. 14 Altama 69
Georgia Tech 73, No. 10 VIRCNIA 68
No.11 Syracuse 64, RurGais 63
No. 6 WAKE FoREsr 76, Florida State 53
No. 22 OKLAHOMA 78, Texas A&M 65
Tomorrow's games
9 No. Carolina at No.14 MARYLAND, 7 p.m.
No.'8 Florida at MiSSISSP~t STATE, 8 p.m.
NHL
Yesterday's results
BosToN 5, Pittsburgh 2
CAROLINA 7, Florida 3
DETROIT 2, Phoenix 2
Chicago 6, N.Y. ISLANDERS 3
Buffalo at SAN JOSE, inc.
ay's games
4lorado at CoLUMBUS, 7 p.m.
Boston at MONTREAL, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at ATLANTA, 7;30 p.m.
Tampa Bay at TORONTO, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at MINNESOTA, 8 p.m.
Nashville at EDMONTON, 9 p.m.
NBA

Tankers' captain Crisman
making waves on new team

I

By Steve Jackson
Daily Sports Writer

The average senior swimmer looks at her final
athletic season as the end of her career. Jen Crisman
doesn't fit that mold.
When the All-American Crisman finishes her
days of swimming freestyle, backstroke and butter-
fly for coach Jim Richardson, she will be suiting up
for Michigan's first varsity water polo team.
Crisman won't be able to join the water polo team
until after the NCAA swimming championship. But
she wants, and will get, more time in the pool.
"I plan to stay for a fifth year, and then I will get
a full season in," Crisman said.
The Michigan women's water polo team opens its
season at Princeton Feb. 10.
"We are anxiously awaiting her arrival," water
polo coach Amber Drury-Pinto said.
The swimming co-captain was a member of the
water polo team at Jenison High School in
Hudsonville for four years.
"I play hole," Crisman said. "I stand right in front
of the other team's goal."
After she finishes her days with Michigan sports,
Crisman wants to become an FBI agent.
She has been working as a patroller for the
Department of Public Safety in Ann Arbor for a
year-and-a-half.
"It's about as close to the FBI as a college student
can get;" Crisman said. "DPS goes 24 hours, so they
were really flexible, and that is really helpful for a
student-athlete"

. She said that there isn't a lot of excitement in dri-
ving around campus, but she enjoys the work.
If the federal investigation gig doesn't work out,
Crisman - who plans on graduating with a double
major in psychology and sociology and a minor in
math -- will earn her teaching certification.
"Both of my parents were teachers and I really
enjoy the interaction with people, but I would rather
do something with more action;' said Crisman. "I
want to do investigative work."
Crisman investigated her many years of swim-
ming to determine her career's most action-filled
moment.
"My sophomore year at NCAA's, our 400-yard
freestyle relay team took third place;' Crisman said.
"It was a Big Ten record, and we were less than one-
tenth of a second away from the title. It was defi-
nitely the most exciting moment of my time in
swimming."
On Nov. 10, the Wolverines and Crisman got
their revenge over one of the teams that topped
Michigan in 1999- California. At the Continental
Airlines Classic in Houston, the 400-yard freestyle
relay was the final race. The only way that Michigan
could top the Bears was to win the event.
Thanks in part to Crisman, the Wolverines won
both the event and the meet in dramatic fashion by
.01 of a second.
No. 13 Michigan will return to action at the
Michigan Invitational this Friday and Saturday at
Canham Natatorium, where Crisman and the
Wolverines will face Illinois and No. 16 Notre
Dame.

JEFF HURVITZ/oatD
Andy Hilbert (above), Mike Cammalleri and Mike Komisarek returned to Yost this past Sunday after the
World Juniors Championship in Moscow. Their impact was felt immediately as Michigan won 5-0.

