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February 19, 2001 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2001-02-19

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, February 19, 2001 - 5A

t udens [
pro test
bombng
ymiR-t

Speculation circles Supreme
Court retirement possibilities

The recent American and British
bombing of Baghdad added a new
dimension to a protest originally
planned to commemorate the 10th
anniversary of the Ameriyeh Shelter
bombing, which killed hundreds of
Iraqi civilians.
Chanting "Stop the bombing, end the
sanctions, let Iraq live," several dozen
students and community members bun-
&d up to avoid the cold and protest
U.S. policies toward Iraq.
Signs reading "$$$$ billions for
guns and bombs/0 for human rights"
and "Read our lips: No more bombs!"
earned stares and a few honks from
people driving past the federal building
on Liberty Street on Saturday after-
noon.
The Ameriyeh Shelter was a neigh-
# rhood bomb shelter in Baghdad that
as destroyed during the Persian Gulf
War in 1991.
The U.S. and Great Britain
launched a joint attack on Iraqi radar
sites Friday.
"It's significant that they bombed the
capital, Baghdad, but they've been
bombing Iraq every day since 1998,"
said SNRE junior Norah Rabiah, presi-
dent of the Arab-American Anti-Dis-
crimination Committee.
gPrem Clayton, director of public
fairs for the Christian Society in
Detroit, said he agreed with the protest-
ers' message and said their views should
be given more attention and taken fur-
ther. "Even though this is a very benev-
olent and noble effort, our
consideration should be to cleanse our
hearts," he said.
Some Ann Arbor residents doing
siness in the post office expressed sur-
Tse at the most recent bombing.
Darryl Hagman said his first response
to the news was "Oh my God, another
Bush in the White House is on the
attack."
But Ann Arbor resident Joe Miess-
ner disagreed. "I don't consider the
bombing to be anything other than nor-
mal," he said. "Clinton did the same
thing for years and years and years. It
doesn't make much difference who's in
. wer."

" w
t -
AP PHOTO
Aaron Falbel of Cambridge, Mass. holds a banner during a rally at Park Street
Station in Boston Saturday.

WASHINGTON (AP) - Maybe
Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist will
leave first. After nearly 30 years on the
court, about half as chief justice, he has
dealt with almost any constitutional
issue imaginable and built a conserva-
tive legacy.
Also, the 76-year-old Rehnquist
might figure that leaving now affords
the best opportunity for a conservative
president and Republican-led Senate to
replace him.
Perhaps Justice Sandra Day O'Con-
nor, also a Republican, will quit and
retire in Arizona. O'Connor, 70, also
has made her mark in 20 years on the
court and reportedly has told friends
she's ready to travel and play golf.
Or possibly the oldest member of the
court, 80-year-old Justice John Paul
Stevens, will stop commuting between

Washington and Florida and retire in
the South.
Probably no one other than the jus-
tices and their families really knows if
any of those retirement scenarios are in
the works, but it seems nearly every
lawyer or law professor who keeps tabs
on the Supreme Court has a theory.
Justices serve for life or until they
choose to retire, and none of the current
nine has announced any intention of
leaving. They return to business tomor-
row, heading for the home stretch of the
term that ends in June.
All are in reasonably good health,
active on the bench and off, and seem to
enjoy their jobs.
Still, for political and actuarial rea-
sons, Rehnquist, O'Connor and Stevens
are counted as the most likely to retire,
possibly as soon as this year.

"All three of them are at a point
where they've served their country for
a long time now, they've completed
their bodies of work in a way that a lot
of the other, younger justices have
not," said John Yoo, a constitutional
scholar at the University of California
at Berkeley.
Over the last 100 years, the aver-
age age for a retirement was 71,
after serving 14 years on the bench,
Yoo noted. Rehnquist, O'Connor
and Stevens will be at or past those
benchmarks by the close of the cur-
rent term in June.
The exit of any one could alter the
court's familiar, fractious 5-4 ideo-
logical split, although the departure
of O'Connor or Stevens would likely
provoke the fiercest nomination bat-
tles, lawyers said.

Protests in Baghdad

I

Light bright

target latest bombing

BAGHDAD, Iraq (AP) - Thou-
sands of Iraqis marched in the rain
yesterday to protest U.S. and British
airstrikes, and Iraqi television
showed damaged houses and shops
in a town where one man was killed
when allied missiles hit nearby.
President Saddam Hussein met
with his top air defense commander to
explore ways of protecting the country
from allied attacks in the, wake of the
raid, which targeted radar and com-
mand-and-control sites.
Friday night's strikes around
Baghdad - which killed two people
and wounded at least 20 - have
raised strong condemnations from
Arab allies of the United States. And
Iraq warned that it raised tensions
ahead of key talks with the United
Nations.
Iraqi Foreign Minister
Mohammed Saeed al-Sahhaf is due
to meet U.N. Secretary-General Kofi
Annan for Feb. 26-27 discussions
seen as a chance to restart dialogue
on resuming weapons inspections
and lifting economic sanctions.
In a letter to Annan and the Secu-
rity Council, al-Sahhaf said the U.N.
chief should "condemn the danger-
ous aggression and the increase of
tension" and should take "speedy

steps to prevent such attacks from
taking place again," the official Iraqi
News Agency said yesterday.
Yesterday, Saddam met with Min-
ister of Military Industrialization
Abdel-Tawab Mulla Huwaish and Lt.
Gen. Shaheen Yassin Mohammed,
commander of air defense units,
according to Iraqi News Agency.
"The meeting discussed improv-
ing means of defending the great
Iraq and its steadfastness in order to
protect the brave Iraqis from harm,"
said the agency without elaborating.
The news agency reported Satur-
day that Saddam ordered the training
of about 300,000 volunteers for what
he called the Al-Quds - or
Jerusalem - Army aiming to free
Jerusalem from Israeli control.
"If little Bush considers his
aggression a message to Iraq, then
we have the answer, which is the
formation of al-Quds Army ..
ready for jihad (holy war) and liber-
ating Palestine," the official Iraqi
daily Al-Thawra. said in a front-
page editorial yesterday.
The United States and Britain
said the strikes were needed to
thwart Iraq's improving capabili-
ties in targeting allied jets
patrolling a southern no-fly zone.

KHANGTRAN/Daily
Members of the group Glow Worms perform at the Huaren Cultural Festival at the Michigan Theater Saturday night.

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