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February 19, 2001 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2001-02-19

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2A - The Michigan Daily - Monday, February 19, 2001

NATION/WORLD

Mexico, U.S. anticipate energy problems

SAN CRISTOBAL, Mexico (AP) - One country
suffers blackouts and soaring energy costs. The other
could likely face the same soon.
As neighbors, it would seem Mexico and the United
States have no choice but to work together to create a
regional energy plan, helping each other provide
enough power to fuel their growing economies.
But the proposal for a common energy policy for
the region stretching from Panama to Canada - put
forth by President Bush and Mexican President
Vicente Fox during their meeting here Friday -
could face strong opposition in Mexico.
The country's state-owned electricity commission
has been a sacred symbol of Mexico's sovereignty. Past
proposals to privatize or even allow more private invest-
ment were widely called attempts to sell out Mexico.
Late Saturday, a spokesman for the largest party in
Mexico's Congress, the Institutional Revolutionary
Party, expressed concern that Fox's commitments on
energy might jeopardize Mexican sovereignty and
said the party wanted to summon Foreign Secretary
Jorge Castaneda to explain before lawmakers.
Former President Ernesto Zedillo also tried, but
failed, to privatize more of the energy market to over-
come a growing need for power and to modernize a
sluggish bureaucracy. Those funds and resources are

still lacking in Mexico.
The United States faces its own crisis. Blackouts
left parts of California in the dark last month, and
residents across the country have struggled to pay
soaring energy bills.
Bush has asked Mexico to help by allowing pri-
vate U.S. capital to build electricity plants and trans-
mission lines south of the border that would send
power north.
"We can conserve better; there's no question about
it," Bush said Friday during a joint news conference
with Fox. "But demand is far outstripping supply,
which is creating a real problem for the working
people of our respective countries. And so this sub-
ject, rightly so, took quite a bit of time in our meet-
ing, and it's going to take more time down the road."
Fox has said Mexico can't meet its own energy
needs, and won't be able to help the United States
much in the near future. But, after rejecting privati-
zation of the state-run energy commission, he sup-
ported Bush's plan for a regional energy policy,
calling ita "win-win situation for everyone."
Yet he cautioned that the policy would have to
benefit all those involved - not just use developing
countries as sites to produce cheap electricity and
lots of pollution.

"We can conserve better;
there's no question about
it ."
- President Bush
"What is important is to have a common policy
whereby no one takes advantage of the other," he
said Friday.
Still, Mexico needs the United States almost as
much as its northern neighbor needs it.
Energy plants on the Baja California peninsula south
of San Diego can't keep up with demand, forcing offi-
cials to import power from an already tight U.S. market.
From Mexico City to small rural villages, many
people simply pirate power from local lines. Those
who hook up to the system legally face long lines to
pay bills and a record-keeping system that's done
largely on manual typewriters.
On Friday, the two presidents discussed the possibil-
ity of joint ventures to look for more energy resources
within their borders. But, Bush said, the challenge will
be transportation.

NEWS IN
WASHINGTON
Clinton defense fails to appease many
Former President Clinton gave his fullest defense yet of the Marc Rich pardon
yeseterday but failed to silence critics who argue that political donations and
connections helped the fugitive financier's cause.
"I want every American to knew that, while you may disagree with this
sion, I made it on the merits as I saw them, and I take full responsibility for it',
Clinton wrote in an op-ed column in The New York Times.
"The suggestion that I granted the pardons because Mr. Rich's former wife,
Denise, made political contributions and contributed to the Clinton librry founda-
tion is utterly false."
Clinton also wrote that three well-known Republican lawyers who once repre-
sented Rich "reviewed and advocated" the case for his pardon. All three denied that
assertion. "I was astounded," one said.
The former president's last-minute pardon of Rich, who has lived in Switzerland
since fleeing a 1983 indictment on tax evasion and other charges, has prompted an
investigation by federal prosecutors in New York and congressional hearings.
Investigators want to know if Rich bought his pardon by passing money t s
his ex-wife, Denise Rich, who has acknowledged making large contributions bT
to Hillary Rodham Clinton's Senate race and to the presidential library. .
LUCANE, Yugoslavia
3 Serb police officers die in van explosion
An explosion ripped through a police van and killed three Serb officersjust
outside Kosovo yesterday, heightening tensions already taut after a bus bombing
that killed at least seven Serb civilians inside the troubled province.
Yugoslavia blamed both attacks on Kosovo's ethnic Albanian militants,
denied responsibility and said one of their commanders was killed by Serbpo
lerycerday nLcae
With violence mounting, Yugoslavia urged NATO to act immediately to keep
the militants out of the buffer zone, which they have used to stage attacks on Ser-
bian police and Yugoslav army troops.
The militants want to join the zone with Kosovo as part of a push for indepen-
dence for the Serbian province, which has been run by the United Nations and
NATO-led peacekeepers since June 1999, when Yugoslavia halted its crackdown
on the Albanian majority after a NATO bombing campaign.
Friday's bombing of a bus carrying Serbs to visit the graves of relatives in Kosovo
killed at least seven people and wounded 43, the deadliest attack in the province since
13 Serb farmers were machine-gunned to death while tillingtheir fields in July 19