Moscow
Continued from Page 8
Komisarek's roommate. "I'll definitely have to get a
picture if I see it."
While the three have their share of stories from
the tournament - they got to spend time together in
the same hotel - they all have some lasting impres-
sions of Russia that made them appreciate what they
have in Ann Arbor.
"We had no fans over there in Russia," said
Hilbert, assistant captain of Team USA, who tallied
nine points in leading the team to a fifth-place finish
in the tournament. "It feels good to be back. You
guys have no idea."
BACK IN THE HUNTZ: The Wolverines received
more good news as assistant captain Dave
Huntzicker returned to practice Monday after miss-
ing nearly six weeks due to an MCL injur.

"It's kind of a day-to-day thing," Huntzicker said.
"It's tough, I'm sucking wind out there right now,
I've been riding the bike and doing Stairmaster
every day, but there's nothing like skating and play-
ing in a game - It'll take me a little bit to get that
back."
Michigan coach Red Berenson said he's expect
ing both Huntzicker and Jay Vancik to miss two
more games and possibly return in nine days for next
weekend's series with Western Michigan. Vancik
hurt his knee in the second game of the Great Lakes
Invitational against Boston College and has missed,
the past two games, weakening the already-depieted
blueline.
IN THE LINE OF FIRE: Michigan goaltender Josh
Blackburn was named CCHA Defensive Player of
the Week after steering aside 49 shots and posting
two consecutive shutouts over Lake Superiorthis
past weekend.

HOOSIERS
Continued from Page 8
played defense with a vigor previously
unseen this season.
"If we wanted to beat Indiana, we
had to come out and give it everything
we had," Young said. "After we walked
into the lockerroom and sang 'The
Victors,' we all sat down, and we all
just collapsed in our chairs because we
had given that much."
Michigan used that defensive inten-
sity to hold Indiana to just 35.6-per-
cent shooting for the game. For per-
haps the first time all season, the
Wolverines appeared to have more fire
and emotion than their opponents.
"Those guys battled;' Indiana inter-
im coach Mike Davis said. "They
came up with the offensive rebounds.
When the ball was loose they came up
with the loose balls. They deserved to
win this basketball game."
Michigan entered this season with
only one senior who has seen signifi-
cant playing time and four freshmen,
two of whom have made up the start-
ing backcourt for 12 of the team's 13
games.
The lack of experience and cohe-
siveness has shown, as the Wolverines
have averaged 18 turnovers a game
and have failed to effectively work the
ball into the post. But last night,
Michigan moved the ball well around
the perimeter to earn high-percentage
shots.
"Sitting on the bench and when I
was in the game, I felt like it was final-
ly time for us to step up. Enough is
enough," Jones said. "We have to real-
ize that this is a whole new team (from
last year), and I think we are starting to
gel. Everything is clicking and people