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Report
shows fish
supply at
low levels
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - A
worldwide netwo of no-fishing zones
may be the last, best hope of replenish-
ing the Earth's depleted stocks of fish
and other marine species, an interna-
tional team of scientists reports.
Fish, lobster and other species
recover in only a few years given sanc-
tuaries free of the hooks and nets of
commercial and sports fishermen, the
researehers say.
In a report released Saturday at the
national meeting of the American
Association for the Advancement of
Science, they urged creation of a net-
work of marine parks where all sea ani-
mals and plants would be protected.
Just as national parks provide safe
haven for threatened animals on land,
marine parks could be the salvation for
vanishing ocean life, the study said.
"The oceans are more vulnerable
than we realized," said Jane Lubhen-
co, an Oregon State University marine
scientist. "We know now that the pre-
sent methods are inadequate to protect
the oceans."
Overfishing, pushed by a hungry
-world's demand for seafood, has
moved species of fish toward extinc-
tion, the scientists said, and permanent
marine parks may be the only answer
to save them.
"The seas are increasingly in serious
trouble' said Stephen Palumbi of Har-
vard University. He said dying coral
reefs, toxic algal blooms, massive fish
kills and the collapse of fisheries are
symptoms of fundamental changes in
ocean life that are caused, in part, by
overfishing.
In heavily exploited waters, the fish
simply canot repopulate fast enough
to keep up with the harvest. Marine
parks would give them a chance, the
scientists said.
Food For Thought
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SAN'A, Yemen
2 new suspects found
in Cole bombing
President Ali Abdullah Saleh
said yesterday that two Yemenis
were arrested in connection with
the USS Cole bombing'in the past
two days upon their return from
Afghanistan.
Saleh also reiterated in an interview
with the Saudi-owned Middle East
Broadcasting Corporation that there
still is no evidence linking Saudi dissi-
dent Osama bin Laden to the Oct. 12
suicide bombing that killed 17 U.S.
sailors.
"We cannot charge him (bin Laden)
because we have no evidence against
him. We don't have confessions that
the suspects received instructions from
bin Laden," he said.
Saleh said the two Yemenis,
Mohammed Ahmed al-Ahdal ands
Ahmed Mohammed Amin, are heing
interrogated. He did not give any other
details on the arrests.
LOS ANGELES
Roger Clinton faces
drunk driving charge
Roger Clinton, the younger half-
brother of former President Clin-
ton, was arrested for investigation
of drunken driving, police said yes-
terday.
Clinton was arrested early Satur-
day after a police officer spotted
him driving erratically through this
oceanside town 18 miles south of
Los Angeles, Officer Paul Wolcott

said.
The former president pardoned
his half-brother less than a month
ago, wiping out Roger Clinton's
criminal record resulting from a
1985 guilty plea to a charge of con-
spiracy to sell a single gram of
cocaine for which he served more
than a year in prison.
Bill Clinton later described
drug prosecution as "the best
thing that ever happened" to his
brother.
STURBRIDGE, Mass.
Police find car of
Dartmouth killers
A car driven by two teen-agers
wanted in connection with the slays
of two Dartmouth College profess s
was found yesterday atla truck stop.
The silver 1987 Audi with Vermont
license plates was spotted by a state
trooper maling a routitt patrol through
a rear parking lot at the Sturbridge Isles
truck stop about two miles from the
Connecticut state line.
It was covered with snow and
authorities did not know how loi t
had been there, State Police' .
Ronald Sieberg said. Sturbridge got 1
to 2 inches of snow on Friday, the
National Weather Service said.
Robert Tulloch, 17, and James Parker,
16, both of Chelsea, Vt., were charged
as adults with two counts of first-degree
murder in the deaths of Half and
Susanne Zantop, whose bodies were
found in their home near the Dartmouth
campus in Hanover, N.H., on Jan. 27.
- Compiled from Daily wire rep#.

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