YESTERDAY'S GAME
Indiana (64)
FG FT REB
MIN MA M-A 0-T A F PTS
Jeffries 32 4.15 7 9 7-8 1 4 15
Newton 17 3-5 22 12 0 3 8
Haston 38 512 3-4 19 2 3 13
Coverdale 40 312 0-0 0-3 3 4 7
Fife 33 2-5 22 15 4 5 6
Owens 28 48 0-0 0-3 2 3 10
Hornsby 1 0.0 0.0 0-0 0 0 0
Odle 11 0-2 5-6 2.2 0 1 5
Totals 200 21-59 19.2313-3512 23 64
FG%: .356. FT%: .826. 3-point FG: 3-18, .167
(Owens 2-6, Coverdale 1-6, Haston 0-2. Fife 0-2,
Jetftries 0-1, Odle 0-1). Blocks: 3 (Jetfries 2,
Owens). Steals: 6 (Fife 3, Owens 2, Coverdale).
Turnovers: 10 (Jeffries 3. Haston 3, Coverdale 2,
Owens 2). Technical fouls: none.
MICHIGAN (70)
FG FT REB
MIN M-A M-A O-T A F PTS
Asselin 19 6A10 22 1-5 0 4 14
Blanchard 33 6-13 7-9 3-9 4 4 21
Young 33 4-10 22 2-4 0 4 10
Queen 38 1-4 0-0 02 3 0 2
Robinson 35 2-5 9-11 19 4 3 13
Jones 16 14 01 2-2 1 1 2
Searight 2 0-0 00 0-0 0 0 0
Groninger 8 01 00 0 0 0 0
Moore 15 4-4 01 0-3 1 5 8
Totals 200 24.51 20-2610-3513 21 70
FG%: .471. FT%: .769. 3-pointFG: 26,333
(Blanchard 23. Queen 0-1, Jones 01, Groninger 0-
1). Blocks: 5 (Asselin 3, Moore 2). Steals: 8
(Blanchard 2. Queen-2. Robinson Jr 2, YoungM
Jones). Turnovers: 17 (Robinson 7. Young 3, Moore
2, Blanchard, Queen. Searght Groninger).
Technical Fouls: none.
Indiana ...........32 32 -64
Michigan ................33 37 - 70
At: Criser Arena
Attendance: 10,871
are finally starting to want to win over
anything else."
With its next three games on the
road, including a trip to No. 7 Illinois
this Saturday, Michigan had to win last
nighfs game to prievent a dreadful start
to the Big Ten season.
"This is the key to bring us togeth-
er" Jones said. "We need some wins
around here to finally get things
going."

State's Randolph shining on court

By Eric Lacy
The State News
EAST LANSING (U-WIRE) - In the beginning there
were doubts.
Critics pointed to a criminal record as a severe roadblock
for him to succeed, with charges of shoplifting, battery and
receiving stolen property.
T'hen there was the hurdle of trying to qualify academical-
ly to be eligible to play Division I college basketball, as he
was 20 points below the score needed on the SAF.
Through it all, freshman center Zach Randolph has found
an ability to learn from his mistakes - it's that same mindset
that has led to improved play on the court this season.
"Everybody has some kind of problems in their past" said
Randolph, who was cleared this fall to play after an appeal to
the NCAA. "I'm just learning from mine, being a man and
moving on with my life."
Michigan State coach Tom Izzo, who kept supporting
Randolph during the recruiting process, said the 6-foot-9,
270-pound inside force has improved in all areas.
"On and off the court I have been very pleased with Zach,"
Izzo said. "I want to know how he's doing. That's my job as a
coach. I Ie's done a good job and he's handled himself well."
Freshman guard Marcus Taylor, who befriended Randolph
in both their sophomore years in high school at the Nike All-
American Basketball Camp, said he knew early that his team-
mate was a solid player and person.
"I never thought he was a bad person," Taylor said. "I
always knew of Zach's ability and talents. I also knew he
could improve and that he was willing to do it - that's why
I talked to him about coming to MSU with me during my
junior year in high school."
Izzo said Randolph's defensive skills from the first day of
practice to now are as far apart as Pluto is to Earth.
"He has coie a long way since the beginning of the year,"
Izzo said. "There's been a couple of times lately where he has
told me that he wants to guard certain guys on the floor.
That's a big, big step in the right direction."
Randolph credits Michigan State's strict strength and con-
ditioning program to his ability to defend some of the nation's

AP PHOTO
Freshman Zach Randolph has emerged as one of the corner-
stones on the Spartans' run to repeat as champions.
top post players.
"I'm in a lot better shape now and I'm learning how to
move my feet a whole lot better," Randolph said. "To improve
on defense you just have to play hard all the time."
Izzo said he has no regrets about having Randolph guard
Indiana center Kirk Haston - who hit a game-winning 3-
pointer with three seconds remaining in Sunday's stunning
59-58 loss at Assembly Hall in Bloomington.
"A lot of people asked me if I should have done anything
different in that game," Izzo said. "I'm glad I did just what I
did. He wanted to guard the guy, he did a damn good jod&iof
it, and he made me have some faith in him. I like giving chal-
lenges to my players."

--I-,-

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